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  • #16
    Originally posted by JtRMordke View Post
    Due to various sources, there is strong indication that Aaron Kozminski worked in Butcher's Row
    What are these 'various sources'?
    allisvanityandvexationofspirit

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    • #17
      Stephen, the sources that I am talking about are highlighted in chapter 20 of Rob Houseís excellent new book on Kozminski. These come from Inspector Robert Sagarís memoirs and there are hints from Coxís account as well of Kozminskiís workplace. None of them directly mention Kozminski, but it is clear that he is more likely than not to be the suspect they are both referring to based on what we know about Kozminski already and how well it would fit with other suspects. Sorry for not being clear on that.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by JtRMordke View Post
        Stephen, the sources that I am talking about are highlighted in chapter 20 of Rob House’s excellent new book on Kozminski. These come from Inspector Robert Sagar’s memoirs and there are hints from Cox’s account as well of Kozminski’s workplace. None of them directly mention Kozminski, but it is clear that he is more likely than not to be the suspect they are both referring to based on what we know about Kozminski already and how well it would fit with other suspects. Sorry for not being clear on that.
        The snag with this is that one of the newspaper articles about Sagar that have recently come to light does say specifically that his suspect was a butcher (Seattle Daily Times, 4 February 1905).

        Regarding the Kallin and Radin hairdressers' shop, that was certainly on Aldgate High Street, but it was on the north side. Strictly Butchers' Row described part of the south side only.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JtRMordke View Post
          Due to various sources, there is strong indication that Aaron Kozminski worked in Butcher's Row, although no direct evidence has been found.
          If you recall the words of Det. Harry Cox, "..we had many people under observation while the murders were being perpetrated...", there's no clear indication that Det. Robert Sagar was observing Kosminski, thats the problem with the Butchers Row reference, it could have been anybody.

          ...we can be pretty sure that he was employed either only in Poland or in his early years living in Whitechapel.
          I think Aaron emigrated to the UK in 1881, he was only 16 at the time, so if he was employed in Poland it may only have been as a minor, an assistant.
          There is the reference to him being a Tailor (tailor's assistant?) in Poland.

          Regards, Jon S.
          Regards, Jon S.

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          • #20
            Thanks for clearing that up for me. I don't have access to the direct sources so I can only go on what others have researched. It is always so easy to speculate on things and quite often books will only tell you parts of the story/ information.

            About that tailor reference; it would most likely have been when Aaron was just 10 years old or after his father died when he was forced into supporting his family since it would have been only him and Woolf (the only boys present in the house) who were able to work. Also it was not uncommon for young Jewish boys to be working at a young age.

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            • #21
              It seems that in spite of all the speculation about Kosminski's handiness with knives, Macnaghten considered both Druitt and Ostrog to be eminently better qualified, mistakenly describing them both as doctors.

              He described Ostrog's antecedents as being of the worst possible type, which seems to suggest that, unlike Druitt, Ostrog did not come from a long line of doctors - unless they were all criminals like him.

              Ostrog was reported to have been Jewish, which should make him an ideal suspect for some, except that he was arrested in France on 26 July 1888, held in custody for the duration of the Whitechapel murders, and sentenced to two years in prison on 18 November 1888.

              And I dare say that if Philip Sugden had not discovered his whereabouts at the time of the murders, we would be seeing that well-worn assertion he had no alibi being applied to him too.
              Last edited by PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR 1; 05-05-2023, 08:14 PM.

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