Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Greatest physicists of all time

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by Robert View Post
    I vote for Newton, mostly because he once lived near me.

    Blimey, you've survived well, Joshua.
    He was also a whiz at finding counterfeiters and gold coin "shavers". He also suggested a weird looking steam powered automobile, though apparently he never built a prototype. I used to have a model of it.

    But he did not invent the "fig newton" cookie! It is named for a town in Massachusetts where it was created.

    Wasn't Leibnitz also the model for Voltaire's "Dr. Pangloss" with the "best of all possible worlds" philosophy lampooned in "Candide"? I may be wrong there.

    Jeff

    Comment


    • #47
      Jeff, yes, Dr Pangloss - "all is for the best in this the best of all possible worlds."

      Comment


      • #48
        No one has said Shelton Cooper, who has probably done more for Physics than anyone in recent years.
        G U T

        There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by GUT View Post
          No one has said Shelton Cooper, who has probably done more for Physics than anyone in recent years.
          Yes Sheldon can certainly do a bang-up job of entertaining us!

          I never took much math or science, but a sci-fi fan picks up enough to catch most of your scientist-in-a-bar jokes, which were pretty good.

          However, seriously-- no mention of Leonardo da Vinci?! The original Renaissance man, whose inventions required as much math and physics as drawing technique? Come on!
          Pat D. https://forum.casebook.org/core/imag...rt/reading.gif
          ---------------
          Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
          ---------------

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post
            Yes Sheldon can certainly do a bang-up job of entertaining us!

            I never took much math or science, but a sci-fi fan picks up enough to catch most of your scientist-in-a-bar jokes, which were pretty good.

            However, seriously-- no mention of Leonardo da Vinci?! The original Renaissance man, whose inventions required as much math and physics as drawing technique? Come on!
            A genius for sure, but not sure he qualifies as a physicist.

            Probably the greatest mind even in my opinion.
            G U T

            There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Pcdunn View Post
              Yes Sheldon can certainly do a bang-up job of entertaining us!

              I never took much math or science, but a sci-fi fan picks up enough to catch most of your scientist-in-a-bar jokes, which were pretty good.

              However, seriously-- no mention of Leonardo da Vinci?! The original Renaissance man, whose inventions required as much math and physics as drawing technique? Come on!
              You're right Pat, he was a real genius - nobody to touch him in so many fields of inquiry. Problem is, his real impact on contemporaries and people for about two hundred years was through his paintings - the notebooks were not found and published until the 18th Century (I believe). So whatever real impact on the sciences he might have had was sort of squandered - even if we really admire his ideas and concepts.

              Jeff

              Comment


              • #52
                "He was also a whiz at finding counterfeiters and gold coin "shavers"."

                Hello Jeff,

                Yes, I read the book "Newton and the Counterfeiter." Very interesting.

                c.d.

                Comment


                • #53
                  SCIENTISTS HONOUR EINSTEIN

                  HAWKING : Come in, Albert. We've a lovely meal for you.

                  BOHR : Are there enough electrons to go round?

                  HEISENBERG : I don't know. Every time I try to count them they keep jumping about. And they're not very filling.

                  PLANCK : Never mind. Good things come in small packages.

                  EINSTEIN : Maybe I could have a sandwich?

                  HAWKING : I threw out all the bread. It's full of wormholes. There's some soup, but it's not cooked yet.

                  EINSTEIN : Couldn't you put it in the microwave?

                  PENZIAS AND WILSON : Not till we've cleaned it out - it seems to be full of bird droppings.

                  EINSTEIN : Look, if I go off in a spaceship will the meal be ready when I return?

                  BOHR : Yeah, but it will be cold. Hey, here comes Hubble.

                  HUBBLE : I've been to the baker's and bought a cake.

                  SCHRODINGER : Don't open that box!!! Aaargh!

                  HEISENBERG : The thing's expanding.

                  EINSTEIN : Help, I can't breathe. Coming here was the biggest blunder of my career.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Robert View Post
                    SCIENTISTS HONOUR EINSTEIN

                    HAWKING : Come in, Albert. We've a lovely meal for you.

                    BOHR : Are there enough electrons to go round?

                    HEISENBERG : I don't know. Every time I try to count them they keep jumping about. And they're not very filling.

                    PLANCK : Never mind. Good things come in small packages.

                    EINSTEIN : Maybe I could have a sandwich?

                    HAWKING : I threw out all the bread. It's full of wormholes. There's some soup, but it's not cooked yet.

                    EINSTEIN : Couldn't you put it in the microwave?

                    PENZIAS AND WILSON : Not till we've cleaned it out - it seems to be full of bird droppings.

                    EINSTEIN : Look, if I go off in a spaceship will the meal be ready when I return?

                    BOHR : Yeah, but it will be cold. Hey, here comes Hubble.

                    HUBBLE : I've been to the baker's and bought a cake.

                    SCHRODINGER : Don't open that box!!! Aaargh!

                    HEISENBERG : The thing's expanding.

                    EINSTEIN : Help, I can't breathe. Coming here was the biggest blunder of my career.
                    Brilliant!
                    "Is all that we see or seem
                    but a dream within a dream?"

                    -Edgar Allan Poe


                    "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                    quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                    -Frederick G. Abberline

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Robert View Post
                      PENZIAS AND WILSON : Not till we've cleaned it out - it seems to be full of bird droppings.
                      Nice one, Robert

                      Birds' mess soup, eh?
                      Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                      "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Mayerling View Post
                        Trevethick and Stephenson have their eyes trained on a distant point. Peter Cooper would look at it too, but with his telescope he's all "Tom Thumbs".
                        Is this Richard Trevethick?

                        Can I just point out that this fella is a relation of mine. It's a long story but shortened the Cornish came to work in the mines in Durham.

                        I lay absolutely no claim to any scientific knowledge or interest, so the genes haven't been passed down, but if anyone knows of an unclaimed patent or such worth upwards of 1 million quid then I am the sole heir (mail me, there's 5% in it for you).

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Fleetwood Mac View Post
                          Is this Richard Trevethick?

                          Can I just point out that this fella is a relation of mine. It's a long story but shortened the Cornish came to work in the mines in Durham.

                          I lay absolutely no claim to any scientific knowledge or interest, so the genes haven't been passed down, but if anyone knows of an unclaimed patent or such worth upwards of 1 million quid then I am the sole heir (mail me, there's 5% in it for you).
                          Hi Fleetwood.

                          Yes it was your relative, Mr. Richard Trevethick. He's sort of been hidden behind the shadow of Robert Stephenson, although he was an accomplished engineer - the reason though was Trevethick's work with locomotives was involved not with public transportation as such, but with mines. Stephenson captured the public imagination with his "Rocket". Trevethick did make a kind of road steam driven car or carriage, a bit like Sir Goldswater Gurney's steam powered carriage of the 1830s, but both failed to capture public support. People did not fully trust steam engines on public roads, and they remained in the province of horses, wagons, and pedestrians until the development of the gasoline engine vehicles of the 1880s - 1900s.


                          I'm sorry - just don't know of any unclaimed patents to help you with. Good luck if you seek them.

                          Jeff

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X