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Monro in the Indian Civil Service

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  • Monro in the Indian Civil Service

    Hi All,

    James Monro's career in the Indian Civil Service, 1857 - 1884

    Arrived India, 27th Jan. 1857
    Commenced service 16th Sep. 1857
    Officiating under-Secretary to the Government of Bengal, [pre-27th Nov. 1861]
    I.C.S. Examinations — Top in German [291/375], 2nd in Sanskrit [295/375] 1862
    Furlough — from [?] to 8th Apr. 1863
    Joint Magistrate, Sarun, May 1865
    Officiating Magistrate of Jessore, 22nd July 1865
    Joint Magistrate, Jessore, Officiating as Magistrate of Jessore, 29th Jan. 1866
    Deputy. Commissioner of Customs, Calcutta, Officiating as Magistrate of Jessore, 11th Dec. 1867
    Officiating Jr. Secretary, Board of Revenue, 4th Aug. 1868
    Officiating Secretary, to the Board of Revenue, 10th Oct. 1868
    Officiating Jr. Secretary, Board of Revenue, 6th Nov. 1868
    Officiating Magistrate of Nuddea, 8th Jan. 1869
    Officiating Magistrate, 1st grade, 18th Jan. 1869
    Officiating Magistrate, 2nd grade, 1st Jan. 1870
    Furlough — from 2nd Mar, 1870 to 24th Dec. 1871
    Officiating Magistrate, 1st grade, Jessore, 9th Jan. 1872
    Magistrate, 2nd grade, Officiating as Magistrate, 1st grade, 1st Feb. 1872
    Officiating Magistrate, Howrah, 3rd Oct 1872
    Officiating Deputy. Collector of Customs, Calcutta, 10th Dec. 1872
    Magistrate, Rangpur, Officiating as Deputy Collector of Customs, 15th Apr. 1873
    Officiating Judge, Rajshahi, 1st Oct 1873
    Magistrate, 2nd grade, Acting as Judge, Rajshahi, 2nd Apr. 1874
    Judge, 2nd grade, Rajshahi, 30th Mar. 1874
    Sick Leave — from 15th Jan. 1876 to 2nd Nov. 1876 [horse-riding incident]
    Judge of Rajshahi, 22nd Nov. 1876
    Judge of Nadina, 15th Mar. 1877
    Officiating Inspector General of Police, 10th Apr. 1877
    Judge, Jessore, Officiating as Inspector General of Police, 10th Apr. 1877
    Inspector General of Police, Bengal, 1st Jan. 1878 to 1st Jun. 1882
    Commissioner, Presidency Division, 14th June 1882
    Furlough — from [?] 1883 to July 1884
    Assistant Commissioner, Metropolitan Police, 7th July 1884

    Regards,

    Simon

  • #2
    Hello Simon,

    This makes fascinating reading. Thank you indeed for posting.


    best wishes

    Phil
    Chelsea FC. TRUE BLUE. 💙


    Justice for the 96 = achieved
    Accountability? ....

    Comment


    • #3
      Hello Simon,

      A thought.

      On another thread, the mention of Monro not following the political line came up. I notice his past as both magistrate and judge on this thread.

      Could it be that his "neutral" stance, like a judge, was the cause of the problem re the Cleveland Street scandal?

      Just a thought.

      best wishes

      Phil
      Chelsea FC. TRUE BLUE. 💙


      Justice for the 96 = achieved
      Accountability? ....

      Comment


      • #4
        The Black Cobra Sahib

        Hi Phil,

        In a letter to Melville Macnaghten, James Monro wrote, "My principle throughout has ever been that in policing, politics have no place — and this principle I followed during the whole time I was at Scotland Yard, under four different Secretaries of State . . ."

        In "Indian and Home Memories", Sir Henry Cotton K.C.S.I. wrote—

        "When I served under him [James Monro] he was in his prime, a terror to evildoers, a sleuth-hound in the detection of crime, fearing nothing, daring all things, deliberately straining every section of law and procedure, and falling many times under the correction of the High Court for irregularities and even worse transgressions. He was known among a certain class as the keate, or black cobra Sahib, and was the ideal of what is called in official language a strong Magistrate. He was my official superior. I was then very young, only twenty-four years of age, and I confess that I admired him greatly and was completely carried away by the glamour of his achievements."

        I shall leave you to draw any conclusions from the foregoing.

        Regards,

        Simon
        Last edited by Simon Wood; 10-22-2012, 03:38 PM. Reason: spolling mistook

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Simon Wood View Post
          Hi Phil,

          In a letter to Melville Macnaghten, James Monro wrote, "My principle throughout has ever been that in policing, politics have no place — and this principle I followed during the whole time I was at Scotland Yard, under four different Secretaries of State . . ."

          In "Indian and Home Memories", Sir Henry Cotton K.C.S.I. wrote—

          "When I served under him [James Monro] he was in his prime, a terror to evildoers, a sleuth-hound in the detection of crime, fearing nothing, daring all things, deliberately straining every section of law and procedure, and falling many times under the correction of the High Court for irregularities and even worse transgressions. He was known among a certain class as the keate, or black cobra Sahib, and was the ideal of what is called in official language a strong Magistrate. He was my official superior. I was then very young, only twenty-four years of age, and I confess that I admired him greatly and was completely carried away by the glamour of his achievements."

          I shall leave you to draw any conclusions from the foregoing.

          Regards,

          Simon
          Hello Simon,

          Without drawing conclusions, nor indeed tight comparisons, the straining of the law of how a pooliceman operates reminds me of a certain Sir Robert Anderson, and his coments such related. That both Anderson and Monro were of the same religious ilk is also of interest.

          Thank you once again for your reply.

          best wishes

          Phil
          Chelsea FC. TRUE BLUE. 💙


          Justice for the 96 = achieved
          Accountability? ....

          Comment

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