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  • The preface to the Robinson booklet refers to Helen Jewett as "a Milwood." This seems to be a reference to the character Mrs. Millwood in a 1731 play by George Lillo, The London Merchant: Or, The History of George Barnwell.

    The Reader's Handbook of Famous Names in Fiction, Allusions, References, Proverbs, Plots, Stories, and Poems (Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1910), Page 191
    By Ebenezer Cobham Brewer

    Barnwell (George),tbe chief character and title of a tragedy by George Lillo. George Barnwell is a London apprentice, who falls in love with Sarah Millwood of Shoreditch, who leads him astray. He first robs his master of 200. He next robs his uncle, a rich grazier at Ludlow, and murders him. Having spent all the money of his iniquity, Sarah Millwood turns him off and informs against him. Both are executed (1732).

    For many years this play was acted on boxing-night, as a useful lesson to London apprentices.

    ----end

    A link to a 1906 edition of the play.

    The London Merchant: Or, The History of George Barnwell, and Fatal Curiosity (Boston: D. C. Heath, 1906), link
    by George Lillo



    Comment


    • Two of the quotes in the conversation from the Robinson booklet (“a marvellous proper man", “I could a tale unfold") are from Shakespeare.

      A Complete Concordance Or Verbal Index to Works, Phrases and Passages in the Dramatic Works of Shakespeare (London: Macmillan, 1894), Page 1226
      by John Bartlett

      She finds although I cannot, Myself to be a marvellous proper man. Richard III

      Page 1521

      I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thay soul. Hamlet


      For the quote “That sight is very sharp, I ween” I found something similar from the following poem.

      M'Fingal: A Modern Epic Poem in Four Cantos (Baltimore: A. Miltenberger, 1812), Page 10
      By John Trumbull

      For any man, with half an eye,
      What stands before him, may espy;
      But optics sharp it needs, I ween,
      To see what is not to be seen.

      ----end

      I find the quote “life in Lunnun [London]” used in a novel by Bulwer Lytton based upon a real murder case.

      Eugene Aram: A Tale, Volume 1 (New York: J & J Harper, 1832), link
      by Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton

      Page 171

      “Aughs" replied the corporal, “’tis a pleasant thing to look about un with all one’s eyes open; rogue here, rogue there—keeps one alive;-—life in Lunnun, life in a village-—all the difference 'twixt healthy walk, and a doze in armchair; by the faith of a man 'tis!"

      “What! it is pleasant to have rascals about one?”

      “Surely yes,” returned the corporal, dryly; “what so delightful like as to feel one's cliverness and 'bility all set an end—-bristling up like a porkypine; nothing makes a man tread so light, feel so proud, breathe so briskly, as the knowledge that he's all his wits about him, that he's a match for any one, that the Divil himself could not take him in. Augh that's what I calls the use of an immortal soul—-bother!”

      Eugene Aram: A Tale, Volume 2 (New York: J & J Harper, 1832), link


      A review of the novel.

      Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country, Volume 5, February, 1832, Pages 107-113

      A Good Tale Badly Told
      Last edited by TradeName; 02-04-2019, 03:57 AM.

      Comment


      • This books has accounts of some of the other rogues featured in the exhibition of wax figures.

        The Record of Crimes in the United States (Buffalo: H. Faxon & Co., 1834) Pages 13-41

        Charles Gibbs, alias James D. Jeffers with Notices of His Partner in Crime, Thomas J. Wansley


        Pages 116-129

        John Francis Knapp and Joseph Jenkins Knapp


        Pages 202-213

        Jesse Strang

        Link to another account of the pirate Gibbs.

        Mutiny and Murder: Confession of Charles Gibbs, a Native of Rhode Island (Providence: Israel Smith, 1831), link
        by Charles Gibbs

        Comment


        • Accounts of the Rev. E. K. Avery, another of the wax museum rogues. As with Robinson, Avery was acquitted.

          Trial of Rev. Mr. Avery: A Full Report of the Trial of Ephraim K. Avery (Boston: 1833), link
          by Benjamin Franklin Hallett


          A Vindication of the Result of the Trial of Rev. Ephraim K. Avery (Boston: Russell, Odiorne and Co., 1834), link
          by Timothy Merritt


          The Terrible Hay-stack Murder: Life and Trial of the Rev. Ephraim K. Avery (Philadelphia: Barclay & Co., 1876), link
          by Ephraim K. Avery


          A forensic textbook has a section on the evidence in the Avery case.

          Elements of Medical Jurisprudence, Volume 2 (Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott 1863, 12th ed.), Pages 196-199
          by Theodric Romeyn Beck, John Brodhead Beck

          Comment


          • Originally posted by TradeName View Post
            Accounts of the Rev. E. K. Avery, another of the wax museum rogues. As with Robinson, Avery was acquitted.

            Trial of Rev. Mr. Avery: A Full Report of the Trial of Ephraim K. Avery (Boston: 1833), link
            by Benjamin Franklin Hallett


            A Vindication of the Result of the Trial of Rev. Ephraim K. Avery (Boston: Russell, Odiorne and Co., 1834), link
            by Timothy Merritt


            The Terrible Hay-stack Murder: Life and Trial of the Rev. Ephraim K. Avery (Philadelphia: Barclay & Co., 1876), link
            by Ephraim K. Avery


            A forensic textbook has a section on the evidence in the Avery case.

            Elements of Medical Jurisprudence, Volume 2 (Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott 1863, 12th ed.), Pages 196-199
            by Theodric Romeyn Beck, John Brodhead Beck
            There once was a guy from Nantucket
            whos dick was so long he could suck it
            It was As long as this thread
            And as old as the dead
            I tried to read it but said Fuk it!

            (the only thing more stale than this stinker is rap music. Lol) id suggest starting a lechmere thread or something with a modicum of ....
            Last edited by Abby Normal; 02-04-2019, 06:31 AM.
            "Is all that we see or seem
            but a dream within a dream?"

            -Edgar Allan Poe


            "...the man and the peaked cap he is said to have worn
            quite tallies with the descriptions I got of him."

            -Frederick G. Abberline

            Comment

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