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Joseph Moloney

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  • #16
    Jack was well-prepared, knew the area and police beats, was bold, strong and had excellent night vision

    The description of Moloney - from Wikipedia, articles and his book - matches the above description of Jack.

    Moloney was described as thick set and determined looking, had a taste for adventure and was as “hard as nails”.

    He was a member of the Royal Geographical Society, renown as an explorer of Africa, was an accomplished sportsman, yachtsman and a good shot (member of Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers).

    When Captain Boldon died, and Captain Stairs was incapacitated from illness, Moloney decisively took control of the Congo expedition.

    Moloney also had opinionated views, as David Saffery’s Introduction to “With Captain Stairs to Katanga” outlines :
    • “Moloney is an uneasy guide for a modern reader. Hostile towards black people, Jews and Germans, and demonstrating a patronising tolerance of the French, Moloney’s habitual use of the word ‘******’ was berated at the time of this book’s original publication by no less a critic than Henry Morton Stanley, who described it as ‘ugly and derisive”.
    • “Moloney’s bigotry and anti-Semitism pervade the narrative; perhaps unconsciously reflecting the desperate personal insecurity of a young, middle-class Irish Catholic attempting to build a career in a Victorian society where Catholics were still viewed with suspicion and mistrust”

    Jack may have targeted prostitutes as he caught syphilis from one

    Moloney's death certificate lists cause as “aortic disease” which is an aneurysm - a balloon like bulge in the artery which can rupture, causing internal bleeding and / or a stroke.

    In the Victorian era / early 20th Century (before penicillin was invented), syphilis was a frequent cause of aortic aneurysms.

    Wikipediadescribes how the syphilis infection inflames the outside layer of the blood vessels, thickening the walls and restricting blood flow, and leading to an aneurysm.

    “Aortic Aneurism in the Army”, a paper by Francis H. Welch in 1875, outlines how the increase of aortic aneurisms in soldiers is linked to the syphilis infection.

    Syphilitic aortitis occurs in the tertiary stage of syphilis, which is typically between 3 - 15 years after the initial infection. "Cardiovascular syphilis usually occurs 10–30 years after the initial infection. The most common complication is syphilitic aortitis, which may result in aortic aneurysm formation" Wikipedia

    As Moloney died in 1896, this supports the hypothesis that he may have caught syphilis from a prostitute in Whitechapel ten years earlier in 1886 which became his motive to kill.

    JTR had a triggering event in 1888 that was the catalyst for the murders and another reason to cease

    Joseph's father, Jeremiah, died (of bronchitis, aged 72 years) on August 20, 1888 which was 11 days before the first Ripper murder of Nichols on August 31. However, this was after the Tabram murder on August 7.

    Another possibility is that he caught syphilis from Mary Kelly, and the killings therefore finished once he killed her.

    Jack was motivated by a hatred of older, drunk, prostitutes

    Moloney provides some sexist and misogynist comments in his book :
    • “The Wagogo damsel assumes all the airs of an enchantress during the short season of her comeliness. As with most African tribes, this ceases with the twentieth year, and a female of thirty has degenerated into a repulsive crone. They seldom live later than sixty, and death must happen as a merciful release, since the thrifty community turns them out to starve when they can drudge no more”
    • “As for the women, they seemed a peculiarly slatternly and unwholesome set, wearing next to no clothing, and much addicted both to the smoking and chewing of tobacco"
    • "The women had a fair allowance of good looks, and wore spiral circlets round the neck and arms; but their morals were to seek. Curiously enough they did not eat goat-flesh or fowls; but whether from religious causes, or as a sign of their inferiority to the males, we were unable to discover."
    • “Accordingly she came to lay her grievances before the Great White Chief; and this she did with amazing volubility. The scene was amusingly reminiscent of an East End row; the same gestures, the same shrill invective on the part of the female, the same surly and brief rejoinders from the superior sex”

    These comments show a lack of respect for women.

    Tried to blame the jews or get them involved

    As mentioned above, Moloney was critical of the Jews in his book. It's possible he wrote "The juwes are the men who will not be blamed" to incite local rage.

    Comment


    • #17
      In summary, how does Moloney compare to the evidence criteria.
      • Was between 28 - 35 years old, around 5’7”, stout, had a moustache, fair complexion, “shabby genteel” or “clerk like”. Yes
      • Had a rural or hunting mindset (deerstalker hat)Likely
      • Had surgical skills Yes, he also was a Medical officer in Boer war
      • Was right-handed Unknown
      • Used a 6” thin, pointed knife (such as an amputation knife or a thin dagger) Likely
      • Blood choke strangled the victims (military skill?) Likely
      • Bled the victims (hunting or slaughter man skill?) Yes
      • Was a local No – lived at City of London – but visited East London often
      • Was single and had a daytime job Yes
      • May have targeted prostitutes as he caught syphilis from one Likely – died from “aortic disease” which was often caused by syphilis
      • Suffered a triggering event in 1888 and had another reason to cease Yes
      • Was motivated by a hatred of older, drunk, prostitutes Likely – book shows he was critical of women
      I think this is enough of a fit to justify further research. For example, it would be good to know where he lived in 1888 .

      Craig

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by GUT View Post

        But there being nothing to link him, doesn’t seem to stop about 90% of other suspects being named.
        Disagree gut, most of the major ripper suspects have some connection to the case.
        this guy isnt a ripper suspect.
        "Is all that we see or seem
        but a dream within a dream?"

        -Edgar Allan Poe


        "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
        quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

        -Frederick G. Abberline

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Harry D View Post
          Sorry, there is absolutely nothing to link this man to the case. Nada. It's just another example of plucking an historical figure and trying to cobble together a case against them on the flimsiest of pretences. I think what riles me most is that it runs the risk of tarring a man's memory as a ripper suspect without any merit.


          He was a medical officer who operated in South London. He wasn't even near Whitechapel. Does he match the descriptions? How many other men did? Did the killer definitely have surgical skill? There was no consensus on that.

          You're not likely to find the Ripper's identity already on wikipedia, frustrating as that may be.
          Agree harry. 100 percent.
          "Is all that we see or seem
          but a dream within a dream?"

          -Edgar Allan Poe


          "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
          quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

          -Frederick G. Abberline

          Comment


          • #20
            This seems like a data driven approach to identify a suspect, and not an evidence driven approach.

            Its an interesting idea.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

              Disagree gut, most of the major ripper suspects have some connection to the case.
              this guy isnt a ripper suspect.
              I think that is part of craigs point tho with all due respect abby, however some of the wiki reading indicating he was involved in expeditions sends me off maloney as a suspect(not sure why) maybe i need to read the guy in more detail.

              I have also toyed with the idea the ripper is none of the suspects and also could be from out of town whoever it was, maybe even was brought up in the area as a child and returned in some sort of vendetta for whatever reason or another abnormal reason, the canonical 5 murders were very sporadic except that they all occurred on weekends, the ripper knowing the area could also be wrong, dark and lots of lanes and turns, just walk and turn as if in a maze and you are way out of the murder scene quickly.

              I know there was a witness who apparently refused to testify but for all witnesses to not recognize someone seen with someone minutes before there death also raises questions, while experts mostly agree this was a local man then how did nobody recognize this person as a barber/ someones son/husband/ someone from the pub or the shop or even someone who chops up pigs for a living also opens the idea the ripper may have been from out of town.

              Is it not also a possibility gangs/and or landlords and pimps consorted and got a hit man in from out of town to wipe out 5 women as a message to what can happen if protection money is not paid.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Stacker View Post
                This seems like a data driven approach to identify a suspect, and not an evidence driven approach.

                Its an interesting idea.
                Hi Stacker

                There is a view that Jack the Ripper was not one of the known suspects but an "unknown local".

                That makes sense to me. I don't think suspects like Kominski, Druitt, etc match the profile of the Ripper based upon the evidence.

                What I tried to do was take a fresh view of start with what we think we know about the Ripper - that is, his age, profession, where he lived - and then get a short list of who it could be.

                While there's too many unknowns to say that Moloney was Jack, I wouldn't be surprised if Jack was someone who had a similar profile to Moloney

                All the best

                Craig

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Abby Normal View Post

                  Disagree gut, most of the major ripper suspects have some connection to the case.
                  this guy isnt a ripper suspect.
                  I have to agree with Abby. At this point in time there is no reason to name him as a suspect. The best that we can say at the moment (and I say ‘‘at the moment’’
                  because further research might indeed uncover some kind of link) is that he might be the type of person that the ripper was and we have nothing to exonerate him.

                  We might name him as someone worthy of further research though and who knows what might turn up?
                  Regards

                  Herlock






                  "There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact!"

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Craig H View Post
                    [B]

                    Moloney's death certificate lists cause as “aortic disease” which is an aneurysm - a balloon like bulge in the artery which can rupture, causing internal bleeding and / or a stroke.

                    In the Victorian era / early 20th Century (before penicillin was invented), syphilis was a frequent cause of aortic aneurysms.

                    Wikipediadescribes how the syphilis infection inflames the outside layer of the blood vessels, thickening the walls and restricting blood flow, and leading to an aneurysm.
                    Interesting reading, Craig. All of it. Well done on the research. I don't mean for you to take this personally, but I'm always a bit disappointed when I find a suspect is someone known to history... someone who has a Wikipedia page, etc. I'll say I'd find this man a lot more interesting if you turn up murdered women in the areas he's known to have traveled to at times he was likely there. Short of that, I remain of a mindset that tell me the killer wasn't someone on the current "roster" of suspects, he's not on Wikipedia. He wasn't a famous painter, author, royal, or former carnival attraction. A word on aneurysms......

                    I'm not saying the man didn't have syphilis. But, I will say that my grandfather had an aortic aneurysm. My father and his two brothers have stents in their aortas, because they have aortic aneurysms. It's not uncommon. It's known to be hereditary (so far, so good for me). Smoking is a contributing factor as well. Geroge C. Scott, Lucille Ball, Albert Einstein, Alan Thicke... all died of aortic aneurysms. None of them are known to have had syphilis. Oh... and as best I can tell my dad and uncles don't have syphilis, either.
                    Last edited by Patrick S; 04-12-2019, 01:44 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hi Patrick
                      Thanks for your feedback.
                      Yes - your comments on the causes of aortic disease makes sense.
                      Syphilitic aortitis is rare today since the invention of penicillin after WWII.
                      however the report I provided in my post - the Army study from 1875 - showed how syphillis was a main cause of aneurysms.
                      it surprised me
                      craig

                      Comment

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