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  • #76
    Originally posted by GBinOz View Post
    Hi Herlock,

    Belated birthday greetings for your 57th yesterday. I hate to be the bearer of sad tidings, but it's all downhill from here mate. Enjoy it while you can.

    Cheers, George
    Hi George,

    Have I added some incorrect info somewhere on here George? My birthday is actually in December (although I will be 57)

    I don’t mind being younger but adding 8 months isn’t on.
    Regards

    Sir Herlock Sholmes

    “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
      hi herlock
      love this thread!

      im an avid reader and my library has over five hundred books. im reading anywhere from 3-5 books at any one time and if its good ill read a book in one to three sittings over the course of a couple days. all genres but i lean towards non fiction as i get older.

      since this is a true crime site i will recommend one of the best and craziest unsolved serial murder mysteries of all time:

      The Monster of Florence

      its got so many twists and turns even the author was arrested at one point!

      some other greats:

      Helter Skelter
      Zodiac
      Ill be gone in the Dark (the golden state killer)
      Mindhunter
      Lost Girls (LISK)
      Lobster Boy

      The Amityville Horror is one of the greatest page turners ive ever read. did it one sitting in sixth grade literally under the covers with the flashlight.

      not recommended:
      cornholes sickert book what a load of garbage. i tossed in tje circular file half way through the third chapter.
      Devil in the white city. Boooooooooring
      Hi Abby / Herlock!

      I looked on Amazon and can see a couple of different books about the Monster of Florence.

      Please can you clarify which one it is that you're recommending, and I'll look at ordering a copy.

      Many thanks!

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by Ms Diddles View Post

        Hi Abby / Herlock!

        I looked on Amazon and can see a couple of different books about the Monster of Florence.

        Please can you clarify which one it is that you're recommending, and I'll look at ordering a copy.

        Many thanks!
        the one by preston amd spezi
        "Is all that we see or seem
        but a dream within a dream?"

        -Edgar Allan Poe


        "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
        quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

        -Frederick G. Abberline

        Comment


        • #79
          I'm sure many of you will have read this already, but I have recently finished Judith Walkowitz's City of Dreadful Delight (as recommended by Dr Strange on another thread).

          I really enjoyed it and would highly recommend.

          It looks at the social context of the Whitechapel murders from a feminist perspective, in terms of the media and social movements of the time, and concludes with an epilogue examining reactions to the Yorkshire Ripper case, with an analysis of how things have changed in the intervening century.

          It's quite a scholarly book, but very accessible and engaging.

          I thought it was very well researched and presented.

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

            the one by preston amd spezi
            Thanks Abby!

            I'll have a look for it now.

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by Ms Diddles View Post
              I'm sure many of you will have read this already, but I have recently finished Judith Walkowitz's City of Dreadful Delight (as recommended by Dr Strange on another thread).

              I really enjoyed it and would highly recommend.

              It looks at the social context of the Whitechapel murders from a feminist perspective, in terms of the media and social movements of the time, and concludes with an epilogue examining reactions to the Yorkshire Ripper case, with an analysis of how things have changed in the intervening century.

              It's quite a scholarly book, but very accessible and engaging.

              I thought it was very well researched and presented.

              Hello Ms D,

              Its not the first time that this has happened but I was about to post saying that I had this book. I was so convinced that I was picturing it on my shelves next to the Major Arthur Griffiths books for some reason, but it turns out that I don’t have it so it’s another added to my list of books to get so if you want to start a whip round I won’t complain. I notice that she’s also written a book called Prostitution and Victorian Society: Women, Class and the State.
              Regards

              Sir Herlock Sholmes

              “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

              Comment


              • #82
                Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

                Hello Ms D,

                Its not the first time that this has happened but I was about to post saying that I had this book. I was so convinced that I was picturing it on my shelves next to the Major Arthur Griffiths books for some reason, but it turns out that I don’t have it so it’s another added to my list of books to get so if you want to start a whip round I won’t complain. I notice that she’s also written a book called Prostitution and Victorian Society: Women, Class and the State.
                Ha!

                We could start a Just Giving page, although I'm not sure how sympathetic to our cause people would be!

                I suspect funding Ripperologist's literary addictions would be pretty low down on people's priority list!

                The Walkowitz books are indeed quite dear, but I'd say it's money well spent.

                Reading it threw up some aspects of the case which I had not previously considered, and I was relatively uninformed regarding WT Stead's "The Maiden Tribute to Modern Babylon" and it's ramifications prior to reading.

                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

                  Hi George,

                  Have I added some incorrect info somewhere on here George? My birthday is actually in December (although I will be 57)

                  I don’t mind being younger but adding 8 months isn’t on.
                  In an old post you announced your 55th. American dates. Oh well, very early birthday greetings then.

                  Cheers, George
                  “Contrariwise,” continued Tweedledee, “if it was so, it might be, and if it were so, it would be but as it isn’t, it ain’t. That’s logic.”

                  “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.” “How do you know I'm mad?” said Alice. “You must be,” said the Cat, or you wouldn't have come here.”

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    I would like to recommend the book, Bitten by Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Victorian Home by Lucinda Hawksley. The edition that I purchased is a reprint, but it is quite an interesting book. The textblock consists of examples of wallpapers that had been created using arsenic-based pigments, with the chapters' text placed between groupings the wallpapers. The chapters are narrower in width than the wallpaper exemplars themselves and that results in "newspaper" column-sized chapters. And, the font that is selected tends to cause my eyes to become weary, but I understand that all of this is an aesthetic choice.

                    That said, I have thoroughly enjoyed the book, and highly recommend it. Mrs. and Mr. Maybrick even make an appearance early on as a discussion on homicidal poisoning by arsenic. The book is engaging and is well referenced for a book that is more about the historical significance of the use of arsenic as a pigment, than about science, crime, or forensics. This is one of those books that has helped to illustrate a unique focus in toxicologic history for me, and it is a pleasure to hold and read.

                    I will include a link to Amazon and the publisher's sites with this brief post.

                    Cheers,
                    R

                    Bitten By Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Nineteenth-Century Home: Hawksley, Lucinda: 9780500518380: Amazon.com: Books

                    Thames & Hudson USA - Book - Bitten By Witch Fever: Wallpaper & Arsenic in the Nineteenth-Century Home (thamesandhudsonusa.com)

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Originally posted by GBinOz View Post

                      In an old post you announced your 55th. American dates. Oh well, very early birthday greetings then.

                      Cheers, George
                      The Queen has 2 birthdays so maybe I could too.
                      Regards

                      Sir Herlock Sholmes

                      “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

                        the one by preston amd spezi
                        I finished the Monster of Florence book.

                        What a strange, twisty-turny case!

                        I really enjoyed it, so thanks for the tip.

                        On a related note, this article appeared in the paper today.

                        https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...droidApp_Other

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Originally posted by Ms Diddles View Post

                          I finished the Monster of Florence book.

                          What a strange, twisty-turny case!

                          I really enjoyed it, so thanks for the tip.

                          On a related note, this article appeared in the paper today.

                          https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...droidApp_Other
                          yoir welcome! yeah it really is. ive got it with zodiac and the ripper as one of the weirdest, craziest and biggest unsolved serial murder cases. thanks for posting that article. not sure why the case would be closed to begin with.hopefully they will reopen and catch the bastard, but with the track record of the italian LE im not holding my breath.
                          "Is all that we see or seem
                          but a dream within a dream?"

                          -Edgar Allan Poe


                          "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                          quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                          -Frederick G. Abberline

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

                            That’s a strange story. Should be an interesting book.
                            Finished the book. A fascinating story. This guy was a hermit for 27 years. During that time he spoke once to a hiker he inadvertently met on the trail. He said "hi." That was the extent of his human interaction during that time. It was like being given insight into the mind of an alien. How could someone be so different from other human beings? Good book.

                            c.d.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Originally posted by c.d. View Post

                              Finished the book. A fascinating story. This guy was a hermit for 27 years. During that time he spoke once to a hiker he inadvertently met on the trail. He said "hi." That was the extent of his human interaction during that time. It was like being given insight into the mind of an alien. How could someone be so different from other human beings? Good book.

                              c.d.
                              which one?
                              "Is all that we see or seem
                              but a dream within a dream?"

                              -Edgar Allan Poe


                              "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                              quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                              -Frederick G. Abberline

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

                                which one?
                                Oops! I suppose the title would help.

                                "The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit" by Michael Finkel.

                                https://www.amazon.com/Stranger-Wood...%2C1903&sr=8-1

                                c.d.

                                Comment

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