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Charles Lechmere interesting link

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  • Originally posted by Rob1n View Post
    Isn't it true to say that, whilst a murderer has a comfort zone he/she has a need to revisit the murder?

    A kind of morbid need to see and feel or re-live the moment, to watch the interest, I would imagine that Lechmere might well have stood by and watched the public interest in his "work".
    This will vary from killer to killer. Some will revisit their still unfound victims repeatedly, like Bundy and Shawcross for example. I´m sure there will be examples of killers who sneaked into the crowds of onlookers, but I cannot name such a serialist off the top of my head.

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    • Originally posted by Rob1n View Post
      Isn't it true to say that, whilst a murderer has a comfort zone he/she has a need to revisit the murder?
      Whilst it's quite possible, we must be wary of the assumption that all serial killers must behave in the same way. Almost by definition, these deviants have a tendency to break the "rules"
      Kind regards, Sam Flynn

      "Suche Nullen" (Nietzsche, Götzendämmerung, 1888)

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      • Originally posted by Fisherman View Post
        I think most serialists who stop - and I am convinced that they DO stop sooner or later if they are not caught and get to live to old age - do so on account of loosing the drive that originally set them off. The deciding factor, I believe, is tightly knit to sexuality. When it tapers off, so does the killing.

        In Lechmere´s case, there are murders that may have been his up til 1898 - and beyond. There are cases beyond the 1900 year mark that look promising too. I will not go into them here, though.
        So, in essence, he may well have not stopped but perhaps slowed down if the urge declined but he may have had the occasional urge to kill.

        As you say, there were "promising" cases beyond 1900, it's just hard to imagine how someone with such a destructive nature/ sexual perversion could either slow down or stop, it's likely that he did, in fact, carry on as you suggest but, with less drama or frequency.

        Truly, I'd like to believe we have our Man and, there is a lot to suggest that this is the one, silly as it sounds but, I was recently visiting all of the murder sites and most of them are being ruined/ built on which really is a shame I feel that we are losing the history of this event so, if Lechmere is the Man then, I would rather not find out for sure as I'd like to keep the mystery alive, I'm not sure that the feeling or emotions that I have when I walk the sites would be lost if we knew for sure he did it, I can remember walking through Mitre passage one dark damp winters morning (about 2am) thinking how this dark narrow passage might well have been just like it was in 1888, now that passage has been pulled down I have a sense of loss - we've lost a vital part of our history - yep, I'd rather not know for sure!

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        • Originally posted by Rob1n View Post
          So, in essence, he may well have not stopped but perhaps slowed down if the urge declined but he may have had the occasional urge to kill.

          As you say, there were "promising" cases beyond 1900, it's just hard to imagine how someone with such a destructive nature/ sexual perversion could either slow down or stop, it's likely that he did, in fact, carry on as you suggest but, with less drama or frequency.

          Truly, I'd like to believe we have our Man and, there is a lot to suggest that this is the one, silly as it sounds but, I was recently visiting all of the murder sites and most of them are being ruined/ built on which really is a shame I feel that we are losing the history of this event so, if Lechmere is the Man then, I would rather not find out for sure as I'd like to keep the mystery alive, I'm not sure that the feeling or emotions that I have when I walk the sites would be lost if we knew for sure he did it, I can remember walking through Mitre passage one dark damp winters morning (about 2am) thinking how this dark narrow passage might well have been just like it was in 1888, now that passage has been pulled down I have a sense of loss - we've lost a vital part of our history - yep, I'd rather not know for sure!
          If Lechmere is the killer, then to me, I find it vital to establish it, in order to give the victims some long forlorn justice.
          I agree that it is a strangely sad feeling to see the old sites go - I really cannot say why, because why would we NOT celebrate them going? They represent(ed) some very evil deeds, and in that sense, they are some very odd monuments of memory.

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          • Originally posted by Fisherman View Post
            If Lechmere is the killer, then to me, I find it vital to establish it, in order to give the victims some long forlorn justice.
            I agree that it is a strangely sad feeling to see the old sites go - I really cannot say why, because why would we NOT celebrate them going? They represent(ed) some very evil deeds, and in that sense, they are some very odd monuments of memory.
            Yes, we perhaps should establish his guilt, just for me, the mystery would go out of it all but, as you say, justice must prevail.

            There are many monuments in London and elsewhere that celebrate evil deeds but, this is history good or bad and the history of London is being eroded rapidly whilst we build more steel and glass offices, will the " Wilkie talkie" be a topic of discussion in 120 odd years time or, the "cheese grater"?

            We're not making much interesting history at the moment, let's try and keep what we've got.

            I do see your point though, of course.

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            • Originally posted by Rob1n View Post
              Yes, we perhaps should establish his guilt, just for me, the mystery would go out of it all but, as you say, justice must prevail.

              There are many monuments in London and elsewhere that celebrate evil deeds but, this is history good or bad and the history of London is being eroded rapidly whilst we build more steel and glass offices, will the " Wilkie talkie" be a topic of discussion in 120 odd years time or, the "cheese grater"?

              We're not making much interesting history at the moment, let's try and keep what we've got.

              I do see your point though, of course.
              As I said, I agree that it is a sad feeling to see so much of old London go. Then again, the Wentworth Model buildings we think quite atmospheric today (and where the apron piece was found after the Eddowes murder) was brand new when the Ripper spree occurred.
              The wave of time is a relentless piece of sandpaper, turning modern and new to old and outdated.

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              • Yes, can't argue with that.

                By the way, we all know I meant " WAlkie talkie" don't we? Damn predictive text.

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                • Originally posted by Rob1n View Post
                  Yes, can't argue with that.

                  By the way, we all know I meant " WAlkie talkie" don't we? Damn predictive text.
                  Haha! Yes, I sussed that out all by myself. But I´ve been completely fooled by my mobiles´ built-in inventive powers at times. One of my messages to my wife once came out as a claim that I was spending the evening with a less than respectable girl, while I was in fact speaking of a horse...

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