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Coroner's report on Millwood's death

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  • Coroner's report on Millwood's death

    Just read the victim page on casebook re: Millwood's death. It states her death was caused by "sudden effusion into the pericardium from the rupture of the left pulmonary artery through ulceration."

    Please bear with me as I'm very new to all this, but could the ulceration be a result of the stab wounds, despite the wounds being in the lower torso. And if so, would the claim that her death was through natural causes be invalidated.

    Sorry, still really new to this, and have very little medical knowledge.

  • #2
    I always thought that a blood clot(s) and/or infection that were results of the stabbings were a much more likely cause of her death thus making her a murder victim. That her death one month after the attack was from natural causes would be a coincidence of monumental proportions.
    This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.

    Stan Reid

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sdreid View Post
      I always thought that a blood clot(s) and/or infection that were results of the stabbings were a much more likely cause of her death thus making her a murder victim. That her death one month after the attack was from natural causes would be a coincidence of monumental proportions.
      Could an ulcer be related to an infection?

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      • #4
        I'm not a doctor so correct me if I'm wrong but I would think it could. I do know that stomach ulcers are often caused by a bacteria called Helicopter pylori. Whether this can live in the blood stream, I don't know or it could have been some other injury introduced pathogen, perhaps.
        This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.

        Stan Reid

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by sdreid View Post
          I'm not a doctor so correct me if I'm wrong but I would think it could. I do know that stomach ulcers are often caused by a bacteria called Helicopter pylori. Whether this can live in the blood stream, I don't know or it could have been some other injury introduced pathogen, perhaps.
          Ok, thanks. So would that make the coroner's verdict incorrect? As she would have died as a result of deliberate injury, so therefore, murder?

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          • #6
            I think it would.
            This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.

            Stan Reid

            Comment


            • #7
              One detail that has been overlooked: Annie's post-mortem has been carried out by Dr Arthur.
              And this same Dr Arthur, if I'm correct, had previously discharged Annie as cured.
              Quite difficult for him to disavow himself.
              And probably Baxter saw no reasons to dig the matter. Annie was dead and his offender unknown.

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              • #8
                If Jack did attack Millwood (and I believe he did) and it is shown that she died of the stabbings, then Millwood could finally be classed as Jack's first murder victim. Interesting prospect.
                Best regards,
                Adam


                "They assumed Kelly was the last... they assumed wrong" - Me

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                • #9
                  Good Afternoon, Ladies and Gentlemen...
                  I find it interesting to read that, before the coroner's verdict was announced, it was assumed by some that her death was as a direct result of her wounds, perhaps delayed. In The Eastern Post & City Chronicle, Saturday, 7 April 1888 we are told the tale of
                  Annie Millwood, aged 38, a single woman, who is alleged to have been the victim of a most violent and brutal attack, and whose death is supposed to be due to injuries so inflicted.
                  Perhaps the common sense of the General Public's assumptions were more accurate than the coroners report?

                  The Jarvo

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jarvo View Post
                    Good Afternoon, Ladies and Gentlemen...
                    I find it interesting to read that, before the coroner's verdict was announced, it was assumed by some that her death was as a direct result of her wounds, perhaps delayed. In The Eastern Post & City Chronicle, Saturday, 7 April 1888 we are told the tale of

                    Perhaps the common sense of the General Public's assumptions were more accurate than the coroners report?

                    The Jarvo
                    Exactly so.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      This reeks the same problematic than the Horsnell beating. Since they had no chance of catching who did this, they called it "unrelated".

                      My main question is, why the interest in Emma Smith, but not Millwood.

                      Nobody saw any of the attacks, we only have the words of the victims.
                      Is it progress when a cannibal uses a fork?
                      - Stanislaw Jerzy Lee

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sdreid View Post
                        I'm not a doctor so correct me if I'm wrong but I would think it could. I do know that stomach ulcers are often caused by a bacteria called Helicopter pylori. Whether this can live in the blood stream, I don't know or it could have been some other injury introduced pathogen, perhaps.
                        That should have been Helicobacter pylori-I think spell check bit on that.
                        This my opinion and to the best of my knowledge, that is, if I'm not joking.

                        Stan Reid

                        Comment

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