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If you could solve any non-JTR mystery which would it be?

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  • #76
    Were you in the British air force Graham?
    Nein, mein freund!

    I wasn't born until after WW2 ended. The guy who told me that story was a rarity in himself - a rear-gunner who survived the War. I had no reason to believe he was shooting me a line.

    Graham
    We are suffering from a plethora of surmise, conjecture and hypothesis. - Sherlock Holmes, The Adventure Of Silver Blaze

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    • #77
      Originally posted by Graham View Post
      One of my older colleagues at the time of my first job (in 1963) was former RAF bomber crew. He told me that another crew at one of the bases he served at got badly shot up over Germany one night, and it was obvious that the pilot was wounded but stated he was still capable of flying the aircraft. They got back to base OK, made a good landing, but when another relieved crewman went to offer his congratulations he found the pilot stone dead at the controls.
      He just did what he had to do.....

      Graham
      I heard the same story from an old bloke who was also retired RAF.
      G U T

      There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

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      • #78
        I've heard a number of similar stories, but have no reason to doubt them. People who have been horribly injured can hang onto consciousness and life by sheer willpower when something important, such as the lives of their mates, depends on them putting off death for a little bit.
        - Ginger

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Ginger View Post
          I've heard a number of similar stories, but have no reason to doubt them. People who have been horribly injured can hang onto consciousness and life by sheer willpower when something important, such as the lives of their mates, depends on them putting off death for a little bit.
          I recall another case that shows the power of human endurance. A couple were attacked with an axe while they slept. Despite suffering a fatal head-wound, the husband got up and went about his usual morning routine before he inevitably pegged it. His wife, however, survived the attack but was left disfigured. Their son was bang to rights as the murderer and I think he was prosecuted, but the mother refuses to believe he did it.

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          • #80
            Originally posted by Harry D View Post
            I recall another case that shows the power of human endurance. A couple were attacked with an axe while they slept. Despite suffering a fatal head-wound, the husband got up and went about his usual morning routine before he inevitably pegged it. His wife, however, survived the attack but was left disfigured. Their son was bang to rights as the murderer and I think he was prosecuted, but the mother refuses to believe he did it.
            In the 1905 case of the Stratton Brothers (the case that established fingerprinting as a tool against criminals in England), they had attacked the couple who ran a small shop just before it opened, and killed both, but the husband (despite horrible wounds to his head) managed to open the shop door, possibly to see if the killers were still on the street. When he saw they weren't he shut the door, and shortly after died. A number of passers-by saw him in his state, and the police soon arrived.

            Jeff

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            • #81
              I have noticed this as well, it's annoying!

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              • #82
                Case I'd most like to see solved

                Definitely the Lindbergh kidnapping and murder. I think the extortion was separate from the kidnapping, and Fisch and possibly Hauptmann took part in that. Thanks to Lindbergh, the symbol on the ransom note found in the nursery was circulating in the underworld very quickly, so it was very easy for someone to fake letters. IMO much of the evidence against Hauptmann was faked by the police, i.e. the attic board, Condon's phone # in a closet. (Someone on this thread mentioned that Hauptmann had held up a woman and a baby in Germany--I think it was actually a woman pushing a baby carriage in the days when inflation required Germans to pay for groceries with enormous amounts of cash.) Lindbergh's behaviour throughout was suspicious, and the revelation of his post-war secret families indicates the big divide between his public persona/real self. He was notorious for cruel and life-threatening "jokes": one of Betty Gow's first actions was to ask him if he had the baby and there is a claim that he had hidden the baby in a closet previously and put the household in an uproar. He claimed to have heard a noise like an orange crate breaking (which he didn't investigate) and testified that Hauptmann's voice was the same as Cemetery John's (having heard him say 3 words several years before)--odds are that his hearing had been badly damaged through years of unprotected open-cockpit flying. Many are of the opinion that Lindbergh's testimony put the final nail in Hauptmann's coffin. IMO Lindbergh is an excellent suspect.

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