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  • #76
    Lord of the Flies

    Not only a great movie in and of itself but in my opinion one of the very best adaptations of a book. Perfect casting of the characters as well.

    c.d.

    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

      Great choices OneRound. I loved Stan and Ollie too. I’ve been a Laurel and Hardy fan since I was a kid and so I was slightly concerned when this came out but it’s a fantastic evocation of the work and relationship between those two (imo) geniuses.

      ...
      Hi Herlock and all - well, those in the UK anyway,

      Just to flag that Stan & Ollie is on BBC1 tonight at 11:40. Worth a late night or at least dusting down the Betamax.

      Best regards,
      OneRound

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by OneRound View Post

        Hi Herlock and all - well, those in the UK anyway,

        Just to flag that Stan & Ollie is on BBC1 tonight at 11:40. Worth a late night or at least dusting down the Betamax.

        Best regards,
        OneRound
        Hi OneRound,

        Betamax?

        I’m not that hi-tech.
        Regards

        Sir Herlock Sholmes.

        “A house of delusions is cheap to build but draughty to live in.”

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by OneRound View Post
          Cracking thread, Herlock, with many wonderful contributions from all. I'm humbled that my own film, The Ladykillers from 1955, has had a shout.

          As some have touched on, a film is a bit like a meal. You always want something tasty and enjoyable. However, rather than a banquet each time, there should also be a serving of egg and chips every now and again.

          Rather than repeat so many of the films that have already been so rightly highlighted, here are 20 more (apologies if I missed any being in the above lists) which I like and have tried to slightly group. They all merit a place on my own personal menu. All comments are no more than personal opinions.

          Classics
          1. A Place in the Sun - a worthy contender for the greatest film ever. Montgomery Clift at his finest with Shelley Winters not far behind.
          2. M - Peter Lorre at his creepiest best.
          3. I am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang - title role superbly acted by Paul Muni who deserves to be much better remembered. Smart use of ''am' in the title reflecting the never ending torment.
          4. The Godfather Part II - a superlative sequel to almost rival the brilliance of its predecessor.

          Hitchcock
          5. Psycho - slightly derided nowadays but the ending was unique for its time. Very clever also how the story begins and heads off in one direction led by Janet Leigh before dramatically changing course.
          6. Frenzy - one of the director's last films with nice touches of dark humour.

          Bond
          7. Goldfinger - Connery and the car.

          Cagney
          8. Angels with Dirty Faces - Cagney was an amazingly versatile actor, here in what might appear a typical gangster role but with so much more beneath the surface.

          Ghosts
          9. Dead of Night - first (think that's right) anthology of ghost and horror stories.
          10. Field of Dreams - feel good ghost story with a lovely cameo from Burt Lancaster.

          Comedies
          11. The Apartment - Billy Wilder masterpiece with Jack Lemmon and Shirley MacLaine on excellent form.
          12. Two Way Stretch - Peter Sellers, Bernard Cribbins and Lionel Jeffries plus a host of British comedy actors from the '50s and '60s in a neat variation of a prison escape.
          13. Carry on Up the Khyber - so very annoyed with my cyber friend Caz plumping for Carry On Screaming which was going to be one of my banker choices here, Harry H Corbett was a much frustrated actor who merited more than Steptoe and stole the show in Screaming. Khyber some way behind but still an honourable runner up.
          14. National Lampoon's Animal House - beginning of the genre.

          Boys Own Films
          15. The One That Got Away - one of my favourite actors Hardy Kruger attempting and eventually succeeding in his own one man version of The Great Escape.
          16. The Flight of the Phoenix (obviously the original) - Kruger again alongside a top cast (Richard Attenborough, James Stewart, Peter Finch, Ernest Borgnine and an Oscar nominated Ian Bannen), neat twist late on concerning Kruger's character.
          17. The Italian Job (obviously the original again) - I'm sure I must have missed this being flagged above! Michael Caine, Noel Coward, Benny Hill, Irene Handl and Fred Emney all in one film and succeeding beautifully even if the heist didn't quite.

          Two Oddities
          18. Theatre of Blood - Vincent Price always gave good value for money and this was said to be his ''personal favourite movie'' alongside the delectable Dianna Rigg who regarded it as her ''best movie''. Darkly comic story of a Shakespearean actor who, with his daughter, takes murderous revenge on the literary critics who have snubbed him.
          19. The Masque of the Red Death - Price again in a Roger Corman film based upon a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. However, the acting honours are stolen by Skip Martin as the warped Hop Toad, a dwarf jester. Martin was a wonderful but criminally under used actor who would have fared much better today where his dwarfism would not have automatically closed so many doors.

          More Recently
          20. Stan and Ollie - enchanting true story of friendship. Staggered that neither Steve Coogan or John C Reilly were Oscar nominated.


          With apologies to Julie Christie for being unable to find a place for Don't Look Now. Fifty years on, I have not forgotten her role in that ''18'' rated film from when I snuck into the cinema as a fifteen year old. It was being shown in a double bill with The Wicker Man. You sure don't get two films like that for the price of one anymore.

          Best regards,
          OneRound
          Hi OneRound,

          Nice choices!

          I love Hitchcock's Frenzy. My Mum was walking past County Hall when a scene was being filmed and saw the great director in action and a 'dummy' fished out of the Thames.

          I nearly had a Bond film but couldn't decide between Goldfinger, On Her Majesty's Secret Service and You Only Live Twice.

          Dead of Night is also a favourite.

          Apologies for annoying you by plumping for Carry On Screaming. Agree with you about Harry H Corbett, although my better half would argue that it was Fenella Fielding who stole the show. We met her in 2017 when we were staying in White Horses in Portmeirion, of Prisoner fame. When we booked, we hadn't appreciated that our stay would coincide with a 50th anniversary celebration of The Prisoner. Fenella was fabulous and made hubby's day by flirting with him! We also bumped into the actor Derren Nesbitt, who was generous enough to share with us some hilarious moments from his career. Just looked him up and it turns out he played an uncredited stoker in A Night to Remember - which I can't believe I forgot when compiling my list!

          Theatre of Blood - wonderful stuff! Vincent Price acting his socks off as usual. I also remember watching The Pit and the Pendulum when I was quite young and being reassured that my Dad was watching it with me and finding it very funny.

          Don't Look Now is a great film and I adored Julie Christie. I nearly chose the original Far from the Madding Crowd and the book was a firm favourite of mine at school. I keep meaning to read it one more time, but worry about breaking the spell that kept me enchanted as a teenager.

          Love,

          Caz
          X
          "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


          Comment


          • #80
            Two of my all-time favourites that didn’t make it are Waterloo (Rod Steiger was fantastic as Napoleon) and Cromwell with Richard Harris. A Man For All Seasons is great too.
            Regards

            Sir Herlock Sholmes.

            “A house of delusions is cheap to build but draughty to live in.”

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by caz View Post

              Hi OneRound,

              Nice choices!

              I love Hitchcock's Frenzy. My Mum was walking past County Hall when a scene was being filmed and saw the great director in action and a 'dummy' fished out of the Thames.

              I nearly had a Bond film but couldn't decide between Goldfinger, On Her Majesty's Secret Service and You Only Live Twice.

              Dead of Night is also a favourite.

              Apologies for annoying you by plumping for Carry On Screaming. Agree with you about Harry H Corbett, although my better half would argue that it was Fenella Fielding who stole the show. We met her in 2017 when we were staying in White Horses in Portmeirion, of Prisoner fame. When we booked, we hadn't appreciated that our stay would coincide with a 50th anniversary celebration of The Prisoner. Fenella was fabulous and made hubby's day by flirting with him! We also bumped into the actor Derren Nesbitt, who was generous enough to share with us some hilarious moments from his career. Just looked him up and it turns out he played an uncredited stoker in A Night to Remember - which I can't believe I forgot when compiling my list!

              Theatre of Blood - wonderful stuff! Vincent Price acting his socks off as usual. I also remember watching The Pit and the Pendulum when I was quite young and being reassured that my Dad was watching it with me and finding it very funny.

              Don't Look Now is a great film and I adored Julie Christie. I nearly chose the original Far from the Madding Crowd and the book was a firm favourite of mine at school. I keep meaning to read it one more time, but worry about breaking the spell that kept me enchanted as a teenager.

              Love,

              Caz
              X
              Thanks, Caz. Splendid comments.

              Just following up on a few points.

              * The old County Hall building has been used (and I think still is being used) for a cracking theatre production of Agatha Christie's courtroom drama, Witness For The Prosecution which was also an absorbing film starring Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich and Charles Laughton. I highly recommend both the current show and the earlier film.

              * On Her Majesty's Secret Service is one of my favourite Bonds. A terrific story with Diana Rigg far, far more than any other Bond Girl. Lazenby wasn't as terrible as many say but he still gave a rather wooden performance which prevented it being a great film.

              * Had Screaming been included in my original list, I like to think I would have paid tribute to Fenella Fielding. By chance, a friend of mine sat by her on a lengthy train journey many years ago. Despite her then being well into her 60s, he found her very alluring as well as friendly and entertaining. She should have been a much bigger star and far better remembered - comments which equally apply to Derren Nesbitt. I too had no idea he was in A Night to Remember. An early film of his though which I do recall and would recommend is Strongroom - a taut race against time crime thriller with a dramatic ending. Worth rooting out on the net.

              * I don't normally go a bundle on remakes - the only films that tend to be remade are those that were deservedly successful first time and so why bother again? However, one which impressed and surprised me was Far from the Madding Crowd produced circa 2015. Wonderful cinematography doing full justice to the rural settings.

              Best wishes,
              OneRound



              Comment


              • #82
                Absolutely no one's greatest film of all time, but definitely deserves a mention:

                Threads

                A very uncomfortable watch, but a masterclass in cinema and the use of film to portray a story. Outstanding acting from a largely unknown cast, well written and filmed with nothing superfluous and nothing wasted. If you haven't seen it, don't. It's truly the most brutal depiction of mankind ever commited to the screen. It's well regarded for that reason, it really demonstrates the power of film making, but good Lord it's horrible.
                Thems the Vagaries.....

                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by caz View Post

                  Don't Look Now is a great film and I adored Julie Christie. I nearly chose the original Far from the Madding Crowd and the book was a firm favourite of mine at school. I keep meaning to read it one more time, but worry about breaking the spell that kept me enchanted as a teenager.

                  Love,

                  Caz,
                  X
                  I'm with you here Caz. I first noticed Julie in "Billy Liar" and "Darling", but it was Dr Zhivago that provide my spellbound moment. My now wife bore a striking resemblance to the Lara played by Julie Christie, and in our youth we were similarly parted by circumstances beyond our control. I used to read the book and lament our parting. Unlike Yuri and Lara, we found each other again after twenty years apart, and have since spent 33 years together. The spell has never faded.

                  Cheers, George
                  It's sad that governments are chiefed by the double tongues. There is iron in your words of death for all Comanche to see, and so there is iron in your words of life. It shall be life. - Ten Bears

                  All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. - Bladerunner

                  ​Disagreeing doesn't have to be disagreeable - Jeff Hamm

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Originally posted by OneRound View Post

                    Thanks, Caz. Splendid comments.

                    Just following up on a few points.

                    * The old County Hall building has been used (and I think still is being used) for a cracking theatre production of Agatha Christie's courtroom drama, Witness For The Prosecution which was also an absorbing film starring Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich and Charles Laughton. I highly recommend both the current show and the earlier film.

                    * On Her Majesty's Secret Service is one of my favourite Bonds. A terrific story with Diana Rigg far, far more than any other Bond Girl. Lazenby wasn't as terrible as many say but he still gave a rather wooden performance which prevented it being a great film.

                    * Had Screaming been included in my original list, I like to think I would have paid tribute to Fenella Fielding. By chance, a friend of mine sat by her on a lengthy train journey many years ago. Despite her then being well into her 60s, he found her very alluring as well as friendly and entertaining. She should have been a much bigger star and far better remembered - comments which equally apply to Derren Nesbitt. I too had no idea he was in A Night to Remember. An early film of his though which I do recall and would recommend is Strongroom - a taut race against time crime thriller with a dramatic ending. Worth rooting out on the net.

                    * I don't normally go a bundle on remakes - the only films that tend to be remade are those that were deservedly successful first time and so why bother again? However, one which impressed and surprised me was Far from the Madding Crowd produced circa 2015. Wonderful cinematography doing full justice to the rural settings.

                    Best wishes,
                    OneRound


                    Hi OneRound,

                    Witness for the Prosecution is an excellent film and would have been on my original list had I thought of it in time. I rarely get up to London these days, sadly, but my Dad worked at County Hall for the LCC and then the GLC all his working life apart from the war years, so it has many memories for me. He was involved in the financial administration for the Thames flood barrier.

                    I rather liked George Lazenby's performance, particularly when he sported that kilt and the girls, including a very young Joanna Lumley, were most impressed! Diana Rigg was wonderful and the ending always makes me cry. I remember Diana Rigg starring in a tv version of Witness for the Prosecution, taking the role played by Marlene Dirtytrix.

                    I'll look into Strongroom. I did enjoy Nobody Runs Forever.

                    Remakes nearly always leave me cold, and I'm afraid it has to be the original Madding Crowd for me, with Alan Bates, Peter Finch and the gorgeous Terence Stamp. Same with The Great Gatsby. I must read that book again too!

                    Love,

                    Caz
                    X
                    "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Al Bundy's Eyes View Post
                      Absolutely no one's greatest film of all time, but definitely deserves a mention:

                      Threads

                      A very uncomfortable watch, but a masterclass in cinema and the use of film to portray a story. Outstanding acting from a largely unknown cast, well written and filmed with nothing superfluous and nothing wasted. If you haven't seen it, don't. It's truly the most brutal depiction of mankind ever commited to the screen. It's well regarded for that reason, it really demonstrates the power of film making, but good Lord it's horrible.
                      Hi Al,

                      I didn't see Threads when it first came out, which I'm very relieved about, but I've seen it twice in more recent times and it is truly horrific and deeply depressing. I agree with you that anyone of a nervous disposition should stay well away!

                      Love,

                      Caz
                      X
                      "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Originally posted by GBinOz View Post

                        I'm with you here Caz. I first noticed Julie in "Billy Liar" and "Darling", but it was Dr Zhivago that provide my spellbound moment. My now wife bore a striking resemblance to the Lara played by Julie Christie, and in our youth we were similarly parted by circumstances beyond our control. I used to read the book and lament our parting. Unlike Yuri and Lara, we found each other again after twenty years apart, and have since spent 33 years together. The spell has never faded.

                        Cheers, George
                        How wonderful, George!

                        Dr Zhivago is another film that has me in floods of tears every time - oh that ending! I first saw it with my best friend from school and her Mum and I was absolutely hooked. I wanted to be Julie Christie. When I met my better half he had never seen it, so we have made up for that now and usually watch it every winter. I remember watching it one Christmas, many years ago, while munching my way through a giant bar of Toblerone all to myself!

                        Love,

                        Caz
                        X
                        "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


                        Comment


                        • #87
                          As a sub-set of the best movies, I would like to nominate the best westerns:

                          Jeremiah Johnson

                          Hombre

                          The Outlaw Josey Wales

                          The Red Sun

                          IMHO the greatest dialogue in any western was from The Outlaw Josey Wales between Clint Eastwood and Will Sampson:

                          Josie Wales : You be Ten Bears?

                          Ten Bears : I AM Ten Bears.

                          Josie Wales : I'm Josey Wales.

                          Ten Bears : I have heard. You are the Gray Rider. You would not make peace with the Bluecoats. You may go in peace.

                          Josie Wales : I reckon not. I got no place else to go.

                          Ten Bears : Then you will die.

                          Josie Wales : I came here to die with you. Or to live with you. Dying ain't so hard for men like you and me. It's living that's hard when all you've ever cared about has been butchered or raped. Governments don't live together - people live together. With governments, you don't always get a fair word or a fair fight. Well, I've come here to give you either one or get either one from you. I came here like this so you'll know my word of death is true, and my word of life is then true. The bear lives here, the wolf, the antelope, the Comanche. And so will we. Now we'll only hunt what we need to live on, same as the Comanche does. And every spring, when the grass turns green, and the Comanche moves north, you can rest here in peace, butcher some of our cattle, and jerk beef for the journey. The sign of the Comanche, that will be on our lodge. That's my word of life.

                          Ten Bears : And your word of death?

                          Josie Wales : It's here in my pistols and there in your rifles. I'm here for either one.

                          Ten Bears : These things you say we will have, we already have.

                          Josie Wales : That's true. I ain't promising you nothing extra. I'm just giving you life and you're giving me life. And I'm saying that men can live together without butchering one another.

                          Ten Bears : It's sad that governments are chiefed by the double tongues. There is iron in your words of death for all Comanche to see, and so there is iron in your words of life. No signed paper can hold the iron. It must come from men. The words of Ten Bears carries the same iron of life and death. It is good that warriors such as we meet in the struggle of life... or death. It shall be life.
                          It's sad that governments are chiefed by the double tongues. There is iron in your words of death for all Comanche to see, and so there is iron in your words of life. It shall be life. - Ten Bears

                          All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. - Bladerunner

                          ​Disagreeing doesn't have to be disagreeable - Jeff Hamm

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            A little trivia on this movie:

                            Click image for larger version

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                            The pistols used by Josey Wales in this movie were Colt Walkers. These were the most powerful handguns ever produced until the introduction of the 357 Magnum. They were cap and ball pistols loaded with black powder, which was explosive, in contrast to modern powder, which is slow burn gas release. Unlike the cartridge revolver, the cylinder was loaded with powder, a lead ball projectile and a wad of grease. The cylinder in a Colt Cap and Ball pistol could be removed via a lever under the barrel, so spare loaded cylinders could be carried for quick change. The front of the cylinder was coated with grease to both lubricate the barrel and to prevent a crossfire between the cylinders. The problem with the Walkers was, their weight and, their propensity for cylinders exploding on occasion when fired due to their high load of powder.

                            Cheers, George
                            It's sad that governments are chiefed by the double tongues. There is iron in your words of death for all Comanche to see, and so there is iron in your words of life. It shall be life. - Ten Bears

                            All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. - Bladerunner

                            ​Disagreeing doesn't have to be disagreeable - Jeff Hamm

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Originally posted by GBinOz View Post
                              A little trivia on this movie:


                              The pistols used by Josey Wales in this movie were Colt Walkers. These were the most powerful handguns ever produced until the introduction of the 357 Magnum. They were cap and ball pistols loaded with black powder, which was explosive, in contrast to modern powder, which is slow burn gas release. Unlike the cartridge revolver, the cylinder was loaded with powder, a lead ball projectile and a wad of grease. The cylinder in a Colt Cap and Ball pistol could be removed via a lever under the barrel, so spare loaded cylinders could be carried for quick change. The front of the cylinder was coated with grease to both lubricate the barrel and to prevent a crossfire between the cylinders. The problem with the Walkers was, their weight and, their propensity for cylinders exploding on occasion when fired due to their high load of powder.

                              Cheers, George
                              Cheers George, an excellent post on a superb movie. Don't forget the Colt's 1851 Navy model in .36 calibre he carried in a shoulder holster as a back up pistol.
                              Why a four-year-old child could understand this report! Run out and find me a four-year-old child, I can't make head or tail of it.

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by Enigma View Post

                                Cheers George, an excellent post on a superb movie. Don't forget the Colt's 1851 Navy model in .36 calibre he carried in a shoulder holster as a back up pistol.
                                Hi Enigma,

                                Thank you, it is gratifying that some else appreciates the excellence of this movie. I find particular merit in the portrayals of Chief Dan George as Lone Watie, and Will Sampson as Ten Bears, in representing the holocaust that befell the Indian nations at the hands of the white invaders. This was in stark contrast to other movies immediately preceding this movie. Added to this was the tragedy of the aftermath of the civil war.

                                I enjoyed the portrayal of historic black powder pistols, and the principal that the cool head will prevail in any confrontation. I commend this movie to all members of the forum.

                                Cheers, George
                                It's sad that governments are chiefed by the double tongues. There is iron in your words of death for all Comanche to see, and so there is iron in your words of life. It shall be life. - Ten Bears

                                All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. - Bladerunner

                                ​Disagreeing doesn't have to be disagreeable - Jeff Hamm

                                Comment

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