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  • Wasn't Eade's man identified as John (or Henry, depending on reports) James, and found to be a harmless and innocent lunatic?

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Wickerman View Post

      Thankyou Jerry, yes this character completely slipped my mind. Another poster (was it George?) also reminded me of the same man just recently.
      Walking with an awkward gait, or limp, may not be so unusual in the East end but it does set him apart from the general public at least.

      I had located a report where a man wearing white overalls was arrested.

      "An arrest has been made at bow, but whether it has any important bearing on the case has not transpired. The particulars connected with the arrest are as follow: - At about nine o'clock yesterday morning a man entered the Gordon Chambers - a lodging-house near Bow Church - and asked permission for a wash. This was granted him. He was afterwards observed to take off a pair of white overalls, and then seen to be drying his waistcoat by the fire, a stain having apparently been washed out from the garment. Afterwards he offered to sell the overalls for 3d. This offer receiving no response he went out. He, however, returned at midnight, this time being quite differently attired. The authorities of the house had now become suspicious, and they communicated with the police, with the result that the man was arrested at about one o'clock this morning, he being conveyed to the Bow-road Station. At that time there was no evidence against him beyond the suspicion resulting from his conduct."
      https://www.casebook.org/press_repor.../18881023.html

      The trouble is, if I'm not mistaken, boiler makers or train Engineers did wear white overalls at the time. It might seem unusual to us in our day, but may have been a daily sight for people in the late 19th century.
      The actions of the man do seem suspicious though, plus the awkward way of walking. Yes, I should add him to the list, I forgot all about him last night when I posted.
      Hi Jon,

      Here's another involving white overalls, and staring eyes and a shiny black bag thrown in for good measure.

      "At any rate, upon that Saturday night, at five minutes to eleven o'clock, a man corresponding with the description given by Packer of the individual who purchased the grapes in Berner-street, called at the shop, which is on the left of a covered yard, usually occupied by barrows, which are let out on hire. He was in a hurry, and he asked for a pennyworth of milk, with which he was served, and he drank it down at a gulp. Asking permission to go into the yard or shed, he went there, but the dairyman caught a glimpse of something white, and, having suspicions, he rejoined the man in the shed, and was surprised to observe that he had covered up his trousers with a pair of white over-alls, such as engineers wear. The man had a staring look, and appeared greatly agitated. He made a movement forward, and the brim of his hard felt hat struck the dairyman, who is therefore sure of the kind that he was wearing. In a hurried manner the stranger took out of a black shiny bag, which was on the ground, a white jacket and rapidly put it on, completely hiding his cutaway black coat, remarking meanwhile, "It's a dreadful murder, isn't it?" although the subject had not been previously mentioned. Without making a pause the suspicious person caught up his bag, which was still open, and rushed into the street, towards Shadwell, saying, "I think I've got a clue!" The matter was reported to the police, and although strict watch has been maintained for the reappearance of the man he has not been seen in the street since. He is said to have had a dark complexion, such as a seafaring man acquires. The style of collar that he was then wearing was of the turn-down pattern. He had no marked American accent, and his general appearance was that of a clerk or student whose beard had been allowed three days' growth. His hair was dark, and his eyes large and staring. The portrait gives, according to the statement of the witness, a good approximate idea of his look. The bag carried by the young man, whose age the dairyman places at twenty-eight, is stated to have been provided with a lock at the top, near the handle, and was made, as stated, of a black glistening material."

      Best regards, George
      “Contrariwise,” continued Tweedledee, “if it was so, it might be, and if it were so, it would be but as it isn’t, it ain’t. That’s logic.”

      “Oh, you can't help that,” said the Cat: “we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.” “How do you know I'm mad?” said Alice. “You must be,” said the Cat, or you wouldn't have come here.”

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Wickerman View Post
        Right there in the Nichol's inquest, is this the Britannia-man/BGB, again?

        Thomas Ede
        , a signalman in the employ of the East London Railway Company, said he saw a man with a knife on the morning of the 8th.
        The coroner was of opinion that this incident could have no reference to the present inquiry, as the 8th was the day of the Hanbury-street murder. He would, however, accept the evidence.
        Witness then said: On Saturday, the 8th inst., at noon, I was coming down the Cambridge-heath-road, and when near the Forester's Arms I saw a man on the other side of the street. His peculiar appearance made me take notice of him. He seemed to have a wooden arm. I watched him until level with the Forester's Arms, and then he put his hand to his trouser's pocket, and I saw about four inches of a knife. I followed him, but he quickened his pace, and I lost sight of him.
        Inspector Helson, in reply to the coroner, stated that the man had not been found.
        Witness described the man as 5 ft. 8 in. high, about thirty-five years of age, with a dark moustache and whiskers. He wore a double-peaked cap, a short dark brown jacket, and a pair of clean white overalls over dark trousers. The man walked as though he had a stiff knee, and he had a fearful look about the eyes. He seemed to be a mechanic.
        By the Jury: He was not a muscular man.

        Here is the Little Turner Street incident.

        News of the World
        7 October 1888

        THE MAN WITH THE BLACK BAG


        It is pointed out by the Daily Telegraph that a search for an individual answering to the description of the man seen talking to the Berner-Street victim shortly before she was murdered on Sunday morning has been made by the police in Whitechapel ever since Saturday, September 1, the day following the Bucks-row tragedy. Information was tendered at the King David's-land Police-station, at about that time, by a dairyman who has a place of business in Little Turner-street, Commercial-road. It may be recollected that on September 1, a desperate assault was reported to have been committed near the music-hall in Cambridgeheath-road, a man having seized a woman by the throat and dragged her down a court, where he was joined by a gang, one of whom laid a knife across the woman's throat, remarking, "We will serve you as we did the others". The particulars of this affair were subsequently stated to be untrue; but the milkman has reason to suppose that the outrage was actually perpetrated, and he suspects that the murderer of Mary Ann Nichols in Bucks-row had something to do with it. At any rate, upon that Saturday night at five minutes to 11, a man, corresponding with the description given by Packer of the individual who purchased the grapes in Berner-street, called at the shop, which is on the left of a covered yard, usually occupied by barrows let out for hire. He was in a hurry and he asked for a pennyworth of milk, with which he was served, and he drank it down at a gulp. Asking permission to go into the yard or shed, he went there, but the dairyman caught a glimpse of something white, and having suspicions, he rejoined the man in the shed and was surprised to observe that he had covered up his trousers with a pair of white overalls such as engineers wear. The man had a staring look and appeared greatly agitated. He made a movement forward and the brim of his hard felt hat struck the dairyman, who is, therefore, sure of the kind he was wearing.

        In a hurried manner the stranger took out of the black shiny bag, which was on the ground a white jacket and rapidly put it on completely hiding his cutaway black coat, remarking meanwhile, "It's a dreadful murder, isn't it?" Although the subject had not been previously mentioned. Without making a pause the suspicious person caught up his bag, which was still open, and ushered into the street, towards Shadwell, saying, "I think I have got a clue!" The matter was reported to the police and although a strict watch has been maintained for the reappearance of the man he has not been seen in the street since. He is said to have had a dark complexion, such as a seafaring man acquires. He had no marked American accent, and his general appearance was that of a clerk or student whose beard had been allowed three days' growth. His hair was dark and his eyes large and staring. The bag carried by the young man, whose age the dairyman places at 28, is stated to have been provided with a lock at the top, near the handle, and was made as stated of a black glistening material. In connection with the Whitechapel murders a black bag has been repeatedly mentioned.


        Here is Mrs. Paumiers Statement.


        Irish Times
        Dublin, Ireland
        Monday, 12 November 1888



        AN EXTRAORDINARY STATEMENT


        Mrs Paumier, a young woman who sells roasted chestnuts at the corner of Widegate street, a narrow thoroughfare about two minutes walk from the scene of the murder, told a reporter on Friday afternoon a story which appears to afford a clue to the murderer. She says that about 12 o'clock that morning a man dressed like a gentleman came to her and said, "I suppose you have heard about the murder in Dorset street?" She replied that she had, whereupon the man grinned and said, "I know more about it than you." He then stared into her face and ran down Sandy's row, another narrow thoroughfare which cuts across Widegate street. When he had got some way off, however, he turned back as if to see whether she was watching him, and then vanished. Mrs Paumier said the man had a black moustache, was about 5 ft 6 in high, and wore a black silk hat, a black coat, and speckled trousers. He also carried a black shiny bag about a foot in depth and a foot and a half in length. Mrs Paumier stated further that the same man accosted three young women, whom she knew, on Thursday night, and they chaffed him and asked him what he had in the bag, and he replied, "Something that the ladies don't like." One of the three women she named, Sarah Roney, a girl about twenty, states that she was with two other girls on Thursday night in Brushfield street, which is near Dorset street, when a man wearing a tall hat and a black coat, and carrying a black bag, came up to her and said, "Will you come with me?" She told him she would not, and asked him what he had in the bag, and he said, "Something the ladies don't like." He then walked away.



        Last edited by jerryd; 08-08-2022, 02:13 PM.

        Comment


        • Sorry George, our paths crossed on that one.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
            Wasn't Eade's man identified as John (or Henry, depending on reports) James, and found to be a harmless and innocent lunatic?
            Thankyou Joshua, do we have a press report on that?
            Regards, Jon S.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by jerryd View Post

              ..... Last, a man was seen in Gordon Chambers, Bow, taking off white overalls after cleaning a stain off them and trying to sell them. He was arrested.
              I looked where Bow Church is, about 3-4 km east of Whitechapel, along Whitechapel Road, which turns into Mile End Road. Just before you get to the A12.

              Regards, Jon S.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Wickerman View Post

                Thankyou Joshua, do we have a press report on that?
                Yes, several, from the last day of the inquest when Eade was recalled.

                Eg the MA 24 Sept;

                "Thomas Eades, the signalman who had previously deposed to having seen a man carrying a knife near the scene of the murder, was recalled and testified that since last giving evidence he had identified John James, of Hackney, as the man he had seen with the knife.

                The coroner observed that the man in question was a well known harmless lunatic, and then proceeded to sum up."

                Comment


                • Originally posted by jerryd View Post
                  ...... Mrs Paumier said the man had a black moustache, was about 5 ft 6 in high, and wore a black silk hat, a black coat, and speckled trousers. He also carried a black shiny bag about a foot in depth and a foot and a half in length. Mrs Paumier stated further that the same man accosted three young women, whom she knew, on Thursday night, and they chaffed him and asked him what he had in the bag, and he replied, "Something that the ladies don't like." One of the three women she named, Sarah Roney, a girl about twenty, states that she was with two other girls on Thursday night in Brushfield street, which is near Dorset street, when a man wearing a tall hat and a black coat, and carrying a black bag, came up to her and said, "Will you come with me?" She told him she would not, and asked him what he had in the bag, and he said, "Something the ladies don't like." He then walked away.[/I]
                  Thankyou Jerry, I notice this small piece published on the morning of the 10th.

                  A man was arrested late last night in Whitechapel on suspicion of being concerned in the murder. He was given into custody by some women as being a man who had accosted them on the previous night, and whose conduct was suspicious. He was taken to Commercial street Police station, followed by an immense crowd.
                  Daily News, 10 Nov. 1888.

                  Again, in the evening press.
                  At about half-past eight there was a big scene in Commercial Street. A tall middle-aged man with a dark moustache accosted two girls and spoke to them in a rather brutal way. One of them made a show of accompanying him, but as soon as she saw a policeman she gave him in custody. He was escorted by a howling mob to the police-station, where he was detained.
                  Stra, 10 Nov. 1888.

                  So, if it's the same man, he was arrested Friday night for accosting two females on Thursday evening.
                  I wonder if this was the result of the accosting of Sarah Roney?

                  Sarah Roney, a girl about 20 years of age, states that she was with two other girls on Thursday night in Brushfield street, which is near Dorset street, when a man, wearing a tall hat and a black coat, and carrying a black bag, came up to her and said, "Will you come with me?" She told him she would not, and asked him what he had in the bag, and he said, "Something the ladies don't like." He then walked away.

                  Sounds suspiciously like the man reported by Mrs Paumier (your earlier post).
                  Was this last arrest the reason the murders stopped?
                  The police now had his name, address & possibly, place of business.
                  Suspects normally were expected to supply that information before being released.
                  Regards, Jon S.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post

                    Yes, several, from the last day of the inquest when Eade was recalled.

                    Eg the MA 24 Sept;

                    "Thomas Eades, the signalman who had previously deposed to having seen a man carrying a knife near the scene of the murder, was recalled and testified that since last giving evidence he had identified John James, of Hackney, as the man he had seen with the knife.

                    The coroner observed that the man in question was a well known harmless lunatic, and then proceeded to sum up."
                    Thanks Joshua.

                    I read the MA, to see what happened to him, if he was sent to an asylum, but it looks like the court just let him go?

                    I'll check the Census to see if we can trace a John James.
                    Regards, Jon S.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Wickerman View Post

                      Thanks Joshua.

                      I read the MA, to see what happened to him, if he was sent to an asylum, but it looks like the court just let him go?

                      I'll check the Census to see if we can trace a John James.
                      Ok, but in the Times he is referred to as Henry James, so worth a search under that name too - athough they refer to Eade as William so maybe that reporter was not great at names...

                      Times "William Eade, recalled, stated he had since seen the man whom he saw with the knife near the Foresters'-hall. He had ascertained that his name was Henry James, and that he did not possess a wooden arm.

                      The CORONER said the man James had been seen, and been proved to be a well-known harmless lunatic. "

                      Daily News "Thomas Eade, who on a former occasion deposed that he had seen in Cambridge heath road on the 9th instant a suspicious looking man with a large knife partly concealed in his pocket, now said that the police had brought him face to face with the man in question.

                      The Coroner (Mr. Wynne E. Baxter) explained that the man whom the witness had considered suspicious in appearance was well known, and there was no doubt as to his innocence; so that the witness's evidence afforded no clue to the crime"

                      Daily Telegraph

                      "Signalman Eades was recalled to supplement his previous evidence to the effect that he had seen a man named John James carrying a knife near the scene of the murder. It transpired, however, that this man is a harmless lunatic who is well known in the neighbourhood."

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by GBinOz View Post

                        Hi Jon,

                        Here's another involving white overalls, and staring eyes and a shiny black bag thrown in for good measure.

                        "At any rate, upon that Saturday night, at five minutes to eleven o'clock, a man corresponding with the description given by Packer of the individual who purchased the grapes in Berner-street, called at the shop, which is on the left of a covered yard, usually occupied by barrows, which are let out on hire. He was in a hurry, and he asked for a pennyworth of milk, with which he was served, and he drank it down at a gulp. Asking permission to go into the yard or shed, he went there, but the dairyman caught a glimpse of something white, and, having suspicions, he rejoined the man in the shed, and was surprised to observe that he had covered up his trousers with a pair of white over-alls, such as engineers wear. The man had a staring look, and appeared greatly agitated. He made a movement forward, and the brim of his hard felt hat struck the dairyman, who is therefore sure of the kind that he was wearing. In a hurried manner the stranger took out of a black shiny bag, which was on the ground, a white jacket and rapidly put it on, completely hiding his cutaway black coat, remarking meanwhile, "It's a dreadful murder, isn't it?" although the subject had not been previously mentioned. Without making a pause the suspicious person caught up his bag, which was still open, and rushed into the street, towards Shadwell, saying, "I think I've got a clue!" The matter was reported to the police, and although strict watch has been maintained for the reappearance of the man he has not been seen in the street since. He is said to have had a dark complexion, such as a seafaring man acquires. The style of collar that he was then wearing was of the turn-down pattern. He had no marked American accent, and his general appearance was that of a clerk or student whose beard had been allowed three days' growth. His hair was dark, and his eyes large and staring. The portrait gives, according to the statement of the witness, a good approximate idea of his look. The bag carried by the young man, whose age the dairyman places at twenty-eight, is stated to have been provided with a lock at the top, near the handle, and was made, as stated, of a black glistening material."

                        Best regards, George
                        Hi, thankyou George.
                        I felt sure it was you that had raised this man up a few weeks back, I forget what we were talking about.
                        We might wonder if this is the same man (John James) seen by Thomas Ede?

                        A lunatic, carrying a long knife, who adopts different disguises, and covers his clothes with Engineers overalls, and they just let him go?
                        Regards, Jon S.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Joshua Rogan View Post

                          Ok, but in the Times he is referred to as Henry James, so worth a search under that name too - athough they refer to Eade as William so maybe that reporter was not great at names...

                          Times "William Eade, recalled, stated he had since seen the man whom he saw with the knife near the Foresters'-hall. He had ascertained that his name was Henry James, and that he did not possess a wooden arm.

                          The CORONER said the man James had been seen, and been proved to be a well-known harmless lunatic. "

                          Daily News "Thomas Eade, who on a former occasion deposed that he had seen in Cambridge heath road on the 9th instant a suspicious looking man with a large knife partly concealed in his pocket, now said that the police had brought him face to face with the man in question.

                          The Coroner (Mr. Wynne E. Baxter) explained that the man whom the witness had considered suspicious in appearance was well known, and there was no doubt as to his innocence; so that the witness's evidence afforded no clue to the crime"

                          Daily Telegraph

                          "Signalman Eades was recalled to supplement his previous evidence to the effect that he had seen a man named John James carrying a knife near the scene of the murder. It transpired, however, that this man is a harmless lunatic who is well known in the neighbourhood."
                          Thankyou Joshua.

                          We might be satisfied Mr James was harmless, but one may ask how they deduce a person who carries a long knife in public to be harmless?

                          Though Peter Sutcliffe was never certified to be a lunatic prior to the murders, he was interviewed nine times by police, and nine times judged to be innocent (harmless?), until the tenth time.

                          Regardless, if we can find John/Henry James in the Census, we might clarify the picture.
                          Regards, Jon S.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Wickerman View Post

                            Thankyou Joshua.

                            We might be satisfied Mr James was harmless, but one may ask how they deduce a person who carries a long knife in public to be harmless?

                            Though Peter Sutcliffe was never certified to be a lunatic prior to the murders, he was interviewed nine times by police, and nine times judged to be innocent (harmless?), until the tenth time.

                            Regardless, if we can find John/Henry James in the Census, we might clarify the picture.
                            Sutcliffe was interviewed nine times but for the most part he had good excuses for being seen in a certain area or he was alibied by his wife. I think it was his fifth interview that Andrew Laptew felt something amiss and was not happy at Sutcliffe and wanted him investigated further. He had been interviewed over the 5 note found in a victims purse, he had a gap in his teeth- one of the victims breasts had been biten by a man with a gap in his teeth, he was a lorry driver- engineering oil had been found on a victim, he wore Size 7 boots which they knew was the Rippers shoe size and he was eerily similar to a victims who had survived photofit. He was eliminated from enquiries because he didn't have a Geordie accent. The Police had him if they had not used the Geordie accent as an eliminator.

                            What is interesting though is when he was being initially questioned- before Police had found the hammer and screwdriver he had had on him the Detective from the Ripper squad was happy to sign off his release on bail for stealing number plates. He was overruled by the local Superintendent who wasn't happy with Sutcliffe. Next day they find they weapons and Sutcluffe has to confess.....

                            This is one of the reasons I think JTR must have been spoken to by Police. I think of Robert Napper as well who was on the Police radar. Dismissed as he was 6ft 2inches tall and a witness had described a man as 5ft 8inches. Asked to supply blood for testing against that found at murder scenes. He never showed up. Instead poor Colin Stagg was seen as the local weirdo and subjected to an horrific ordeal charged with a murder he knew nothing about due to being in the area at the time. Added to that a local man in the Yorkshire Ripper case(his name escapes me) was literally harassed by Police every time there was a murder. A bit of a loner and a weirdo known as a taxi man buy suspected of frequenting Prostitutes by Police.
                            Last edited by Sunny Delight; 08-08-2022, 06:42 PM.

                            Comment


                            • I was thinking, as this thread is also about Blotchy, we have never debated the story about the sighting of Mr Galloway. It's been mentioned before but never debated, that I know of.

                              From the Star, 16 Nov. 1888.
                              (Also, in the Evening News)

                              "Mr. Galloway, a clerk employed in the City, and living at Stepney, has made the following statement :- "As I was going down the Whitechapel-road in the early hours of Wednesday morning, on my way home, I saw a man coming in the opposite direction, about fifty yards away. We both crossed the road simultaneously, and came face to face. The man had a very frightened appearance, and glared at me as he passed. I was very much struck with his appearance, especially as he corresponded, in almost every particular, with the man described by Mary Ann Cox. He was short, stout, about 35 to 40 years of age.

                              His moustache, not a particularly heavy one, was of a carroty colour, and his face Blotchy through drink and dissipation. He wore a long, dirty brown overcoat, and altogether presented a most villainous appearance. I stood still and watched him. He darted back almost immediately to the other side of the road, and then, apparently to avoid a group of women a little further on, crossed the road again. I determined to follow him, and just before reaching the coffee-stall past the church he again crossed the road. On nearing George-yard he crossed over and entered a small court. He reappeared in a couple of minutes, crossed Whitechapel-road for the sixth time, and proceeded up Commercial-street.

                              Up to this time he had walked along briskly, but directly he got into Commercial-street, he slackened speed and accosted the first woman whom he met alone, but was repulsed. On approaching Thrawl-street a policeman on point duty suddenly appeared. The man was evidently startled, and for a moment it looked as though he would turn back or cross the road. He recovered himself, however, and went on. I then informed the constable of what I had seen, and pointed out the man's extraordinary resemblance to the individual described by Cox. The constable declined to arrest the man, saying that he was looking for a man of a very different appearance."



                              The following day, in the Evening News, we read:

                              "At midnight there was no one in custody in London in connection with the East-end murders. The police state that the man who aroused the suspicion of Mr. Galloway by frequently crossing and recrossing the road, is a respectable citizen, and that he was, as a matter of fact, acting in concert with them in his "mysterious movements." The streets of Whitechapel presented their normal appearance last night."

                              Anyone have any thoughts on what was going on here, and why?
                              Regards, Jon S.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Sunny Delight View Post
                                Sarah Lewis stating she saw a man and a woman in Dorset Street entering the Court at 2:30am surely would be hugely significant. A possible sighting of Kelly. Firstly the Police would have checked with every resident in the Court could it have been them. The tracking of this couple vital to taking the investigation forward.....
                                I just came across a very brief observation from an American newspaper. I don't normally read the American press as they often get facts so distorted but, in this case much of the article had to have been written by someone based in London, and telegraphed over.

                                Here though the journalist remarks on what occurred in Dorset St. leading up to the murder, bear in mind this was published in the US on the 10th.


                                The Boston Daily Globe.
                                London, Nov. 10.-The excitement here this morning over the lengthening series of Whitechapel atrocities is more intense than ever. The papers are having enormous sales, though they contain little besides speculation and rumors. Beyond the broad facts of this ninth atrocity, the police are endeavoring to keep everything secret.
                                The one question in everybody's mind is, Can the murderer of Mary Jane McCarthy or Kelly be found?

                                This is the problem before the London police, and the impression prevails that it will be answered negatively. But if so public indignation is likely to culminate in an overturning of the present police authorities.

                                Yet the Whitechapel monster left more tracks behind him in this than in any other previous butchery. He was seen by several persons.

                                As he was entering the small court which led to the dirty room where the crime was committed, both the man and Mary Jane stopped and laughed at a large poster which offers 100 reward for the Whitechapel murderer. A number of people who live in a lodging-house across the way noted the incident, and give this description of the man: About 30 years old, 5 feet 6 inches tall, wore speckled trousers and a black coat and respectable in appearance.

                                https://www.casebook.org/press_repor...g18881110.html

                                --------------------

                                As the above was published three days before Hutchinson's story was made public, it can only refer to the sighting described by Sarah Lewis.
                                There was a 'wanted' poster very close to Millers Court passage offering a reward for the murderer.
                                The witnesses referred to must have been in Crossingham's, directly opposite Millers Court.

                                Unfortunately no time is given, so we cannot be sure if this a sighting of Astrachan with Kelly about 2:30, or a sighting of the Britannia-man with Kelly after 3:00?

                                The estimated age (about 30) could be either, the estimated height (5ft 6 inch) also could be either.
                                Hutchinson described Astrachan's trousers as 'dark'.
                                Lewis described the Britannia-man's trousers as 'dark pepper & salt', whereas Kennedy said 'dark mixture'.
                                This might suggest the sighting is of the Britannia-man?, yet we know it was Hutchinson who said Astrachan & Kelly stopped and laughed, before they walked up the court.

                                What do you think?



                                Regards, Jon S.

                                Comment

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