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Lechmere The Psychopath

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  • Originally posted by Harry D View Post
    36 Middlesex Street, which itself was a stone's throw from Goulston Street.
    Hi Harry. Levy is a viable suspect if not on everbodies list

    Steve

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Harry D View Post
      36 Middlesex Street, which itself was a stone's throw from Goulston Street.
      Thanks Harry
      I never considered Jacob levy a valid suspect before.Nothing ties him to the case. Until it was found that his cousin might be one of the mitre square witnesess.

      Has it been conclusively established they were cousins? if so that's a bigee for me-because now he does have an actual connection to the case, even if its peripheral.
      "Is all that we see or seem
      but a dream within a dream?"

      -Edgar Allan Poe


      "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
      quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

      -Frederick G. Abberline

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
        hi El

        well obviously the killer, in the lech scenario, would have not found them where their bodies were found, unless he knew and knew where Kelly lived, he would have found them in the street and gone with them to the murder site.

        I am assuming he found Nichols in Bucks Row but your point is valid to a degree.
        However if in the 3 casrs I mentioned someone had been found by another close to the body it would be far harder to explain that away as being a chance discovery on the way to work than is the case for Lechmere..


        No comprende-I have no idea what you are getting at with these two sentences-please explain.

        Stride was found on the return route of the club steward, who found the body and was accused of being a member of a gang of Rippers late last year.

        Eddowes to me is the only one who if someone was found close by may have a viable excuse of chance discovery. Ties in with my first point.


        well in this one case of Stride, OK AK also fits the bill, but not with all of them like Lech, no?


        Chapman only fits time wise if we accept the murder took place even earlier than Phillips suggests and we ignore all the witnesses.
        I don't think lech ties into Stride or Eddowes. The timing seems wrong to me. Heading towards Liverpool street after Stride seems illogical. Far better to have headed East and North surely given the time.

        However it's of course open to debate.



        Steve

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
          Thanks Harry
          I never considered Jacob levy a valid suspect before.Nothing ties him to the case. Until it was found that his cousin might be one of the mitre square witnesess.

          Has it been conclusively established they were cousins? if so that's a bigee for me-because now he does have an actual connection to the case, even if its peripheral.

          Abby the best info on him is in a copy of Ripperologist, gives the family links. Will see if I can find it for you.

          Steve

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Elamarna View Post
            Abby the best info on him is in a copy of Ripperologist, gives the family links. Will see if I can find it for you.

            Steve
            Hi Abby

            Edition 124.

            Steve

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
              Thanks Harry
              I never considered Jacob levy a valid suspect before.Nothing ties him to the case. Until it was found that his cousin might be one of the mitre square witnesess.

              Has it been conclusively established they were cousins? if so that's a bigee for me-because now he does have an actual connection to the case, even if its peripheral.
              Hi, Abby. I'm interested in your mentioning a "connection to the case" as a metric to determine validity as a "suspect". Obviously, you feel that Cross has a connection in that he was recorded as having discovered Nichols' body, he appeared at the inquest, etc., and thus you feel he's a valid suspect.

              I assume that you might initially view men like - to name only a few - John Richardson, George Hutchinson, perhaps Morris Eagle, and Joe Barnett with suspicion, as well. Perhaps excluding them for reasons that can't be applied to Cross. How is Cross a more likely killer than these men? What have you seen - beyond his connection to the case - that leads you to believe he may have been guilty of (at the very least) Nichols' murder?

              I'm interested because I put little stock in "connection to the case", that is unless the connection leads somewhere. I feel as if searching the ledger for the names of witnesses to cast as the killer leads to the same kind of thing - though often not nearly as absurd - we've seen with well known individuals of the time being placed "under suspicion. Prince Albert. Gull. Sickert. Carrol. Van Gough. For me it seems as if we become guilty of shrinking the our world to a handful of people, all known to us, either through celebrity or some "connection to the case". Forgetting that about six million people lived in and around London in 1888.

              My own perspective is quite different from yours. I feel as if "Jack the Ripper's" true name is one we haven't heard, and it's one we'll never learn. I'm far more intrigued by names that come to us because they committed violent acts, crimes, or were committed or incarcerated for mental illness. Then we search for connections to the case. A geographic connection. Some connection to a victim, etc. Names like Hyam Hyams. David Cohen. Kosmisky. Levy. These names hold more fascination for me than names like Lechmere. I put very little stock in ANY of them having been "the Ripper", but I still have some interest in them, if that makes sense.

              Thanks.
              Last edited by Patrick S; 07-17-2017, 10:06 AM.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Elamarna View Post
                post #1505

                "Were the abdominal wounds enough to kill? Probably, but in a timescale that would be longer than the neck"

                That is in line with what I posted in #1749.

                What Paul actually said was that potentially they could kill.

                "However he doubted that the Aorta and Vena Cava would have been cut because of the depth of wound needed.
                The other major vessels would in his opinion not kill fast enough to fit the time frame.

                Basically he considers death by the abdominal wounds more unlikely than the neck."


                How does that indicate an inability to read?


                steve
                Okay, this is in line with observations made by Dr Biggs. Thus in respect of Nichols Dr Biggs opined:

                "A severe abdominal wound would 'contribute' to the rapidity of bleeding to death, but this effect could range from almost negligible (if the neck wounds were so bad that death would have been very quick, and the abdominal wounds didn't hit anything major) to very great (if the neck wounds miraculously missed all the major vessels, and the abdominal wounds pranged something big.)" (Marriott, 2013.)

                Now, Paul has expressed doubt that something big was pranged, which I wrongly interpreted to mean unlikely, although, of course, doubt can simply mean uncertain.

                Nonetheless, as far as I'm aware, Dr Llewellyn doesn't mention serious damage to major vessels in the abdomen, I.e. the aorta and the inferior vena cava, which suggests to me that death was as a consequence of the neck rather than the abdominal wounds.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by John G View Post
                  Okay, this is in line with observations made by Dr Biggs. Thus in respect of Nichols Dr Biggs opined:

                  "A severe abdominal wound would 'contribute' to the rapidity of bleeding to death, but this effect could range from almost negligible (if the neck wounds were so bad that death would have been very quick, and the abdominal wounds didn't hit anything major) to very great (if the neck wounds miraculously missed all the major vessels, and the abdominal wounds pranged something big.)" (Marriott, 2013.)

                  Now, Paul has expressed doubt that something big was pranged, which I wrongly interpreted to mean unlikely, although, of course, doubt can simply mean uncertain.

                  Nonetheless, as far as I'm aware, Dr Llewellyn doesn't mention serious damage to major vessels in the abdomen, I.e. the aorta and the inferior vena cava, which suggests to me that death was as a consequence of the neck rather than the abdominal wounds.

                  John

                  I agree with that.


                  Steve

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Elamarna View Post
                    Hi Abby

                    Edition 124.

                    Steve
                    thanks el!
                    "Is all that we see or seem
                    but a dream within a dream?"

                    -Edgar Allan Poe


                    "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                    quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                    -Frederick G. Abberline

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Elamarna View Post
                      John

                      I agree with that.


                      Steve
                      Thanks Steve.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by John G View Post
                        Okay, this is in line with observations made by Dr Biggs. Thus in respect of Nichols Dr Biggs opined:

                        "A severe abdominal wound would 'contribute' to the rapidity of bleeding to death, but this effect could range from almost negligible (if the neck wounds were so bad that death would have been very quick, and the abdominal wounds didn't hit anything major) to very great (if the neck wounds miraculously missed all the major vessels, and the abdominal wounds pranged something big.)" (Marriott, 2013.)

                        Now, Paul has expressed doubt that something big was pranged, which I wrongly interpreted to mean unlikely, although, of course, doubt can simply mean uncertain.

                        Nonetheless, as far as I'm aware, Dr Llewellyn doesn't mention serious damage to major vessels in the abdomen, I.e. the aorta and the inferior vena cava, which suggests to me that death was as a consequence of the neck rather than the abdominal wounds.
                        If some cutting was interrupted it was not the cutting of the neck.

                        Pierre

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Pierre View Post
                          If some cutting was interrupted it was not the cutting of the neck.

                          Pierre
                          Hi Pierre. On what historical data do you base that assumption, please?

                          Best

                          HF

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Patrick S View Post
                            Hi, Abby. I'm interested in your mentioning a "connection to the case" as a metric to determine validity as a "suspect". Obviously, you feel that Cross has a connection in that he was recorded as having discovered Nichols' body, he appeared at the inquest, etc., and thus you feel he's a valid suspect.


                            My own perspective is quite different from yours. I feel as if "Jack the Ripper's" true name is one we haven't heard, and it's one we'll never learn. I'm far more intrigued by names that come to us because they committed violent acts, crimes, or were committed or incarcerated for mental illness. Then we search for connections to the case. A geographic connection. Some I'm interested because I put little stock in "connection to the case", that is unless the connection leads somewhere. I feel as if searching the ledger for the names of witnesses to cast as the killer leads to the same kind of thing - though often not nearly as absurd - we've seen with well known individuals of the time being placed "under suspicion. Prince Albert. Gull. Sickert. Carrol. Van Gough. For me it seems as if we become guilty of shrinking the our world to a handful of people, all known to us, either through celebrity or some "connection to the case". Forgetting that about six million people lived in and around London in 1888.

                            connection to a victim, etc. Names like Hyam Hyams. David Cohen. Kosmisky. Levy. These names hold more fascination for me than names like Lechmere. I put very little stock in ANY of them having been "the Ripper", but I still have some interest in them, if that makes sense.

                            Thanks.
                            Hi patrick

                            Hi, Abby. I'm interested in your mentioning a "connection to the case" as a metric to determine validity as a "suspect". Obviously, you feel that Cross has a connection in that he was recorded as having discovered Nichols' body, he appeared at the inquest, etc., and thus you feel he's a valid suspect.
                            yes. hes also the only witness/suspect whos seen near a victims body before he raises the alarm, has a discrepancy with a PC, used a different name, and has close geographic connection to the victims. as I think torso man and the ripper were more than likely the same person age wise he fits the bill for that also.

                            I think its very easy to pick any person out that has absolutely nothing to do with the case and fit them up to be the ripper. at the very least to me, before anything else, they need to have been proved to have at least been in London at the time, and secondly to have some sort of physical connection to the case to even consider them-but that's just me.

                            I assume that you might initially view men like - to name only a few - John Richardson, George Hutchinson, perhaps Morris Eagle, and Joe Barnett with suspicion, as well. Perhaps excluding them for reasons that can't be applied to Cross. How is Cross a more likely killer than these men? What have you seen - beyond his connection to the case - that leads you to believe he may have been guilty of (at the very least) Nichols' murder?
                            I absolutely consider men like Richardson, hutch and Barnett with suspicion. Hutch is 1a (along with blotchy-1b) as my favored suspects and Richardson and barnet in my second tier of possible candidates. don't know about eagle though-feel free to enlighten me about him though. I actually have lech on par with Richardson, but Barnett slightly above and hutch way above. as for reasons see above response.

                            I'm interested because I put little stock in "connection to the case", that is unless the connection leads somewhere. I feel as if searching the ledger for the names of witnesses to cast as the killer leads to the same kind of thing - though often not nearly as absurd - we've seen with well known individuals of the time being placed "under suspicion. Prince Albert. Gull. Sickert. Carrol. Van Gough. For me it seems as if we become guilty of shrinking the our world to a handful of people, all known to us, either through celebrity or some "connection to the case". Forgetting that about six million people lived in and around London in 1888.
                            the people you mention here have no connection to the case. the witnesses do. many killers, serial killers have initially only been thought of as witnesses and they turn out to be the killer. History has taught us this.

                            Along with that-They have the physical connection that puts them in whole different circle as the absurd suspects you mention or other non famous ones that you really cant tie to the case at all.

                            its also why I wouldn't even consider Jacob levy before it was discovered he might be related to one of the mitre square witnesses.

                            In his case it was the wild goose chase started by Anderson, via Fido, that I Think set too many people off looking for a crazy Jew to fit up as the ripper.

                            My own perspective is quite different from yours. I feel as if "Jack the Ripper's" true name is one we haven't heard, and it's one we'll never learn. I'm far more intrigued by names that come to us because they committed violent acts, crimes, or were committed or incarcerated for mental illness. Then we search for connections to the case. A geographic connection. Some connection to a victim, etc. Names like Hyam Hyams. David Cohen. Kosmisky. Levy. These names hold more fascination for me than names like Lechmere. I put very little stock in ANY of them having been "the Ripper", but I still have some interest in them, if that makes sense.
                            That's fine. and an interesting way to go-I fully embrace it. if it yields any connection. if not, I put almost zero credence in it. like I did with Levy-but now I do. Kos is in my first tier because he has a connection to the case-a possible ID and a suspect at the time. Cohen-no. too convoluted an idea. Hyam Hyams? enlighten me-why is he a suspect?
                            again a lot of the jewish suspects were found because of the witch hunt I believe started after Anderson and Fido. as you can see this aspect of suspectology sticks in my craw abit. sorry.
                            "Is all that we see or seem
                            but a dream within a dream?"

                            -Edgar Allan Poe


                            "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
                            quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

                            -Frederick G. Abberline

                            Comment


                            • How many known serial killers had a connection to the case before they were ultimately caught?

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Harry D View Post
                                How many known serial killers had a connection to the case before they were ultimately caught?
                                Good point Harry

                                Regards
                                Herlock
                                Regards

                                Herlock






                                "There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact!"

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