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Could he have taken her blood?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by RockySullivan View Post
    Was it the Nichols murder where there was talk of blood stains being washed away or am I remembering wrong something I read on another thread
    You're not misremembering, Rocky. When Inspector Spratling arrived on the scene early that morning, he was just in time to see James Green (who worked in the nearby stables) washing away the blood.
    Kind regards, Sam Flynn

    "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by GUT View Post
      Now you want to bring the contemporary reports into it? Don't you know that nowadays you just make stuff up and ignore evidence.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
        You're not misremembering, Rocky. When Inspector Spratling arrived on the scene early that morning, he was just in time to see James Green (who worked in the nearby stables) washing away the blood.
        Thanks Sam. If Nichols had been killed and carried from somewhere would you think those stables would be the first place to start looking? Did they check them for blood? (Not saying this is what happened)

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        • #19
          Hello Rocky
          Originally posted by RockySullivan View Post
          If Nichols had been killed and carried from somewhere would you think those stables would be the first place to start looking? Did they check them for blood?
          Given the body's proximity to the stables, I'm sure the police would have checked then and similar properties in the vicinity. They're on record as having searched the nearby train tracks, so it's a fair bet that their approach was just as thorough elsewhere.
          Kind regards, Sam Flynn

          "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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          • #20
            An interesting line of inquiry to be sure but if one were building a woman from spare parts, wouldn't blood be the very last thing you would seek? By the next day it would have become clotted and virtually solid. The Torso Slayings happened largely after the canonical JtR murders so this fellow was going about his gruesome collecting bass ackwards.

            If I were building some Frankenstinian monster I would start with the larger body parts, move to the internal organs, and as my final stroke (so to speak) I would obtain the blood and use it immediately.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Penhalion View Post
              y the next day it would have become clotted and virtually solid.

              Perhaps, the killer was putting together a full English breakfast, with black pudding and kidney`s.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Defective Detective View Post
                There was enough saturation for PC Thain to get blood on his hands when he lifted her. However, I've seen it suggested that this blood would have come from the pool around her head .....

                Her back was bloody, and there was blood around the head, but not as much as one would expect.....
                Who suggested it, and who would expect?

                This reads like carefully chosen words in order to open the door to a theory,....that came to you in a dream?

                The blood soaked into her clothing, that's all there is to it.
                The only mystery is why anyone chooses to invent theories to argue otherwise.
                Regards, Jon S.

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                • #23
                  Victorian women wore voluminous clothing which would have absorbed a great deal of the blood. Important also to remember that the blood would cease to flow once the heart stopped beating, which may well have happened in seconds.

                  Besides, as Fisherman will doubtless confirm, there is no record of Lechmere approaching Paul with a jug of blood in his hand so it must have all stayed at the scene.
                  Regards, Bridewell.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Jon Guy View Post
                    Perhaps, the killer was putting together a full English breakfast, with black pudding and kidney`s.
                    G U T

                    There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Wickerman View Post
                      Who suggested it, and who would expect?

                      This reads like carefully chosen words in order to open the door to a theory,....that came to you in a dream?

                      The blood soaked into her clothing, that's all there is to it.
                      The only mystery is why anyone chooses to invent theories to argue otherwise.
                      I thought you'd know Jon "It's how it's done nowadays".
                      G U T

                      There are two ways to be fooled, one is to believe what isn't true, the other is to refuse to believe that which is true.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Bridewell View Post
                        Victorian women wore voluminous clothing which would have absorbed a great deal of the blood. Important also to remember that the blood would cease to flow once the heart stopped beating, which may well have happened in seconds.

                        Besides, as Fisherman will doubtless confirm, there is no record of Lechmere approaching Paul with a jug of blood in his hand so it must have all stayed at the scene.
                        It stayed at the scene, alright. Llewellyn said that nearly all the blood had emptied out of the arteries and veins and collected to a large part in the loose tissues of the abdomen.

                        So you are correct, Colin. The blood WAS left at the scene. A minor part under the neck and soaked into the ulster, but the major part of it inside the abdominal cavity.

                        The blood was thus accounted for, and not taken from the crime scene other than possibly in a very small amount.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Fisherman View Post
                          Llewellyn said that nearly all the blood had emptied out of the arteries and veins and collected to a large part in the loose tissues of the abdomen.
                          The accounts I've read only refer to the blood collecting "in the loose tissues", as opposed to the "loose tissues of the abdomen". Purely in the interests of accuracy, you understand.
                          Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                          "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                            The accounts I've read only refer to the blood collecting "in the loose tissues", as opposed to the "loose tissues of the abdomen". Purely in the interests of accuracy, you understand.
                            Of course I understand. It could be that all that blood that leaked out of the veins and arteries collected in the loose tissues of the cut neck too.

                            Of course. Accuracy first, Gareth. Always.

                            Never mind that other sources confirm my take:

                            "Dr. Llewellyn, however, is understood to have satisfied himself that the great quantity of blood which must have followed the gashes in the abdomen flowed into the abdominal cavity" (Pall Mall Gazette)

                            There are loose tissues in so many places, so how is one to know for sure?
                            Last edited by Fisherman; 08-14-2015, 12:30 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Fisherman View Post
                              Never mind that other sources confirm my take:

                              "Dr. Llewellyn, however, is understood to have satisfied himself that the great quantity of blood which must have followed the gashes in the abdomen flowed into the abdominal cavity" (Pall Mall Gazette)
                              Not too positive a confirmation, though, Fish. "Is understood to" ... "must have followed the gashes" all sounds rather non-committal, if you ask me. Still, it's good to see that the paragraph continues, "but he [Llewellyn] maintains his opinion that the first wounds were those in the throat".

                              So, re the subject of this thread, the throat would seem a more likely place for our putative blood-thief/vampire to have concentrated his efforts.
                              Kind regards, Sam Flynn

                              "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
                                Not too positive a confirmation, though, Fish. "Is understood to" ... "must have followed the gashes" all sounds rather non-committal, if you ask me. Still, it's good to see that the paragraph continues, "but he [Llewellyn] maintains his opinion that the first wounds were those in the throat".

                                So, re the subject of this thread, the throat would seem a more likely place for our putative blood-thief/vampire to have concentrated his efforts.
                                I find this a waste of time, Gareth, to be honest. If you want to think there were other loose tissues than the ones in the abdomen, where the blood was collected, then I think you need to specify them.

                                Or you can of course accept things as they are.
                                Last edited by Fisherman; 08-14-2015, 11:00 PM.

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