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Valerie Storie's 3 part story as published in 'Today' magazine, June 1962

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  • Hi OR,

    yes, I do take your points on board, but the i.d. parades did not, I assume, contravene any laid-down procedure or law which applied at the time. JH's solicitor, Emmanuel Kleinmann, rolled up an hour late for the parade, and announced that he was satisfied with the arrangements, but did say later that JH's 'dyed hair showed up badly'. Acott had I believe requested that surgical-type skull-caps be issued to everyone on the parade, but this never happened and Kleinmann allowed the parade to go ahead without skull-caps. Woffinden suggests that Kleinmann did not object to the absence of skull-caps as he, Kleinmann, perhaps felt that the wearing of such a cap to hide his highly-noticeable hair might accentuate his 'icy-blue staring eyes', as Valerie had described them. I can't disagree with Woffinden, who said that Kleinmann's performance at the parade was not, quote, 'a landmark of legal representation'. Sherrard, naturally, argued that the parade was unfair even if legal, but the jury were plainly not convinced.

    I would suggest that had the judge felt that Valerie's picking-out of another man at the first parade to be worthy of further consideration, he would have commented upon it. Which, I think, he did not do.

    Graham
    We are suffering from a plethora of surmise, conjecture and hypothesis. - Sherlock Holmes, The Adventure Of Silver Blaze

    Comment


    • The only comment the judge could have made as regards the first ID parade would have been to remind the jury that VS had chosen an innocent man.

      This fact could, and in my view should, have rendered any further identifications to be worthless, and I agree entirely with OR's observations on this point.

      It should not be overlooked that had the poor fellow chosen on the first ID parade not been able to provide a sound alibi for the murder night, he could have hung. In other words on one (and in my view two) occasion VS picked an entirely innocent man even though she knew he could go to the gallows.

      I am not for one moment saying she deliberately chose the wrong man. What I do say is that she was incapable of picking out anyone who committed the crime as demonstrated by her first choice.

      Ansonman

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Graham View Post
        ...For my part, I believe that on the occasion of the first ID parade, Valerie felt she had to pick someone out, and decided on Clark...
        At trial, on 24th January, Ms Storie, under oath, was thus cross-examined by Mr Sherrard:
        MS) Did you understand that it was your duty, on the first parade, not to point to anyone unless you were satisfied in your mind that he was your assailant?
        VS) Yes
        MS) Apparently you were satisfied enough on that occasion to make the identification without hearing the men speak?
        VS) Yes.
        MS) Can you tell us now what that man looked like?
        VS) No.
        My view is that Valerie Storie did not have any idea what her assailant looked like never mind what he sounded like.

        Del

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Graham View Post
          ...It was obviously not against the law at the time that another ID parade, this time including Hanratty, was organised, at which Valerie was in no doubt at all. The rest is history...
          The 1958 Home Office Circular of 1958 - Crime and Kindred Matters (Guidance on identification evidence) says in the 1st paragraph;
          When arrangements are made for a personal identification every precaution should be taken (a) to exclude any suspicion of unfairness or risk or erroneous identification through the witnesses' attention being directed to the suspected person in particular instead of indifferently to all the persons being paraded, and (b) to make sure that the witnesses' ability to recognise the accused has been fairly and adequately tested.

          Comment


          • My view is that Valerie Storie did not have any idea what her assailant looked like never mind what he sounded like.
            So if, as you appear to suggest, Valerie's identification of Hanratty at the second parade was purely random, how did his DNA get onto her underwear and also on the hankie found around the gun on the bus? Amazing coincidence, or what?

            Ref: your second post, Hanratty had legal representation in the shape of Mr Kleinmann at the second parade, and Mr Kleinmann made no serious objection to the ensuing procedure. Whether 55 years later we like it or not, that is the case.

            Graham
            We are suffering from a plethora of surmise, conjecture and hypothesis. - Sherlock Holmes, The Adventure Of Silver Blaze

            Comment


            • The first and false identification by Valerie Storie must have reduced the probative value of the second identification. The jury were made aware of this. They were also warned of the danger of convicting on identification evidence.Yet they were convinced Hanratty did it and the DNA evidence tends to confirm that they were right.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by ansonman View Post
                It should not be overlooked that had the poor fellow chosen on the first ID parade not been able to provide a sound alibi for the murder night, he could have hung. In other words on one (and in my view two) occasion VS picked an entirely innocent man even though she knew he could go to the gallows.

                Ansonman
                No, that's quite wrong, Ansonman.

                There was only one man identified by the police as a suspect on each parade: the first time it was Alphon; the second time it was Hanratty.

                All others on an ID parade attend voluntarily (or so I believe) and cannot therefore suddenly become suspects, or be obliged to produce an alibi, in the event that a witness picks them out by mistake. Valerie was a bright woman and would surely not have feared any such consequences. She would only have feared not picking out the man who might then have been free to offend again, destroying further lives.

                No way could anyone have been hanged (not 'hung') in such circumstances. The suspect would either be charged if picked, or let go if not. Anyone else would be free to go. You'd never get anyone to take part otherwise!

                Love,

                Caz
                X
                "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious." Peter Ustinov


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                • ID Parade

                  I took part in an ID parade in the early 1990s. Two of the witnesses picked the same innocent volunteer and only one, a policeman (the other two were civilians), picked the suspect. Needless to say the volunteer did not get arrested just because 2/3 of the witnesses picked him out!

                  Comment


                  • I may have mentioned this before, but I had a (now deceased) friend who was a member of an ex-servicemen's club in the Midlands. This was a favourite place for the police to seek volunteers for i.d. parades, and my friend said he was on at least one. I don't think he was ever picked out, but he did say a couple of his pals were, which might have come as a bit of a shock at the time, but there was never any question whatsoever that these volunteers could face questioning by the police. There was a modest fee paid to the volunteers, who doubtless all went back to the club and put it over the bar.

                    Graham
                    We are suffering from a plethora of surmise, conjecture and hypothesis. - Sherlock Holmes, The Adventure Of Silver Blaze

                    Comment


                    • The contrived Horseferry Road case had nothing to do with leaflets, anti-Semitic or otherwise. I suggest you do some proper research rather than simply surfing sites of dubious merit.

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