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Go Back   Casebook Forums > Ripper Discussions > Suspects > Stephen, James Kenneth

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  #11  
Old 06-02-2011, 12:28 PM
Bridewell Bridewell is offline
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I agree with all the previous writers. The greater the number of letters, the easier it is to generate anagrams. I would just add that the 'fact' that Stevens died in the year that the Ripper file was closed isn't actually a fact at all. Popular misconception and too often repeated. The file has never been closed, because the crimes remain undetected.
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  #12  
Old 06-02-2011, 12:50 PM
kensei kensei is offline
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Maybe people are influenced by how Hannibal Lecter used anagrams. But then, he wasn't real.
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  #13  
Old 06-05-2011, 09:50 AM
Limehouse Limehouse is offline
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In any case - writing letters and messages on walls does not make one a murderer.

John Humble sent letters and a tape to police claiming to be the Yorkshire Ripper but he was not the killer.
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  #14  
Old 06-06-2011, 02:40 AM
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The Grave Maurice The Grave Maurice is offline
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This thread has certainly been dormant for quite a while. I wonder if Joeyhawks ever wrote the book for a musical?
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  #15  
Old 06-06-2011, 07:50 AM
ChrisGeorge ChrisGeorge is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Grave Maurice View Post
This thread has certainly been dormant for quite a while. I wonder if Joeyhawks ever wrote the book for a musical?
joelyhawks wrote one single post here at Casebook and never replied to any of those who responded to the post. Maybe that says something in itself?

C
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  #16  
Old 10-07-2012, 10:34 PM
RavenDarkendale RavenDarkendale is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyhawks View Post

he claims that the writing on the wall and two of the letters are actually anagrams,


Joeyhawks
At least your anagrams make more sense than the Lewis Carroll dude's do. Forget anagrams as proof. They prove someone has a lot of time on their hands... Anagrams have so many possibilities you would have to have a key to go by.

Raven Darkendale

PS "Hardcore proof" = "Po-faced horror" "Fear Porch Odor" "Chap Food Error" "Roach Ford Rope" "Preach Rood For" and so on ad nauseum. Give it up!
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Last edited by RavenDarkendale : 10-07-2012 at 10:48 PM.
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  #17  
Old 10-07-2012, 11:06 PM
lynn cates lynn cates is offline
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Default Haven't a clue.

Hello Raven. And that brings up the larger question, "Why anagrams at all?" Of course, that leads to the generic, "Why would one leave clues?"

If one thinks about it, why one one leave a clue at all, whether it be a gash in the arm and folded underwear, an anagram, a painting, or anything else for that matter? Thinking logically, the killer would wish to beat a hasty retreat.

Cheers.
LC
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  #18  
Old 10-08-2012, 10:13 AM
Phil H Phil H is offline
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It's surelythe old problem of people thinking that the conventions of crime fiction (Agatha Christie; Ngaio Marsh; etc) apply to real life crime.

In the Poirot, Miss Marple, Inspector Alleyn etc mysteries the detective can always trace the murderer by his motive and connection (sometimes at a remove) from the victim. There are clues as in "Pocket Full of Rye"; or the murderer makes mistakes which allow him/her to be uncovered.

The the JtR case there is no evidence that the killer (at least of Nichols and Chapman) had any connection with his victim at all. At the most one might assume a customer/client relationship; or an acquaintance as fellow members of the Spitalfields community. Demonstrating anything more has not so far proved acceptable to the wider field.

Anagrams, clever minds playing games with the police, leaving clues (a la the alleged diary) are the stuff of fiction. IMHO the adherents of such ideas should have NO ROLE in bona fide Ripperology unless of until a suspect can be reliably connected to the murders and then be demonstrated to have had a plan.

We should be much more respectful on Casebook of the historical (indeed academic) approach of all ideas and theories being subject to peer review and acceptance or dismissal. This would help clarify in large measure and increasingly confused subject and allow a much sounder foundation to be built of ACCEPTED theory on which to advance and build higher.

Such an approach is universal in the academic world and should be the norm here. We are far too accepting of the outlandish and the frankly ill-based.

We might also learn a lot from the approaches to pre-history (the distant past) where evidence is often slight and rare and assumptions have to be made with caution and are subject to frequent revision. I have been reading quite widely in that field recently, and i find large measures of similarity to JtR studies.

Phil H
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  #19  
Old 11-03-2012, 01:41 AM
ChainzCooper ChainzCooper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil H View Post
It's surelythe old problem of people thinking that the conventions of crime fiction (Agatha Christie; Ngaio Marsh; etc) apply to real life crime.

In the Poirot, Miss Marple, Inspector Alleyn etc mysteries the detective can always trace the murderer by his motive and connection (sometimes at a remove) from the victim. There are clues as in "Pocket Full of Rye"; or the murderer makes mistakes which allow him/her to be uncovered.

The the JtR case there is no evidence that the killer (at least of Nichols and Chapman) had any connection with his victim at all. At the most one might assume a customer/client relationship; or an acquaintance as fellow members of the Spitalfields community. Demonstrating anything more has not so far proved acceptable to the wider field.

Anagrams, clever minds playing games with the police, leaving clues (a la the alleged diary) are the stuff of fiction. IMHO the adherents of such ideas should have NO ROLE in bona fide Ripperology unless of until a suspect can be reliably connected to the murders and then be demonstrated to have had a plan.

We should be much more respectful on Casebook of the historical (indeed academic) approach of all ideas and theories being subject to peer review and acceptance or dismissal. This would help clarify in large measure and increasingly confused subject and allow a much sounder foundation to be built of ACCEPTED theory on which to advance and build higher.

Such an approach is universal in the academic world and should be the norm here. We are far too accepting of the outlandish and the frankly ill-based.

We might also learn a lot from the approaches to pre-history (the distant past) where evidence is often slight and rare and assumptions have to be made with caution and are subject to frequent revision. I have been reading quite widely in that field recently, and i find large measures of similarity to JtR studies.

Phil H
Playing games with the police is fiction? The Zodiac killer did
Jordan
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  #20  
Old 11-03-2012, 07:37 AM
Phil H Phil H is offline
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Playing games with the police is fiction? The Zodiac killer did

Perhaps that's the exception that proves the rule?

I stick by my general point, especially where the Ripper case is involved.

Phil H

Last edited by Phil H : 11-03-2012 at 07:37 AM. Reason: spelling.
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