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  • International Working Men's Educational Club - Jack the Ripper Wiki
    My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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    • Originally posted by Mark J D View Post



      Click image for larger version

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      i think that has been photoshopped ( IWMES )
      I listened to a podcast called the "House of Mystery" which had an interview with Tom Wescott. In it he claimed that the police officers who wrote down the word "Juwes" were possibly mistaken and that it could have been "Iwmes" standing for International Working Men's Educational Society. Tom

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      • A good little page !
        You can unscramble IWMES (EIMSW) into 25 words. Click to learn more about the unscrambled words in these 5 scrambled letters IWMES.

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        • mention in previous thread the word
          "Iw'ses "
          is this a medical term ?
          Last edited by milchmanuk; 08-14-2022, 06:25 AM.

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          • i don't believe it is
            IWMES
            i believe this as the Police wrote what they saw on the graffiti on the wall above the piece of apron,
            they all wrote the police officers a J. to start with in there log books.
            a clear line above the first letter.
            not what we interpret in our imaginations .
            it is a riddle of a killer .

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            • the posts are good yarns that lead to other questions and different perspectives.
              and shows the inquisitiveness of us all intrigued.

              Casebook: Jack the Ripper - Message Boards: Archive through June 20, 2005

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              • my first post i wrote was a nod to perhaps the area bein cleared of undesirables' foe for a religiously motivated communions.
                intended to scare these unfortunates away .as it would spoil Yiddish practice, as we know at certain times they like to Corden or tie string around a communities boundaries'
                a religious exercise.

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                • Originally posted by spyglass View Post

                  HI,
                  I mentioned those possibilities some years back, I like to think I was the first but probably wasnt.
                  I have also wondered if "Jewes / Juwes " was a name, as in notorious family or gang possibly spelt incorrectly .
                  Someone posted this s few years back, apparently it was in East Londin somewhere.
                  also the word JUWES underlined , attention / perhaps would of been pronounced more like "joo's but the graffitist wrote it this way. With it underlined

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                  • again there was no photograph !
                    was this intentionally done to see if there would be correspondences from the killer, trying to keep a lid on it as such so the police could then work leads if the killer was actually corresponding to the police.

                    oops this morning perhaps i should of wrote the diary

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                    • Prolly could have limited your coffee intake
                      My name is Dave. You cannot reach me through Debs email account

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                      • If the graffito and apron piece were not missed the first time around, then the killer lingered in the area for up to an hour before writing it. The killer's movements suggest he headed back into the heart of Ripperland rather than seek safety elsewhere. After the killer's bloodlust was sated, and his survival instincts kicked in, why would he go out to Goulston Street to write the graffito and drop the apron at the risk of getting caught? If this is true, he clearly wanted his message to be known. And what message was it? A vague anti-semitic comment or a vague message of Jewish solidarity? Depending on your interpretation.

                        "The graffito was bad enough for the police to censor it" That's debatable. It could be argued they were being overcautious, particularly as the GSG came out in the wash anyway and caused nary a whimper.

                        The other argument would be "he's a crazed serial killer, it made sense to him" This is a little more convincing. While messages left by killers are rare, some are more cryptic than others. However, the majority of them speak to the killer's murders and motivations. The GSG offers no insight into either.

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                        • Originally posted by Harry D View Post
                          If the graffito and apron piece were not missed the first time around, then the killer lingered in the area for up to an hour before writing it. The killer's movements suggest he headed back into the heart of Ripperland rather than seek safety elsewhere. After the killer's bloodlust was sated, and his survival instincts kicked in, why would he go out to Goulston Street to write the graffito and drop the apron at the risk of getting caught? If this is true, he clearly wanted his message to be known. And what message was it? A vague anti-semitic comment or a vague message of Jewish solidarity? Depending on your interpretation.

                          "The graffito was bad enough for the police to censor it" That's debatable. It could be argued they were being overcautious, particularly as the GSG came out in the wash anyway and caused nary a whimper.

                          The other argument would be "he's a crazed serial killer, it made sense to him" This is a little more convincing. While messages left by killers are rare, some are more cryptic than others. However, the majority of them speak to the killer's murders and motivations. The GSG offers no insight into either.
                          Harry,

                          in the event the murderer was intent on leaving garbled messages on a wall for whatever reason he thought it expedient, then it would have happened at other murder sites, particularly Mark Kelly's lodging when there was ample opportunity.

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                          • Originally posted by DJA View Post

                            Reckon Mr Blotchy drugged Kelly and left the door unlocked for Sutton.
                            The first part of that is certainly a possibility- especially if by "drugged", you mean "got (her) drunk as a skunk". (Or whatever term the Brits use- I don't recall if skunks are native to the British Isles.)

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                            • Originally posted by Parisi North Humber View Post
                              Hi Trever, so are your saying that Catherine wasn't wearing her apron but was carrying a single bisected apron in her possesions that JTR took from her belongings used and then dumped?

                              Helen x
                              Now, that is a possibility- even likely. I used to have a shirt that I really liked and long after it was past the point of being usable as a shirt, I kept the pieces and used them as handkerchiefs.

                              Nowadays, people that aren't poor have no concept of the term "reuse". And these people were the poster images for "poorer than 'dirt'" (thus "dirt poor").
                              Last edited by C. F. Leon; 08-15-2022, 08:52 PM.

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                              • Originally posted by DJA View Post
                                City-constable Lewis Robinson, 931, deposed: At half-past eight, on the night of Saturday, Sept. 29, while on duty in High-street, Aldgate, I saw a crowd of persons outside No. 29, surrounding a woman whom I have since recognised as the deceased.
                                The Coroner: What state was she in? - Drunk. Lying on the footway? - Yes. I asked the crowd if any of them knew her or where she lived, but got no answer. I then picked her up and sat her against the shutters, but she fell down sideways. With the aid of a fellow-constable I took her to Bishopsgate Police-station. There she was asked her name, and she replied "Nothing." She was then put into a cell.
                                Realize that what we are seeing is the writing of a court reporter- 2nd-hand at best, and if the newspaper's reporter, more likely 3rd or 4th.

                                - "There she was asked her name, and she replied 'Nothing.'" (Meaning that her response was to literally say "Nothing".)
                                - "There she was asked her name, and she replied Nothing." (Meaning that she didn't say anything to the question.)

                                Two different interpretations, either of which could be correct, by Someone who probably wasn't actually there at the time- which one is true?

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