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  • Rob Clack
    started a topic Sergeant Stephen White

    Sergeant Stephen White

    Biographical details and Photos:

    Stephen White c1900 (copyright Delia Lorensen)
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    Stephen White from 'The Peoples Journal' 27 September 1919
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    Son Percy (copyright Delia Lorensen)
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    Daughter Edith (copyright Delia Lorensen)
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    1854 Born 25th May in Oare, Favisham district, Kent.
    Son of George White, Labourer and Hannah White (Born Kennett also married previously to somebody named “Sparks”).

    1861 Living in Standard Square (presumably No. 5), Faversham, Kent with parents, brother George age 10 (this is possibly George Sparks), Alfred age 5 and sister Esther age 1.

    1871 Living at 5 Standard Square with parents, sister Esther age 11 and brother Alfred age 8.

    1875 23rd April married Olive Fletcher, Living at 5 Standard Square, Faversham, Kent.

    11th October, Joined Police, Warrant no.59442. Stationed at L Division, Kennington, Lambeth.

    1878 7th February, Daughter Edith was born, living at 28 Henry Street, Upper Kennington Lane, Lambeth.

    1881 Living at 28 Gilbert Road, Lambeth, Surrey, England. Living with wife Olive White, Daughter Edith White and Lodger James Taylor who was 43 and occupation was Time Keeper.

    26th July, promoted to Police Sergeant, Third Class.

    4th August, Transferred to H (Whitechapel) Division,

    1882 17th February, Son Percy was born, living at 77 Rutland Street, Mile End.

    1886 4th November, promoted Police Sergeant, Second Class.

    1888 Part of the detectives that investigated the Whitechapel murders.

    30th September, sent by Inspector Abberline, and in the company of P. C. Dolden, made house-to-house inquires in Berner Street, Interviewed Matthew Packer.

    4th October, re-interviewed Matthew Packer.



    ST JAMES GAZZETE
    19th NOVEMBER 1888

    THE EAST-END MURDERS.

    On Saturday afternoon the Birmingham detectives informed the police at Scotland-yard that a man suspected of being concerned in the Whitechapel murders had left that town by train for London. Detectives Leach and White, of the Criminal Investigation Department, proceeded to Willesden junction and Euston respectively, and at the latter station Inspector White detained the person in question, and conveyed him to Scotland-yard. It was stated that he had been staying at a common lodging-house in Birmingham since Monday last. The suspected person was a medical man who was some years ago practising in London, He was of gentlemanly appearance and manners and somewhat resembled the description given by witnesses at the late inquest. After being closely questioned as to his whereabouts at the time of the murders, and supplying a satisfactory account of himself, he was liberated.

    1891 Living at 55 Bromehead Street, Mile End. Living with wife Olive, son Percy and daughter Edith.

    1891 26th December, transferred to S (Hampstead) Division. Police Sergeant, First Class.

    1893 24th April, transferred back to H Division.

    1895 9th December, Promoted to Local Inspector. H Division.

    1896 17th December, Daughter Edith married Alfred Clark.

    1900 12th October, retired.

    Pension details:

    Age on Resignation: 46 years

    Length of Service: 25 years 4 days.

    Remuneration at date of retirement: £3 and 19 shillings per week.

    Height: 5ft 10 1/2 inches

    Hair: Grey

    Eyes: Brown

    Complexion: Fresh

    Particular Mark, Defect or Infirmity by which he may be identified: Nil.


    EAST LONDON OBSERVER
    16 October 1900

    Inspector White Retires.
    East End Police Memories

    In Inspector Stephen White, of the Criminal Investigation Department, who retired from the service on Saturday, London loses one of the smartest detectives the force has ever known. Mr. White joined the police 26 years ago, and was first stationed in the L division at Kennington. His abilities were soon recognised, and he became a member of the old detective force. When Mr. (now Sir) Howard Vincent took office as the head of the Criminal Investigation Department, Mr White was promoted to sergeant, and in 1880 was transferred to Leman-street, Whitechapel, the head quarters of the H division, where he passed through all the grades until he became the chief of the local staff, and now retires on a full pension, and with the respect and best wishes of all his fellow officers. Among a few of the important captures made by Mr. White were those of the dynamitards, Cunningham and Burton, at the Tower of London, at the time of the explosion there, for which services he was rewarded and commended by the Home Office. In 1879 he discovered a Fenian Arsenal in the New Cut, Lambeth, and captured the proprietor, who received a long term of penal servitude. He has had, perhaps, a greater experience of murders than any other officer in the department, being engaged in the whole of the "Jack the Ripper" crimes in the East End. He was also connected with the notorious cases of Harry Alt, who murdered a German baker in Turner-street; Sullivan, the St. George's murderer; Cronin, the Limehouse assassin; Ronin, who committed murder in Angel-court, Whitechapel; Seaman, who killed an aged Jew and his housekeeper in Turner-street; Karaczewski the Pole, who shot a man and woman dead in Brick-lane; Kate Marshall, who killed her sister in Dorset-street, in the very same house where the last Ripper murder was committed. Keepers of private stills, which at one time were very common in the district, had good reason to fear Mr. White, his record of the last year alone being 16 prosecutions. A clever musician, a witty and fluent speaker, he has contributed as an entertainer to the enjoyment of many thousands in all parts of the country, and many a thief who considered himself an expert in palming has had reason to regret that Mr. White was a professor in the art of legerdemain.



    1900 26th December, Son Percy (Percy was listed as a Policeman) married Caroline Annie Brown, daughter of William Brown, a retired Police Constable.

    1901 Living at 39 Senrad Street, Mile End. Living with wife Olive. There was a visitor Isaac Alfred Hopping (who was related to Olive White) aged 19, born in Kent. Occupation was Butler staying at the time of the 1901 census.
    Daughter Edith was staying at the above address also with husband Alfred and two children, Mina 4 and Stanley 2.

    Percy was living at 47 Arbour Square, Mile End. Occupation was Railway Detective.


    THE POLICE CHRONICLE AND GUARDIAN
    25 May 1901

    WHITECHAPEL

    At Shoreditch, ex-Insp. Stephen White, of the Criminal Investigation Department, H Division Metropolitan Police was presented with a purse containing 100 guineas, subscribed by the local members of Parliament, tradesmen and friends, on his retirement from the Force after upwards of 25 years’ service. It was incidentally mentioned during the proceedings that Mr. White had recently been the recipient of a handsome gold watch from his colleagues at Scotland Yard, and a gold-mounted walking-stick from the officers who served under him whilst in the Force


    1919 17th September, died. Cause of death was Carcinoma of Prostate, for which he was operated on at the London Hospital 19(missing). He died at home which was still 39 Senrad Street. His son Percy was listed as informant, he was living at 220 Risley Avenue, Tottenham. Death was certified by Dr H Richardson M.R.C.S. there was no post-mortem.



    EAST LONDON ADVERTISER
    27 September 1919
    DEATH OF FAMOUS EAST-END DETECTIVE.
    OFFICER WHO JUST MISSED CATCHING THE MYSTERIOUS “JACK THE RIPPER.”

    One of the smartest detectives the Metropolitan Police Force ever knew has passed away in exDetective-Inspector White who retired from the C.I.D. in 1900 after completing 27 years' service. After a few years he was promoted to a sergeant and was transferred from Kennington to Leman Street, Whitechapel.
    There he made several important captures, among them being the arrest of the dynamitards, Cunningham and Burton, at the Tower of London at the time of the explosion there, for which service he was rewarded and commended by the Home Office.
    In 1879 he discovered a Fenian arsenal in the New Cut, Lambeth, and captured the proprietor, who was sentenced to a long term of penal servitude.
    His experience of murders, was perhaps unique. He was engaged on the whole of the Jack the Ripper crimes which caused such a grim sensation among East Enders. One night he was on what appeared to be a certain clue to the mysterious murderer of women in the Whitechapel region. He kept watch in an East End street, but the murderer's movements were not in accordance with anticipation. For about ten minutes only he left the street, and to his amazement he found on his return that a woman had been stabbed. He saw no man anywhere, and the mystery became even more baffling. As is well known, Jack the Ripper was never discovered.
    Mr. White was also associated with the notorious case of Harry Alt, who murdered a German baker in Turner Street; Sullivan the St. George in the East murderer; Cronin the Limehouse assassin; Roman, who committed murder in Angel Court, Whitechapel; Seaman, who killed an aged Jew and his housekeeper in Turner Street; Karacrewski, the pole, who shot a man and woman dead in Brick Lane; and Kate Marshall, who killed her sister in Dorset Street, in the very house where the last Ripper murder was committed.
    It is interesting to note that a son of his is a detective at the G. P. O. The funeral took place on Tuesday.

  • Richard Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert View Post
    Yes Richard, he was there during the daytime. I thought you meant that he could be pinpointed as working there around the time of the murder.
    I see what you mean Robert. Sorry for such a long explanation, since we were both on the same page on this. I have nothing to pinpoint him to a location at the time of any of the murders.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert
    replied
    Yes Richard, he was there during the daytime. I thought you meant that he could be pinpointed as working there around the time of the murder.

    Leave a comment:


  • Richard Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert View Post
    Hi Richard

    How can you date this event to September 30th, and why do you say that White was on Berner St? On the other thread you express doubts.
    Hi Robert,

    I say White was on Berner Street on September 30, because that is what Ripper Casebook, which you support, tells us.

    http://wiki.casebook.org/index.php/Stephen_White

    If White was indeed on Berner Street on the day of the double murder, it is probable that his encounter occurred at the location of one of the double murders for that day. This would be either near the gateway to Dutfield’s Yard in Berner Street, or an entrance to Mitre Square. I believe it to be a far more believable premise than Castle Alley. Although I am confident that he was at Berner Street, Sept 30th, I have doubts as to where he was during the time of either of the double murders. Or where he was for any of the murders. Regardless of which murder, or day, it seems as if White met an actual East End inhabitant, Francis Thompson.

    Respectfully,

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris
    replied
    Originally posted by Paddy View Post
    The Truth about the Whitechapel Mysteries told by Harry Cox
    Ex-Detective Inspector, London City Police. Specially written for "Thomson's Weekly News" 1906


    There were several other officers with me, and I think there can be no harm in stating that the opinion of most of them was that the man they were watching had something to do with the crimes. You can imagine that never once did we allow him to quit our sight. The least slip and another brutal crime might have been perpetrated under our very noses. It was not easy to forget that already one of them had taken place at the very moment when one of our smartest colleagues was passing the top of the dimly lit street.

    I wonder if Henry Cox was talking about White in this last sentence here?
    Yes, I think it's very likely. White is described in very similar terms in newspaper articles quoted on the first page of this thread - "One of the smartest detectives the force has ever known."

    Leave a comment:


  • Paddy
    replied
    The Truth about the Whitechapel Mysteries told by Harry Cox
    Ex-Detective Inspector, London City Police. Specially written for "Thomson's Weekly News" 1906


    There were several other officers with me, and I think there can be no harm in stating that the opinion of most of them was that the man they were watching had something to do with the crimes. You can imagine that never once did we allow him to quit our sight. The least slip and another brutal crime might have been perpetrated under our very noses. It was not easy to forget that already one of them had taken place at the very moment when one of our smartest colleagues was passing the top of the dimly lit street.

    I wonder if Henry Cox was talking about White in this last sentence here?

    Pat................

    Leave a comment:


  • Bridewell
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. John Watson View Post
    As noted in the other thread, Sgt. White was almost certainly describing the scene of Alice McKenzie's slaying, Castle Alley.

    John
    I've always thought Castle Alley the best fit (of a bad selection) for White's claim of a sighting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. John Watson
    replied
    As noted in the other thread, Sgt. White was almost certainly describing the scene of Alice McKenzie's slaying, Castle Alley.

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert
    replied
    Hi Richard

    How can you date this event to September 30th, and why do you say that White was on Berner St? On the other thread you express doubts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Richard Patterson
    replied
    Did White see Casebook's 12th most popular Ripper suspect that night.

    People here might want to look at a thread I have started in Casebook Witnesses. It’s about identifying the man, thought to be the Ripper. Detective Sergeant Stephen White supposedly encountered this man October 30th 1888. This senior police officer, under direct orders from Sir Robert Anderson, who was in charge of the Whitechapel investigation, was making enquires door to door, on the day of a double event. He was on Berner Street, where a victim was found. The man White encountered moments after and very near, a ripper murder, matches the homeless East End poet who walked the streets at night. Francis Thompson, a man who happens to be Casebook’s 12th most popular suspect. The thread I’ve posted in Casebook’s Witnesses forum asks did a police officer see Thompson leaving a murder scene right after the 2nd of the double murders. You are welcome to take a look at a thread I’ve posted on Casebook in the Witnesses section.

    http://forum.casebook.org/showthread.php?t=8564

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Guy
    replied
    Originally posted by The Good Michael View Post
    Person or persons unknown = unknown person. You can't read what you want into this. It just isn't there. Sorry.

    Exactly Mike.
    In fact, the Coroner basically said the medical evidence showed it to be the work of one man only, and directed the jury to go for the person unknown option.


    He [Coroner] presumed that the jury would return a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown, and then the police could freely pursue their inquiries and follow up any clue they might obtain. A magnificent reward had been offered, and that might be the means of setting people on the track and bringing to speedy justice the creature who had committed this atrocious crime.
    On reflection, perhaps it would be sufficient to return a verdict of wilful murder against some person unknown, inasmuch as the medical evidence conclusively demonstrated that only one person could be implicated. The jury at once returned a verdict accordingly


    Daily Tel Oct 12th:

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  • The Good Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael W Richards View Post
    The potential for a second or even a third individual involved with one or more of the murders is there, there is no evidence that Im aware of that would discount it as a possibility. Only Kates Inquest ended with a conclusion she was killed by an individual. Of course they could just be men working in collusion to commit murder, and not serial killers.
    How many of the 5 murders were committed in the City of London? Different coroner there; different wording; same meaning. There is nothing in that statement. Person or persons unknown = unknown person. You can't read what you want into this. It just isn't there. Sorry.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael W Richards
    replied
    The potential for a second or even a third individual involved with one or more of the murders is there, there is no evidence that Im aware of that would discount it as a possibility. Only Kates Inquest ended with a conclusion she was killed by an individual. Of course they could just be men working in collusion to commit murder, and not serial killers.

    Cheers

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert
    replied
    Hi Penhalion

    I was wondering if the beat PC might take it into his head to peer through the window, but you're right, the idea of an accomplice is a non-starter, as far as I'm concerned.

    Leave a comment:


  • Penhalion
    replied
    The Miller's Court scenario is the one JtR murder which wouldn't need an accomplice for safety. The beat cop is hardly likely to start randomly knocking on doors just in case Saucy Jack is up to something behind a door in a dark, quiet courtyard.

    A female accomplice has a better chance of making the average Victorian Whitechapel sex worker suspicious than of lulling her into feeling safe. By the very nature of their trade, they expect lone men to approach them and to then go off into dark secluded places with them. Having a woman solicit them would probably seem bizarre and suspicious. The time a female accomplice is useful is in luring otherwise cautious victims into a dangerous situation. The victims of JtR were not cautious, they were desperate.

    Leave a comment:

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