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Help reading handwriting on ancestors ww1 hospital record

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  • Help reading handwriting on ancestors ww1 hospital record

    Hello we are trying to decipher some of the comments on the document most notably the remarks section.

    Considering people here have probably deciphered handwritings before i wndered if you could have a go at this..

    The part you are looking at is the description of injuries we know he lost his hand (g.s.w gun shot wound) however we also think he was injured in the back and buttocks... Also we think he was gassed but cant seem to find anything on that.

    However i cant decipher the attached which would shed sone light
    Many thanks in advanced
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Originally posted by SkipToTheEnd View Post
    Hello we are trying to decipher some of the comments on the document most notably the remarks section.
    I think the first line is "Large W - (F?) Buttock very dirty & healing" There's a word over the line that I can't make out - "slow" would make sense in context, but I don't think that's it.

    I'm fairly sure the second line begins "Hand Amp. in France. (exchange?)"

    The last word on the third line might be "penis".

    Best Wishes!
    Last edited by Ginger; 11-20-2018, 08:06 PM. Reason: Afterthought
    - Ginger

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    • #3
      Are the first two worlds "Days 4"?
      Bona fide canonical and then some.

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      • #4
        And, looking at it with fresh eyes, I think the word on the third line is perhaps "discharging".
        - Ginger

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        • #5
          Large W (wound?)- R (right?) Buttock very dirty& still healing

          Hand Amp in France (?) exemplified (?????)


          Discharging
          "Is all that we see or seem
          but a dream within a dream?"

          -Edgar Allan Poe


          "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
          quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

          -Frederick G. Abberline

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          • #6
            I make it:

            ?? of Buttock very dirty but healing.

            Hand Amp in France. Stumps still discharging.
            Last edited by Sam Flynn; 11-21-2018, 09:17 AM.
            Kind regards, Sam Flynn

            "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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            • #7
              I think some of it reads

              Large W (wound?) ? Buttock very dirty but healing.
              Hand grip is ? (Trance?) ? still discharging.

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              • #8
                Very dirty and still leaking?

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                • #9
                  I think he is quoting the patient.

                  {Patient} Says w[ound] of buttock very dirty and still hurting. (or healing)

                  Hand amp[utated] in France, stump still discharging.

                  WW 1 was Hell. My grandfather survived the Battle of the Marne, but wouldn't talk about it 75 years later (he was 17 during the war). Too bad the Paris drizzle prevented Bone Spurs from paying his respects.

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                  • #10
                    I also think that the first word might be "Says"
                    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                    "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ahh! thank you all this has been very beneficial!


                      Yes I think the first line is something like

                      "says w (wound - they seem to short hand a lot on these documents eg: g.sw. = gun shot wound), of buttock very dirty and healing/(still)hurting/(still) leaking"

                      The second line is probably as per rjpalmer "hand amputated in france, stump still discharging" as he wore a hook after ww1

                      thanks tremendously this has been a lot of help! WW1 was indeed horrible, I have been researching a few of my ancestors in that war. Some made it back like the above with war wounds, others survived unscathed and others don't even have a grave .

                      One of my ancestors even had his memoirs recorded by the imperial war museum which was weird to hear! (saying that he was a "a coward really" even though he was at the ypres when they blew up hill 60 - crazy!)

                      I feel kind of sorry for my ancestor to which the document was a part of, he survived but he was called up at the age of 35 with already a family of 5 daughters. must have been horrifying being called up thinking i'll never see them again. Then again one of my ancestors was late teenager early 20s and never came home. such a terrible waste of life.

                      again thanks so much for looking at this!

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                      • #12
                        Hi Skip

                        I think the 'coward' bit sounds like the kind of thing a man would say if he felt guilty about having survived when his comrades didn't. I think a lot of men felt like that.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Robert View Post
                          Hi Skip

                          I think the 'coward' bit sounds like the kind of thing a man would say if he felt guilty about having survived when his comrades didn't. I think a lot of men felt like that.
                          From personal experience, few of the WWI/II generation came home bragging about, or dramatising, their wartime experiences. Funny stories about their and their mates’ escapades were on the regular agenda; their darker experiences only came out in nightmares and occasional inadvertent comments. Brave men.
                          Last edited by MrBarnett; 11-23-2018, 04:57 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Exactly, Gary. Dignified. Quite unsuited to today's circus society.

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