Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Victimology, MO, signature

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pierre
    started a topic Victimology, MO, signature

    Victimology, MO, signature

    Shall we try to make our short definition of the three?

    My suggestion:

    Victimology:

    Poor women often addicted to alcohol selling their bodies cheaply and/or vagabonding in Whitechapel or the City

    MO (modus operandi):

    Execution in places with a high risk of fast discovery

    Signature:

    Honour based mutilations and posing

    Regards Pierre

  • DJA
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    And what about Barts, UCH, St Thomas's and the Middlesex? What if Guy's had beds available, for that matter?
    We're just interested in accuracy.
    Tautology.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by DJA View Post
    Guy's had a history of overcrowded women's wards
    And what about Barts, UCH, St Thomas's and the Middlesex? What if Guy's had beds available, for that matter?
    You and Sam simply enjoy splitting hairs.
    We're just interested in accuracy.

    Leave a comment:


  • DJA
    replied
    Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
    Why do you use the word accepted, rather than admitted?

    Do you imagine a bedridden Polly Nichols running a dangerously high temperature was rejected by her nearest hospital (Guys), which was also involved in the the rheumatic fever research, and told to cross the river to see if the London Hospital had a spare bed?
    Because she was accepted into the study when she was admitted.
    Guy's had a history of overcrowded women's wards.
    Check it out!

    She had been ill for 12 days,bedridden for 8.Perhaps the closest hospital could/would not admit her.I don't know.
    Lot worse happens here in Melbourne in 2018.
    One of the reasons I spent years fundraising for St Vincent's Hospital in Melbourne.
    Also used to help out at Ozanam House.
    Some of my alcohol and drug work was setting up the prototype for the decentralisation of services in Victoria.It was known as WDAS,Westernport Drug and Alcohol Services.That prototype has spread and been duplicated successfully.
    I spent time at the coalface in modern times.

    You and Sam simply enjoy splitting hairs.
    Last edited by DJA; 12-07-2018, 02:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrBarnett
    replied
    Originally posted by DJA View Post
    Indeed.

    Two of them were involved in the study.

    These two patients were accepted at the London Hospital.

    Life is like that.
    Why do you use the word accepted, rather than admitted?

    Do you imagine a bedridden Polly Nichols running a dangerously high temperature was rejected by her nearest hospital (Guys), which was also involved in the the rheumatic fever research, and told to cross the river to see if the London Hospital had a spare bed?
    Last edited by MrBarnett; 12-07-2018, 01:41 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • DJA
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    Indeed, but Central London had - and still has - many, many hospitals. Guy's, Bart's, St Thomas's, Middlesex and UCH were all big hospitals which were closer to where Nichols and Eddowes were living in 1867.
    Indeed.

    Two of them were involved in the study.

    These two patients were accepted at the London Hospital.

    Life is like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by DJA View Post
    They would have been admitted where there was room for them,preferably with some relative peace and quiet.
    Indeed, but Central London had - and still has - many, many hospitals. Guy's, Bart's, St Thomas's, Middlesex and UCH were all big hospitals which were closer to where Nichols and Eddowes were living in 1867.

    Leave a comment:


  • DJA
    replied
    Who was the author?

    Leave a comment:


  • Batman
    replied
    Originally posted by DJA View Post
    You have a very fertile mind.

    OK,so which of the CV5?
    Eddowes

    Behind this, the liver was stabbed as if by the point of a sharp instrument. Below this was another incision into the liver of about two and a half inches, and below this the left lobe of the liver was slit through by a vertical cut.

    There was a cut from the upper part of the slit on the under surface of the liver to the left side, and another cut at right angles to this, which were about an inch and a half deep and two and a half inches long. Liver itself was healthy.

    The pancreas was cut, but not through, on the left side of the spinal column.

    Three and a half inches of the lower border of the spleen by half an inch was attached only to the peritoneum.

    None of that has medical value.

    Leave a comment:


  • DJA
    replied
    Originally posted by Batman View Post
    You do realize that many of JtR's victims had their internal organs slashed, including kidney piercing, which, has no known medical value at all.
    You have a very fertile mind.

    OK,so which of the CV5?

    Leave a comment:


  • Batman
    replied
    Originally posted by DJA View Post

    Excerpt from Wikipedia .....

    Gull and Sutton point out that Dr. Bright and others have fully recognised that the granular contracted kidney is usually associated with morbid changes in other organs of the body and that these co-existent changes were commonly grouped together and termed "chronic Bright's disease." The prevailing opinion at the time was that the kidney was the organ primarily affected, inducing a condition that would spread to other parts of the body and thereby cause other organs to suffer.
    You do realize that many of JtR's victims had their internal organs slashed, including kidney piercing, which, has no known medical value at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • DJA
    replied
    Originally posted by Sam Flynn View Post
    In this instance, though, isn't it a case of two women who lived elsewhere in London being treated in an East End hospital?

    I'm basing that on Gary's helpful info about Eddowes living in Westminster in 1867. Thanks, Gary... and Debs.
    They would have been admitted where there was room for them,preferably with some relative peace and quiet.

    Still happens today in Melbourne,Sydney and Brisbane.
    Lost my sister-in-law in September 2012 in Sydney and my brother on 28 June this year in Brisbane.
    Both had to travel from one side of town to the other.

    A significant part of my early research centered on Guy's Hospital.

    Leave a comment:


  • DJA
    replied
    Originally posted by Kattrup View Post
    Yes, there’s no real reason to assume that MAN or Cath C are Nichols and Eddowes, nor to assume there’s any significance to it if they are - but of course it would interesting to know

    Doesn’t seem very likely, though, the ages are off and the names very common.
    Sutton had a recurring problem with maths.
    It is why most people have his age wrong.

    Both women had a strep infection that resides in the intestines,which is known to travel to the kidneys.

    Odd that two similar women resided next to each other before their murders.

    Excerpt from Wikipedia .....

    Gull and Sutton point out that Dr. Bright and others have fully recognised that the granular contracted kidney is usually associated with morbid changes in other organs of the body and that these co-existent changes were commonly grouped together and termed "chronic Bright's disease." The prevailing opinion at the time was that the kidney was the organ primarily affected, inducing a condition that would spread to other parts of the body and thereby cause other organs to suffer.

    Gull and Sutton argued that this assumption was incorrect. They presented evidence to show that the diseased state could also originate in other organs, and that the deterioration of the kidney is part of the general morbid change, rather than the primary cause. In some cases examined by Gull and Sutton, the kidney was only marginally affected while the condition was far more advanced in other organs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sam Flynn
    replied
    Originally posted by DJA View Post
    My father died of rheumatic fever complications in Melbourne,1962.
    He was not hospitalised at the nearest major hospital.
    He went in where there was room.
    In this instance, though, isn't it a case of two women who lived elsewhere in London being treated in an East End hospital?

    I'm basing that on Gary's helpful info about Eddowes living in Westminster in 1867. Thanks, Gary... and Debs.

    Leave a comment:


  • DJA
    replied
    Originally posted by MrBarnett View Post
    Of course, at the time the patient MAN was admitted to the London Hospital (Whitechapel) Polly had relocated south of the river, where she stayed for most of the remainder of her life. Wouldn't she have been admitted into a south London Hospital, such as Guys, from there?

    And she would have been pregnant in December, 1867, but there's no mention of that in the notes.
    Can only comment on Melbourne,Sydney and Brisbane hospitals.
    Was a fund raiser for one of Melbourne's largest inner city hospitals.

    My father died of rheumatic fever complications in Melbourne,1962.
    He was not hospitalised at the nearest major hospital.
    He went in where there was room.

    I have had a related strep disease for 38 years which is supposed to be handled by our hospital system.
    And pigs fly.

    Polly was almost certainly pregnant and living in either Camberwell or Walworth,Southwark.
    Percy George was baptised on 9 August 1868.

    Why would MAN's pregnancy be listed in a study of Rheumatic Fever?

    Thanks for clearing up Sam's query for me

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X