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  • Originally posted by barnflatwyngarde View Post

    Hi Abby,
    No "special skill"involved in relation to the Dyatlov Pass book!
    Just the dumb decision to let a computer translate and proof-read it.
    garbage in. garbage out. sounds like the book has more than just translation problems. lol
    "Is all that we see or seem
    but a dream within a dream?"

    -Edgar Allan Poe


    "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
    quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

    -Frederick G. Abberline

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

      it sounds like the time i bought a book that was called the definitive history of Rock and roll. so full of meaningless and obscure details that I couldnt make out what the relevance was, so boring-i only got to the third chapter.
      Im not sure how anyone could take such a fascinating subject like the history of rock and roll or the Dyatlov pass mystery and make it so boring and incomprehensible.

      Its got to be a special skill.
      Hi Abby,

      Theres no doubt that the authors knew their subject all ends up. They’ve clearly lived and breathed the case for years so there has to be at least a chance that they might have gotten it right but…. as Barn and Ms D have both said the book should have been passed onto someone before hand who, a) had a better grasp of the English language, and b) would knew a readable book when they read one. A real wasted opportunity as, apart from the solution which is always going to be debatable, this book should have been the ‘Bible’ of the subject.
      Regards

      Herlock Sholmes

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

        Hi Abby,

        Theres no doubt that the authors knew their subject all ends up. They’ve clearly lived and breathed the case for years so there has to be at least a chance that they might have gotten it right but…. as Barn and Ms D have both said the book should have been passed onto someone before hand who, a) had a better grasp of the English language, and b) would knew a readable book when they read one. A real wasted opportunity as, apart from the solution which is always going to be debatable, this book should have been the ‘Bible’ of the subject.
        If you ever feel like reading another (intelligible!) book on the subject, I'd say give the McCloskey one a go.

        I don't blame you if you never want to read or think about the subject ever again though!

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Ms Diddles View Post

          If you ever feel like reading another (intelligible!) book on the subject, I'd say give the McCloskey one a go.

          I don't blame you if you never want to read or think about the subject ever again though!
          I might do that Ms D. I’ll put it onto my list of ‘books to get.’
          Regards

          Herlock Sholmes

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Ms Diddles View Post

            If you ever feel like reading another (intelligible!) book on the subject, I'd say give the McCloskey one a go.

            I don't blame you if you never want to read or think about the subject ever again though!
            In the words of Tom Waits, " You must be reading my mail."

            Comment


            • It's ages since I read it, but I remember quite liking the McCloskey book.

              I can't recall what theory he was pushing now though.

              I might check that out to remind myself.

              Anyway, it'll be a walk in the park after the last offering!

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

                Hi Abby,

                Theres no doubt that the authors knew their subject all ends up. They’ve clearly lived and breathed the case for years so there has to be at least a chance that they might have gotten it right but…. as Barn and Ms D have both said the book should have been passed onto someone before hand who, a) had a better grasp of the English language, and b) would knew a readable book when they read one. A real wasted opportunity as, apart from the solution which is always going to be debatable, this book should have been the ‘Bible’ of the subject.
                well thats the rub isnt it? you can be an expert and have vast amounts of knowledge of something but if your analysis/conclusions are ridiculous whats it all amount to?zip.

                I dont how many people i know who are extremely knowledgeable AND smart yet draw the most stupid conclusions. In this case- a falling tree and government cover up?!? lol. what a bunch of nonsense. I wouldnt trust anything from these authors-it would make me question even their basic "facts" they present.

                Its like cornwalls book on sickert. I had to stop reading after a few chapters when she started claiming most/all the ripper letters were from not only the same person, and the ripper-- but sickert?! I didnt trust anything else she said and the book was pointless to me for that reason.

                the facts AND analysis have to both be correct and reasonable-if either is not-then it leads to questioning one or the other-and the whole things credibility falls apart.

                I absolutely can not stand books of "non-fiction" like this.
                "Is all that we see or seem
                but a dream within a dream?"

                -Edgar Allan Poe


                "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                -Frederick G. Abberline

                Comment


                • One could say I "completed" 1079 but have to admit to being very lame and scanning through much of it; especially the annoying mini-bios, which in my view, were nothing more than space fillers. The author's dangling questions were also annoying. However, the Cedar tree-fell theory did not seem to be unrealistic to me. At first. It aligned with the blunt-force injuries the group sustained and seems to reason why they'd have to cut their way out. In fact, I thought perhaps a fell-tree was perhaps more realistic than a freak-of-nature ice and snow slab incident whose calculus had to equate in order for the event to occur. However, this "Magic Tree" (kudos Herlock!) was where, exactly??? The last photo taken of the group digging out the ill-fated site indicates no trees anywhere unless it's behind the photographer? But the tree is also not in the rescue/search party photo either.

                  (See Figure 1 from this site)

                  https://www.nature.com/articles/s43247-020-00081-8#Fig5

                  Above is the article I was also discussing earlier that explains the calculus behind the snow/ice slab theory that I still accept unless something comes up a bit more convincing. Not that I understand the calculus of it beyond the 1st line. One of the authors (Gaume) are the engineers of the "Disney" research team who also emulate real-time snow and avalanches for the movie Frozen. These are the findings that appear in National Geographic article of (Jan 2021). The only concern to me is Disney, I believe, owns National Geographic and I have to wonder how that plays into this theory as well.

                  But in summary, I think perhaps these snow/slab incidents may not be as rare as one would think given the terrain and vast area of northern Urals.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Filby View Post
                    One could say I "completed" 1079 but have to admit to being very lame and scanning through much of it; especially the annoying mini-bios, which in my view, were nothing more than space fillers. The author's dangling questions were also annoying. However, the Cedar tree-fell theory did not seem to be unrealistic to me. At first. It aligned with the blunt-force injuries the group sustained and seems to reason why they'd have to cut their way out. In fact, I thought perhaps a fell-tree was perhaps more realistic than a freak-of-nature ice and snow slab incident whose calculus had to equate in order for the event to occur. However, this "Magic Tree" (kudos Herlock!) was where, exactly??? The last photo taken of the group digging out the ill-fated site indicates no trees anywhere unless it's behind the photographer? But the tree is also not in the rescue/search party photo either.

                    (See Figure 1 from this site)

                    https://www.nature.com/articles/s43247-020-00081-8#Fig5

                    Above is the article I was also discussing earlier that explains the calculus behind the snow/ice slab theory that I still accept unless something comes up a bit more convincing. Not that I understand the calculus of it beyond the 1st line. One of the authors (Gaume) are the engineers of the "Disney" research team who also emulate real-time snow and avalanches for the movie Frozen. These are the findings that appear in National Geographic article of (Jan 2021). The only concern to me is Disney, I believe, owns National Geographic and I have to wonder how that plays into this theory as well.

                    But in summary, I think perhaps these snow/slab incidents may not be as rare as one would think given the terrain and vast area of northern Urals.
                    Well done Filby, you're now in the "Gang of Four" who suffered, but survived the agony that was "1079".

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Filby View Post
                      One could say I "completed" 1079 but have to admit to being very lame and scanning through much of it; especially the annoying mini-bios, which in my view, were nothing more than space fillers. The author's dangling questions were also annoying. However, the Cedar tree-fell theory did not seem to be unrealistic to me. At first. It aligned with the blunt-force injuries the group sustained and seems to reason why they'd have to cut their way out. In fact, I thought perhaps a fell-tree was perhaps more realistic than a freak-of-nature ice and snow slab incident whose calculus had to equate in order for the event to occur. However, this "Magic Tree" (kudos Herlock!) was where, exactly??? The last photo taken of the group digging out the ill-fated site indicates no trees anywhere unless it's behind the photographer? But the tree is also not in the rescue/search party photo either.

                      (See Figure 1 from this site)

                      https://www.nature.com/articles/s43247-020-00081-8#Fig5

                      Above is the article I was also discussing earlier that explains the calculus behind the snow/ice slab theory that I still accept unless something comes up a bit more convincing. Not that I understand the calculus of it beyond the 1st line. One of the authors (Gaume) are the engineers of the "Disney" research team who also emulate real-time snow and avalanches for the movie Frozen. These are the findings that appear in National Geographic article of (Jan 2021). The only concern to me is Disney, I believe, owns National Geographic and I have to wonder how that plays into this theory as well.

                      But in summary, I think perhaps these snow/slab incidents may not be as rare as one would think given the terrain and vast area of northern Urals.
                      Nice work, Filby!

                      You made it through too!

                      Valid point about the lack of trees in the final photograph!!

                      FWIW I'm still leaning avalanche, but need to get my head around that study that contradicts Puzrin - Gaume.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by barnflatwyngarde View Post

                        Well done Filby, you're now in the "Gang of Four" who suffered, but survived the agony that was "1079".
                        Perhaps the four of us should get matching tattoos to remind us of our triumph over adversity?!

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Filby View Post
                          One could say I "completed" 1079 but have to admit to being very lame and scanning through much of it; especially the annoying mini-bios, which in my view, were nothing more than space fillers. The author's dangling questions were also annoying. However, the Cedar tree-fell theory did not seem to be unrealistic to me. At first. It aligned with the blunt-force injuries the group sustained and seems to reason why they'd have to cut their way out. In fact, I thought perhaps a fell-tree was perhaps more realistic than a freak-of-nature ice and snow slab incident whose calculus had to equate in order for the event to occur. However, this "Magic Tree" (kudos Herlock!) was where, exactly??? The last photo taken of the group digging out the ill-fated site indicates no trees anywhere unless it's behind the photographer? But the tree is also not in the rescue/search party photo either.

                          (See Figure 1 from this site)

                          https://www.nature.com/articles/s43247-020-00081-8#Fig5

                          Above is the article I was also discussing earlier that explains the calculus behind the snow/ice slab theory that I still accept unless something comes up a bit more convincing. Not that I understand the calculus of it beyond the 1st line. One of the authors (Gaume) are the engineers of the "Disney" research team who also emulate real-time snow and avalanches for the movie Frozen. These are the findings that appear in National Geographic article of (Jan 2021). The only concern to me is Disney, I believe, owns National Geographic and I have to wonder how that plays into this theory as well.

                          But in summary, I think perhaps these snow/slab incidents may not be as rare as one would think given the terrain and vast area of northern Urals.
                          Now you need to pour yourself a hefty drink, sit in your most comfortable armchair and book yourself a holiday to anywhere in the world apart from Siberia.
                          Regards

                          Herlock Sholmes

                          Comment

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