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-   -   Truth Stranger than Fiction (https://forum.casebook.org/showthread.php?t=10342)

Merry_Olde_Mary 06-22-2017 10:01 PM

Truth Stranger than Fiction
 
Admittedly, I know nothing about this gentleman....but seeing his name crop up in various Ripper-related books etc., I just have to wonder...was he ever teased on the police force in regards to his name?

As a youth, was he known as Master Littlechild?

I just burst out in smiles whenever I see his cloying name. It's the very essence of Victoriana, and makes me wonder if he had a sister named Sweet

: )
.

GUT 06-22-2017 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Merry_Olde_Mary (Post 418773)
Admittedly, I know nothing about this gentleman....but seeing his name crop up in various Ripper-related books etc., I just have to wonder...was he ever teased on the police force in regards to his name?

As a youth, was he known as Master Littlechild?

I just burst out in smiles whenever I see his cloying name. It's the very essence of Victoriana, and makes me wonder if he had a sister named Sweet

: )
.

I'm not sure what you mean.

It was his Surname.

Pretty sure there are still people carrying that name to this day.

Merry_Olde_Mary 06-22-2017 10:46 PM

It's an incredibly infantile sounding name for a grownup...even more so for a grown man in a position of authority. It may as well be Daintychild.

It's an uncommon name in America. I've never heard of anyone or anyone's relative with it here (though obviously they must be out there.)

Perhaps those in the UK have become desensitized to it, if it's more widespread there.

------------------------------

EDIT: this website says the origins of the Medeival name are most likely a "nickname of endearment". http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Littlechild

<< Last name: Littlechild: This is one of a quite large group of English medieval surnames which include the prefix 'Little'. These include the modern spellings as Littleboy, Littlechild, Littlefair, Littlejohn, Littlepage, and Littleproud, and all use the prefix as a nickname of endearment. It has been said that as Littlejohn, also spelt Litteljohn and Littlejohns, the meaning may refer to a very large, tall, person, as in the case of Little John, the second in command to the famous Robin Hood, and his band of outlaws. There the reference is clearly sardonic for a large man. It is generally accepted that about fifteen percent of all surnames from the medieval period, when surnames were first created, are essentially nicknames, and these surnames are good examples of the genre. Early examples of recordings taken from the surviving rolls and registers of the Middle Ages include: Robert Littelboie in the Friary Rolls of Leicester in the year 1206, Ralph Litechild in the Pipe Rolls of Leicester in 1209, Agnes Lutfair of Stafford in 1381, Litel jon of Colchester in 1350, Ralph Litel;page of Durham in 1314, and Goderun Litteprot of Hampshire in the Winton Rolls of 1066. >>

Personally, I do not associate childlike "nicknames of endearment" with police officers.

But that's me...
.

GUT 06-22-2017 11:14 PM

Quick google search will show you a few successful ones.

Not sure what you wanted him to do, change his name???

Merry_Olde_Mary 06-22-2017 11:33 PM

I just find the name quaintly incongruous. It seems (borderline) sickeningly sweet...especially in relation to the brave and serious pursuit of a serial killer.

I suppose it's just me.


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