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  • Originally posted by Mayerling View Post
    Hi Dunny,

    Thanks for your concern and wishes. I left an explanation of what is going on above in a message to Steadmund.

    Actually, the late Don Adams had already done the voice of "Tennessee Tuxedo", the penguin who wants to be helpful - and fails - for the same people who did the "Rocky and Bullwinkle" cartoons, before "Get Smart" and "Inspector Gadget".

    Jeff
    Looks like the name is spreading Dunny.
    G U T

    There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

    Comment


    • Since I was concerned about health matters for the last nine days, I feel a need to try to make a list for - hospital related movies.

      You can include clinics, or even watering places.

      01. The Hospital (1970)
      02. Men in White
      03. The "Dr. Kildare" series (with or without Lew Ayres)
      04. County Hospital (with Stan and Ollie - and Billy Gilbert as a doctor who is hanging on for his fee)
      05. The Cure (Chaplin's Mutual film with Edna Purviance and Eric Campbell)
      06. Green For Danger (a wartime hospital setting for a wonderful mystery film with Alistair Sim, Trevor Howard, and Leo Genn.)
      07. Trio (the last segment with Michael Rennie, Jean Simmons, Roland Culver, Raymond Huntley set in a sanitarium.)
      08. The Citadel
      09. Arrowsmith
      10. M.A.S.H. (wartime "meatball" surgery in Korea)

      That should start it off well.

      Jeff

      Comment


      • Paddy

        Hello Jeff. Glad you're feeling better.

        I like #1. Paddy Chayefsky was a genius.

        Cheers.
        LC

        Comment


        • Originally posted by lynn cates View Post
          Hello Jeff. Glad you're feeling better.

          I like #1. Paddy Chayefsky was a genius.

          Cheers.
          LC
          Thanks LC. I think Chayefsky was a brilliant screenplay/ straight play writer. But I also liked the film for the performances of George C. Scott and Diana Rigg.

          Jeff

          Comment


          • I loved 'Green for Danger' with Alistair Sim. Loved both book by Cristianna Brand and the film. I suppose 'One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest' is OK? It was a psychiatric facility, but still a hospital of sorts.

            Of course there were all those British 'Carry On' films with Sid James and co.. 'Carry On Doctor, Nurse, Matron' and so on. Earlier Dirk Bogarde, who was a J Arthur Rank star was in a series of films about a young trainee doctor. 'Doctor in the House' (1954) was typical of that series.

            'Intent to Kill' was a 1958 thriller starring Richard Todd. It featured a shootout in the hospital corridors!

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Rosella View Post
              I loved 'Green for Danger' with Alistair Sim. Loved both book by Cristianna Brand and the film. I suppose 'One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest' is OK? It was a psychiatric facility, but still a hospital of sorts.

              Of course there were all those British 'Carry On' films with Sid James and co.. 'Carry On Doctor, Nurse, Matron' and so on. Earlier Dirk Bogarde, who was a J Arthur Rank star was in a series of films about a young trainee doctor. 'Doctor in the House' (1954) was typical of that series.

              'Intent to Kill' was a 1958 thriller starring Richard Todd. It featured a shootout in the hospital corridors!
              Hi Rosella,

              "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" is a good choice. So are a few older movies like "The Snake Pit", "Bedlam", "Separate Worlds". I was working quickly so I forgot "Carry On Nurse" (with that concluding "Daisy" joke), and Bogard's "Doctor" Series (another one was "Doctor at Sea"). I actually once read the novel that was the basis for the first film, "Doctor in the House". The author (his first name was Richard, I can't recall the last) actually had a different ending for the character of Sir Lancelot Spratt (James Robinson Justice in the film and in the others).

              Jeff

              Comment


              • Great idea for a list !!


                I thought I would include films in mental health institutions as well..if that’s ok

                here is my starting list


                Brink of Life 1958
                One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest-1975
                Britannia Hospital- 1982 ( third film in the Mick Travis trilogy- If and O Lucky Man being the others)
                Titicut Follies-1967 ( not a "film" but a documentary by Fred Wiseman....very disturbing!!)
                Men in Black ( 1934 Three Stooges Short.. not the Tommy Lee Jones Will Smith film paging Dr. Howard, Dr. Fine, Dr. Howard)
                The Cabinet of Dr Caligari-1919
                Even Dwarfs Started Small-1970- oh Herzog...what can I say
                King of Hearts- 1966 ( I think this should count.... but maybe not)
                Shock Corridor- 1963


                Steadmund Brand
                "The truth is what is, and what should be is a fantasy. A terrible, terrible lie that someone gave to the people long ago."- Lenny Bruce

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Steadmund Brand View Post
                  Great idea for a list !!


                  I thought I would include films in mental health institutions as well..if thatís ok

                  here is my starting list


                  Brink of Life 1958
                  One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest-1975
                  Britannia Hospital- 1982 ( third film in the Mick Travis trilogy- If and O Lucky Man being the others)
                  Titicut Follies-1967 ( not a "film" but a documentary by Fred Wiseman....very disturbing!!)
                  Men in Black ( 1934 Three Stooges Short.. not the Tommy Lee Jones Will Smith film paging Dr. Howard, Dr. Fine, Dr. Howard)
                  The Cabinet of Dr Caligari-1919
                  Even Dwarfs Started Small-1970- oh Herzog...what can I say
                  King of Hearts- 1966 ( I think this should count.... but maybe not)
                  Shock Corridor- 1963


                  Steadmund Brand
                  Hi Steadmund,

                  "King of Hearts" would certainly count - who were the really insane characters, the gentle souls in the asylum (at least for this story) or the geniuses who created World War I?

                  I forgot the conclusion of "Dr. Caligari".

                  Talking about "King of Hearts", we all seem to have forgotten "Harvey", and Cecil Kellaway's rest home (and please note Jesse White's "Wilson" and his actually realistic commentary on "nice" insanity patients - Wilson might be rough and tough, but he knows wherein he speaks). Other films with asylums

                  1. Dracula (1931) - and all the others that have scenes in Dr. Seward's asylum. Paging Renfield.
                  2. Dr. X (the hospital Lionel Atwill is involved in)
                  3. Farewell My Lovely (Dick Powell has a nasty sojourn in the "clinic" run by Otto Krueger)
                  4. High Anxiety
                  5. Spellbound
                  6. The Uninvited (Cornelia Otis Skinner has a fascinatingly evil part as the head of an asylum with a nasty agenda).
                  7. Captain Carey, M.D. (again wartime medicine, this time mental units)
                  8. Three Comrades (Margaret Sullivan's attempts to regain her health at George Zucco's medical clinic - ironically in this film Zucco is a good surgeon).

                  Jeff

                  Comment


                  • I remember the Robin Williams film "Awakenings," about people coming out of comas.

                    And there was the Amicus horror film "Asylum" starring Robert Powell and Patrick Magee.

                    "The Black Sheep of Whitehall" has Will Hay dressing up as a nurse in order to rescue a top economist who has been kidnapped by Nazi agents and taken to a nursing home in the countryside.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Robert View Post
                      I remember the Robin Williams film "Awakenings," about people coming out of comas.

                      And there was the Amicus horror film "Asylum" starring Robert Powell and Patrick Magee.

                      "The Black Sheep of Whitehall" has Will Hay dressing up as a nurse in order to rescue a top economist who has been kidnapped by Nazi agents and taken to a nursing home in the countryside.
                      Hi Robert,

                      I really have gotten to like Will Hay. He was one funny character.

                      Jeff

                      Comment


                      • Yes indeed, Jeff - a likeable rogue, and with no deference whatsoever to his 'betters.'

                        If I remember correctly, "The Black Sheep of Whitehall" had none of the usual Will Hay associates, such as Harbottle and Albert, or Claude Hulbert or Charles Hawtrey. Instead John Mills steps in. There's an enjoyable chase through the countryside, involving a top economist being towed along unconscious in a bath-chair.

                        Comment


                        • Loved Cookoo's Nest, one of my favorite movies.
                          G U T

                          There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

                          Comment


                          • How about Patch Adams.
                            G U T

                            There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

                            Comment


                            • Hay, you.

                              Hello Jeff, Robert. Entirely agree about Will Hay. Seen this?

                              Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.


                              Cheers.
                              LC
                              Last edited by lynn cates; 07-22-2015, 01:02 AM.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Robert View Post
                                Yes indeed, Jeff - a likeable rogue, and with no deference whatsoever to his 'betters.'

                                If I remember correctly, "The Black Sheep of Whitehall" had none of the usual Will Hay associates, such as Harbottle and Albert, or Claude Hulbert or Charles Hawtrey. Instead John Mills steps in. There's an enjoyable chase through the countryside, involving a top economist being towed along unconscious in a bath-chair.
                                His best moments are with Moore Marriott and Graham Moffat, and Hawtrey. In "Go To Blazes" he is involved in trying to get a repaired firehouse pole back into the firehouse (a four story affair), which he somehow got out of it's holes. He, Marriott, and Moffat are struggling with this four story pole into the street, destroying property left and right, stopping traffic, and creating a crowd of about 100 men to assist them. Hawtrey, playing one of his snooty whiz kids (he was young then) starts lecturing them on physics and mechanical arts about how to move the pole, and at one point Hay says, "I have a good idea where I would like to put the damned pole!!"

                                In "Ask a Policeman" he's an incompetent police chief in a town which has the record of NO CRIMES for the last ten years (which the local High Constable does not believe for a moment). To find a smuggling ring depends on some ancient "rocking horse" meter poem but the key last line has not been remembered, accept by Marriott's even older living father (Marriott in a second part). Meeting the figity old man in his bedroom, Hay reassures, "Don't worry about this Balaclava business!" The old man does remember the last line of the quatrain - unfortunately it is longer by at least two lines than the proceeding three. Hay has gotten his information about the lair for any smuggling, but starts analyzing what is wrong about the way the quatrain was written!

                                Finally there is a choice early moment in his final movie, "My Learned Friend", where Hay is on trial for getting money under false pretenses. He has written begging letters using the name "Evelyn", and he is clearly a man.
                                But (as the author Mr. Waugh would have pointed out) men can have that name too, and Hay produces his birth certificate. He mentions in the letter
                                that he is looking at the three tots in front of him as he writes this. "But you have no children" it is pointed out. The judge (who clearly sees what he is facing) says, "Let me guess - they were tots of beer?" Clearly caught off guard (a little) Hay says, "Actually, no M'Lord! They were tots of gin!" There is also a line in the begging letter, "Nothing but this letter stands between me and the poor house!" The judge asks, "Were you writing it against the wall of the alms house?" Again surprised, Hay says, "Actually it was the door."

                                Great comic actor.

                                Jeff

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