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Scientific data on sleep and Druitts cricket match data proves his innocence

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  • mpriestnall
    replied
    Originally posted by Ginger View Post

    That's an interesting idea. Sleepwalking, or in some kind of dissociative state?
    Either or an early example of mind control?

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott Nelson
    replied
    We cover somnambulism in the second part of Murder Most Foul in Ripperologist 154.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joshua Rogan
    replied
    Originally posted by Ginger View Post

    Consider the case of Robert Ledru, in 1887. He was a well-regarded French detective tasked with solving a bizarre, apparently motiveless murder. After considering the evidence at some length, he concluded that he must have done it himself, while sleepwalking. The police suspected that he'd had a nervous breakdown at first, but he was able to prove the case against himself beyond any doubt. He spent the rest of his life in protective custody with a policeman guarding his bedroom.

    Had any other detective been assigned the case, he might not have been caught, as he recognized certain personal signs that pointed to his own handiwork. It's an unusual case, but the possibility of a sleepwalker escaping after a murder does exist.
    Sounds like an urban myth to me...

    Leave a comment:


  • Ginger
    replied
    Originally posted by c.d. View Post

    But then how would you explain his aptitude for escaping?

    c.d.
    Consider the case of Robert Ledru, in 1887. He was a well-regarded French detective tasked with solving a bizarre, apparently motiveless murder. After considering the evidence at some length, he concluded that he must have done it himself, while sleepwalking. The police suspected that he'd had a nervous breakdown at first, but he was able to prove the case against himself beyond any doubt. He spent the rest of his life in protective custody with a policeman guarding his bedroom.

    Had any other detective been assigned the case, he might not have been caught, as he recognized certain personal signs that pointed to his own handiwork. It's an unusual case, but the possibility of a sleepwalker escaping after a murder does exist.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by c.d. View Post

    But then how would you explain his aptitude for escaping?
    What are dreams, if not escapism?

    Leave a comment:


  • c.d.
    replied
    Originally posted by Ginger View Post

    That's an interesting idea. Sleepwalking, or in some kind of dissociative state?
    But then how would you explain his aptitude for escaping?

    c.d.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ginger
    replied
    Originally posted by mpriestnall View Post
    It's been known for people to leave their house and drive their car etc. Even to kill people.

    Maybe he commited these murders while sleepwalking?
    That's an interesting idea. Sleepwalking, or in some kind of dissociative state?

    Leave a comment:


  • Herlock Sholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post

    ... or trying to milk a penalty.
    Thatís a sore point at the moment for my brother who is a WBA fan Sam. They lost the first leg of the play-offs to local rivals Aston Villa today. Heís insistent that Villa got a penalty from a dive and that WBA were denied a genuine one. Then, to rub it in, their best goal scorer got sent off and will miss the second leg.

    The worst part is that he works in Birmingham as the only WBA fan amongst a horde of Villa and Blues fans. To say that heís not looking forward to Monday morning is an understatement.

    Leave a comment:


  • mpriestnall
    replied
    It's been known for people to leave their house and drive their car etc. Even to kill people.

    Maybe he commited these murders while sleepwalking?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by c.d. View Post

    If you see a soccer player rolling on the ground in great pain and holding his knee he probably tore his ACL.
    ... or trying to milk a penalty.

    Leave a comment:


  • Herlock Sholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by c.d. View Post
    I should have added that an ACL tear takes about a year of extensive therapy to recover from and some athletes are never really the same after an ACL tear.

    c.d.
    Iíll never be the same after discussing the case with certain posters on the Druitt thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • Herlock Sholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by c.d. View Post

    ACL stands for Anterior Cruciate Ligament. It is the main ligament in your knee. If you see a soccer player rolling on the ground in great pain and holding his knee he probably tore his ACL.

    c.d.
    Or more likely heís just play acting.

    Thanks for the info c.d.

    Leave a comment:


  • c.d.
    replied
    I should have added that an ACL tear takes about a year of extensive therapy to recover from and some athletes are never really the same after an ACL tear.

    c.d.

    Leave a comment:


  • c.d.
    replied
    Originally posted by Herlock Sholmes View Post

    And

    Bert Trautmann finished the 1956 FA Cup with a broken neck!

    Tiger Woods won the 2008 US Open on a broken leg and a torn ACL (whatever one of those is?)
    ACL stands for Anterior Cruciate Ligament. It is the main ligament in your knee. If you see a soccer player rolling on the ground in great pain and holding his knee he probably tore his ACL.

    c.d.

    Leave a comment:


  • Herlock Sholmes
    replied
    Originally posted by Ginger View Post
    Besides which, the Ripper was known to be a scoundrel. Just the sort who'd risk letting his team-mates down by playing without sleep!
    He was certainly a bad egg Ginger.

    Leave a comment:

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