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  • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post
    I’m going to recommend a book that I’m only half way through. It’s called Witchfinders by Malcolm Gaskill. Not surprisingly it’s about the Witchfinders of the Civil War era, notably Matthew Hopkins (of course) and John Stearne. This is a brilliantly written book that really evokes the atmosphere and paranoias of the time. A time when the supernatural (imps, and demons and witches) were an absolute reality to most people. At time when an unexplained illness or death could lead to an accusation and a trial. It reminded me a little of todays conspiracist paranoia and how it only takes one accusation against someone disliked. This is a cracker in my opinion.

    The reason that I recommended it before I’d finished it was for UK readers. If you have a branch of The Works in your local town pop in and have a look. They’re on sale there. Worth 3 of anyone’s money.
    Thanks, Herlock. That sounds interesting. Like the Bible says "seek and ye shall find."

    Here is a link to it on amazon:

    https://www.amazon.com/Witchfinders-...s%2C225&sr=8-1

    I also have a book on the Salem Witch Trials on my to read list.

    https://www.amazon.com/A-Delusion-of...s%2C101&sr=8-1

    This looks really interesting as well. What is so amazing is that this was going on late in the 19th century.

    https://www.amazon.com/Food-Dead-Tra...le%2C79&sr=1-1

    c.d.

    Comment


    • My next book is "D-Day: The Battle for Normandy" by Antony Beevor

      https://www.amazon.com/D-Day-Battle-...s%2C499&sr=8-6

      c.d.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by c.d. View Post
        My next book is "D-Day: The Battle for Normandy" by Antony Beevor

        https://www.amazon.com/D-Day-Battle-...s%2C499&sr=8-6

        c.d.
        Probably a safe bet, his book on Stalingrad was very good. He's got an accessible writing style.
        Thems the Vagaries.....

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Al Bundy's Eyes View Post

          Probably a safe bet, his book on Stalingrad was very good. He's got an accessible writing style.
          Yes, he has a number of books and they all seem to get good reviews.

          c.d.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by c.d. View Post

            Thanks, Herlock. That sounds interesting. Like the Bible says "seek and ye shall find."

            Here is a link to it on amazon:

            https://www.amazon.com/Witchfinders-...s%2C225&sr=8-1

            I also have a book on the Salem Witch Trials on my to read list.

            https://www.amazon.com/A-Delusion-of...s%2C101&sr=8-1

            This looks really interesting as well. What is so amazing is that this was going on late in the 19th century.

            https://www.amazon.com/Food-Dead-Tra...le%2C79&sr=1-1

            c.d.
            I’ve read one book on the Salem trials c.d. and checking online I’m pretty sure that it was this one (I have some books in boxes that I can’t access to check plus I’ve given some away to create space) I remember it being a good one though.

            Ive have this one on my ‘possible books to get’ list.

            https://www.amazon.co.uk/Witches-Jam...9954914X&psc=1
            Regards

            Sir Herlock Sholmes

            “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Al Bundy's Eyes View Post

              Probably a safe bet, his book on Stalingrad was very good. He's got an accessible writing style.
              I have a friend who’s into his WW2 history and he says that he’s a good writer on the subject.
              Regards

              Sir Herlock Sholmes

              “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post
                I’ve just started this book which I picked up on the shelf in Waterstones. It’s started really well.

                https://www.amazon.co.uk/We-Keep-Dea.../dp/1785151991
                I just finished the one above and it was a bit of a page turner with plenty of twists and turns with different suspects homing into view at various stages. Very well written. But.. a few of the reviews said that it was too long. I’ve heard this criticism about other books and a lot of the time I’ve disagreed with it (although imo some writers do tend to overpack books by telling a story and then adding a huge chapter where they trace the family back to the 15th century which has no connection to the events in question) Maybe this might have benefitted from being slightly shorter? I’m unsure. But don’t let that question put you off. It’s not as if the book is dull….it certainly isn’t.

                One reviewer though said:

                The only disappointment and this is no spoiler, is that there is no real conclusion.”

                Well, it’s not a spoiler because there was a conclusion. Perhaps he missed the part about the DNA identification and the announcement of the killer at a Press Conference. It makes you wonder if some people actually read the books that they’re reviewing.
                Last edited by Herlock Sholmes; 12-08-2022, 06:49 PM.
                Regards

                Sir Herlock Sholmes

                “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

                Comment


                • For those who enjoy a murder mystery, here are two books written by archaeologist, Francis Pryor, with backgrounds set against archaeological digs similar to the long running television show "Time Team". Pryor was a semi regular appearing on that programme.

                  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
                  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...oreType=ebooks
                  Why a four-year-old child could understand this report! Run out and find me a four-year-old child, I can't make head or tail of it.

                  Comment


                  • I’d seen those two books and Time Team was one of my favourite programmes but I never knew it was that Francis.
                    Regards

                    Sir Herlock Sholmes

                    “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

                    Comment


                    • Just finished an absolute classic. Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise And Fall of Jack Johnson. You won’t find a better biography than this one, especially if you like boxing history. Jack Johnson had a remarkable life. The Ken Burns documentary of the same name is also brilliant (as are all of his documentaries)
                      Regards

                      Sir Herlock Sholmes

                      “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post
                        Just finished an absolute classic. Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise And Fall of Jack Johnson. You won’t find a better biography than this one, especially if you like boxing history. Jack Johnson had a remarkable life. The Ken Burns documentary of the same name is also brilliant (as are all of his documentaries)
                        I'll check it out Herlock. One of the most iconic images of any boxing match, is the one that apparently shows Johnson shielding his eyes from the sun, while on the canvas during his fight with Jess Willard ( I think).
                        That particular argument still rumbles on to this day .

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by barnflatwyngarde View Post

                          I'll check it out Herlock. One of the most iconic images of any boxing match, is the one that apparently shows Johnson shielding his eyes from the sun, while on the canvas during his fight with Jess Willard ( I think).
                          That particular argument still rumbles on to this day .
                          It is Barn. Johnson claimed to the end that he threw the fight. Its a possibility but I don’t think we’ll ever know the truth. Johnson was winning for most of the fight but in that heat he began to tire. He was well known for not always training thoroughly when he was fighting someone that he expected to beat ( Johnson always expected to win) and I don’t think that there’s much doubt that a prime Johnson would have had little trouble beating Willard. But a guy around 35, poorly trained, known for partying and drinking to excess, fighting a much younger guy, not a good boxer but big and strong, Im unsure. He could have thrown it, he needed the cash, but it’s probably more likely that he just ran out of steam. Just before the end he asked a fried to take his wife out of the stadium. Did he expect trouble or did he just not want her to seem him on the canvas?

                          He was an inspiration to Ali. Before some fights Bundini Brown would shout “ghost in the house” meaning that the ghost of Jack Johnson was present. I’ve also got a book on John L. Sullivan on order. I like a bit of heavyweight boxing history.
                          Regards

                          Sir Herlock Sholmes

                          “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

                            It is Barn. Johnson claimed to the end that he threw the fight. Its a possibility but I don’t think we’ll ever know the truth. Johnson was winning for most of the fight but in that heat he began to tire. He was well known for not always training thoroughly when he was fighting someone that he expected to beat ( Johnson always expected to win) and I don’t think that there’s much doubt that a prime Johnson would have had little trouble beating Willard. But a guy around 35, poorly trained, known for partying and drinking to excess, fighting a much younger guy, not a good boxer but big and strong, Im unsure. He could have thrown it, he needed the cash, but it’s probably more likely that he just ran out of steam. Just before the end he asked a fried to take his wife out of the stadium. Did he expect trouble or did he just not want her to seem him on the canvas?

                            He was an inspiration to Ali. Before some fights Bundini Brown would shout “ghost in the house” meaning that the ghost of Jack Johnson was present. I’ve also got a book on John L. Sullivan on order. I like a bit of heavyweight boxing history.
                            Interesting stuff Herlock, thanks for this.

                            The best boxing book I have ever read, and I've read a few, is "King of the World" by Pulitzer winning author David Remnick.
                            It is a book that deals with certain aspects of Ali's career, but it covers so much more, it's a riveting read.

                            Here's the link.

                            https://www.amazon.co.uk/King-World-.../dp/0330371894

                            Comment


                            • Johnson was one of the greats and an absolute character. You are right that the Ken Burns documentary was really good.

                              c.d.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by c.d. View Post
                                Johnson was one of the greats and an absolute character. You are right that the Ken Burns documentary was really good.

                                c.d.
                                I’ve seen a few Ken Burns documentaries c.d. and every one has been brilliant especially the ones on The Civil War, Franklin and Roosevelt. The last series I watched was on Country Music and over Christmas the series on Jazz is being shown over here which I haven’t seen yet. Good stuff.
                                Regards

                                Sir Herlock Sholmes

                                “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”

                                Comment

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