Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lechmere was Jack the Ripper

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
    they might if their already sick/weak, their throats cut severely, their midsection ripped open, internal organs taken, and there skirt thrown up on a chilly morning.

    not sure the good dr had that experience before and or accounted for it all.
    True, but the Doctors could tell Eddowes had been killed recently.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Jon Guy View Post
      True, but the Doctors could tell Eddowes had been killed recently.
      The evidence confirmed that. No need for a medical opinion

      www.trevormarriott.co.uk

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Jon Guy View Post
        True, but the Doctors could tell Eddowes had been killed recently.

        but we know, and they did then too, that's the case because of other witnesses/police beats
        "Is all that we see or seem
        but a dream within a dream?"

        -Edgar Allan Poe


        "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
        quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

        -Frederick G. Abberline

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
          but we know, and they did then too, that's the case because of other witnesses/police beats
          But the doctor still estimated TOD at the scene
          Because the body could have been killed earlier and dumped in Mitre Sq.

          Dr Brown: The body had been mutilated, and was quite warm - no rigor mortis. The crime must have been committed within half an hour, or certainly within forty minutes from the time when I saw the body.
          Last edited by Jon Guy; 08-29-2018, 09:05 AM. Reason: dr brown

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post
            they might if their already sick/weak, their throats cut severely, their midsection ripped open, internal organs taken, and there skirt thrown up on a chilly morning.

            not sure the good dr had that experience before and or accounted for it all.
            The temperature of the body will drop along a schedule that is no very much influenced by rippings and eviscerations, Abby. Take the thighs, the buttocks, the overarms, the back - all of these parts will store heat effectively and will not abandon it over the course of one hour only. Exposure to the elements will certainly have an influence - but Phillips knew that quite well too. He will have weighed it in.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Harry D View Post
              There's no way Richardson would've missed the body.

              This, coupled with Cadosch's evidence, puts the TOD later than Dr. Phillips' estimation.
              And that of Elizabeth Long/Darrell whose timing the coroner preferred to that of the police surgeon.
              "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Fisherman View Post
                Taking a quick look at Richardsons shoe again, I find that he says this at the inquest:

                "..... After cutting the leather off my boot I tied my boot up, and went out of the house into the market. I did not close the back door. It closed itself. I shut the front door.

                A claim for which there is actually supporting photographic evidence:-


                the door (assuming it was the original) was fitted with rising butt hinges.
                "It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (as Sherlock Holmes).

                Comment


                • Concerning Richardson, I made a crude drawing, depicting from above the part of the backyard with an 80 cm wide door, and Richardson sitting on the step. I have the door open, it is (of course) also 80 centimeters.
                  The door swung back on itīs hinges and closed itself, Richardson said, so it is reasonable to suggest that it would have leaned against him as he sat on the step.
                  I have him turned slightly to his right, since his interest was in the padlock on that side.
                  Behind the door, lying on the ground, I have drawn in a 160 centimeter figure with the legs drawn up.

                  Take a look at how much the door hides. From where he sits, it is impossible to see Chapman. And it is still kind of dark too!

                  Here is the link to my - crude - drawing:

                  https://ibb.co/mfMk3U
                  Last edited by Fisherman; 08-29-2018, 10:10 AM.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Bridewell View Post
                    And that of Elizabeth Long/Darrell whose timing the coroner preferred to that of the police surgeon.
                    The police themselves went with Phillips, Colin, as per Swansons report.

                    Comment


                    • The back door of 29 Hanbury Street opened outwards, right to left. Two stone steps led down from the passageway to the yard.

                      When open, the bottom of the door—level with the passageway at the top of the steps—sat about two feet above the level of the yard, and could not have obscured the body.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
                        The back door of 29 Hanbury Street opened outwards, right to left. Two stone steps led down from the passageway to the yard.

                        When open, the bottom of the door—level with the passageway at the top of the steps—sat about two feet above the level of the yard, and could not have obscured the body.
                        Take another look at my sketch, Simon. Richardson would have had to lean down to see under the door. And to be frank, just why would he do that? His focus was in the other direction. Furthermore, the lesser the door was swung open, the smaller the chance that Richardson would have seen anything at all but the stone steps underneath it - if he looked.

                        If, by chance, parts of Chapman could be seen down there, why would we suppose that Richardson would lean down, look to his left and try to make out what he could see between the doorblade and the steps in the murky morning light?

                        Is that the natural thing to do for somebody who comes to check a padlock in the opposite direction?

                        What I am saying is that there is no certainty at all that Richardson must have seen the body. That is a myth, one of many.

                        Normally I donīt agree with you over the perceived myths of the case. This time you disagree with me over one, it would seem. Funny, in a way.
                        Last edited by Fisherman; 08-29-2018, 10:49 AM.

                        Comment


                        • Let's agree to disagree.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
                            Let's agree to disagree.
                            Or disagree to agree, perhaps?

                            Comment


                            • Fish, does your drawing take into account Inspector Chandler's inquest evidence;

                              "Her head was towards the back wall of the house, nearly two feet from the wall, at the bottom of the steps, but six or nine inches away from them."

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
                                Fish, does your drawing take into account Inspector Chandler's inquest evidence;

                                "Her head was towards the back wall of the house, nearly two feet from the wall, at the bottom of the steps, but six or nine inches away from them."
                                Nope - I didnīt remember that. Then again, I had her 160 centimeters tall, and she was but 152!
                                Even if we move her out somewhat, she will still be obscured by the door, Joshua. And of course, the door angle may have been acuter too. There are plenty of viable angles that support the view that she may have actually have been out of sight for Richardson.

                                I donīt think anybody has made this kind of drawing before. It is quite instrumental in explaining how Richardson could well have missed her, I believe.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X