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Go Back   Casebook Forums > Ripper Discussions > Suspects > Prince Albert Victor

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Old 02-10-2011, 02:22 PM
curious4 curious4 is offline
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Default When were the court circulars delivered to the newspapers?

I seem to remember that the court circulars were delivered in advance(day before), so that the newspapers could print them on the appropriate date. As in "today her majesty attended....". Not good news for poor Eddy if it was so! Anyone have any information on this?
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Old 02-11-2011, 01:52 AM
John Savage John Savage is offline
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Hi Curious4,

I always thought that the court circulars were published a day behind, ie: Monday's events were published on Tuesday etc.

I may be wrong but it is an interesting question so if anyone can help with a definitive answer I would be grateful.

Rgds
John
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Old 02-11-2011, 01:38 PM
curious4 curious4 is offline
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Default court circulars

Hello John,

It would be interesting to know. It all depends on the wording I suppose, especially in the 188Os, when it would have taken longer to get the newspapers out I presume.

Best wishes,

c4
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:37 AM
John Savage John Savage is offline
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Hi Curious4,

Having had the time to do a little research I can now answer my own question.

I searched one or two examples from the year 1885 and the same for 1900, the dates being taken at random. In all cases I found that the events are reported the day after they occured. As I said ,Mondays events published on Tuesday etc.

Rgds
John
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:29 PM
curious4 curious4 is offline
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Default Court circulars

Thanks John, that does seem to settle it! Shame, though, I love conspiracy theories! Not the one about him fathering an illegitimate child, though, donīt reeally think anyone would bother about it and there is that old law about the heir to the throne needing Parliamentīs permission and banning marriage to Catholics.
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Old 04-10-2011, 08:34 PM
curious4 curious4 is offline
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Court circulars

I have been thinking about this again. They were printed in the newspapers on the day after the events. Presumably the newspapers were printed late at night or early in the morning in order to get them out in time. So how were they delivered to the newspapers? Telegram? Were there phones then? If you posted a letter in Scotland in the evening, would it be delivered the following morning and in that case in time to be printed?

Probably a simple answer to this and I do know that the postal service was much more efficient at the time, but even so?

Curiously,
C4
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:02 PM
YankeeSergeant YankeeSergeant is offline
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Question Mail delivery vs telegram

Quote:
Originally Posted by curious4 View Post
Court circulars

I have been thinking about this again. They were printed in the newspapers on the day after the events. Presumably the newspapers were printed late at night or early in the morning in order to get them out in time. So how were they delivered to the newspapers? Telegram? Were there phones then? If you posted a letter in Scotland in the evening, would it be delivered the following morning and in that case in time to be printed?

Probably a simple answer to this and I do know that the postal service was much more efficient at the time, but even so?

Curiously,
C4
It brings to mind a question to me though, I seem to remember reading that at the time the telegraph was controled by the Royal Post. Having said that I would assume that a telegram would have been quicker in getting say from Scotland to London than a letter would have been. (Can't comment on the guy delivering it though.) Were the two connected? And would the cost of a telegram been prohibitive to to the point of Her Majesty's staff resorting to the post for progulmating the court circular?
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Last edited by YankeeSergeant : 04-23-2011 at 07:04 PM. Reason: spelling & fat fingers
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