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  • #16
    Originally posted by jerryd View Post

    Agreed. Gary is an exceptional researcher.
    As are you.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Debra A View Post

      As Jerry mentions, there was speculation that the man named Charatan at Albert Backert's Newnham Street address could have been the man known as 'General Charrington' but the mention of engraving seems to point to Backert for sure.
      Perhaps “Albert Charrington” was a sort of nom de guerre. The news reports from the early 1880’s show Albert Bachert was quite willing to get into physical fights. This propensity, along with an ability to attract the support of like-minded youths, may help explain how he became “General Charrington.”

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      • #18
        General Charrington’s influence wasn’t limited to the East End of London, but even he couldn’t master the English climate.

        The Yorkshire Herald, 31 March 1883, page 15

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Belloc View Post

          Perhaps “Albert Charrington” was a sort of nom de guerre. The news reports from the early 1880’s show Albert Bachert was quite willing to get into physical fights. This propensity, along with an ability to attract the support of like-minded youths, may help explain how he became “General Charrington.”
          Thanks Belloc.

          You could be right, there. However, the Skeleton Army was the antithesis of the Salvation Army. They had General Booth as their leader so isn't it fitting to have "General Charrington" as leader of the Skeleton Army. "General", packs more punch than, "Journeyman engraver".

          Thanks for posting all you have on Bachert. He's a favorite topic of mine.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by jerryd View Post

            Thanks Belloc.

            You could be right, there. However, the Skeleton Army was the antithesis of the Salvation Army. They had General Booth as their leader so isn't it fitting to have "General Charrington" as leader of the Skeleton Army. "General", packs more punch than, "Journeyman engraver".

            Thanks for posting all you have on Bachert. He's a favorite topic of mine.
            Bachert was the ultimate of Copy Cats in that respect.

            General Booth was not the most favourable figure and involved in child abduction ala Dr Barnardo.

            The Salvationist movement was ridiculed with hypocrisy and corruption.

            The adoption of the word "General" is clearly an attempt to mimic.

            Charles Le Grand also adopted military jargon by calling himself "The Colonel"
            And he was a rogue in every sense.

            The Skeleton Army appears to have been comprised of angry young men with a right wing agenda who opposed perceived faux Christians (Salvationists) socialists, liberals and foreigners...and yet held very little sway on public opinion.
            ​​​​​​

            The one thing that Bachert's use of the name "General Charrington" proves; is that he had the capacity and ability to mimic, fabricate, self promote and adapt himself and his life accordingly.
            When you incorporate this attribute into the world of the Ripper case; it amplifies the case for him having been the killer.


            RD
            "Great minds, don't think alike"

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            • #21
              Originally posted by The Rookie Detective View Post
              There was a man who was a British subject through foreign parentage, describing himself as a single Engraver of the same age boarding with a family in Wales in 1911

              His name was "Roland Joe"

              However, that was a false name as Roland Joe never appeared elsewhere.

              The name "Roland" in German means...

              "Famous across the land"


              Was this Albert Bachert?

              And was this his message to highlight that it was HE who was famous across the land?

              Was this a subtle message from the actual Ripper himself?

              ​​
              RD

              ​​​​​
              And of course, MJK was alleged to have been fond of another "Joe"

              Was this Bachert?


              RD
              "Great minds, don't think alike"

              Comment


              • #22

                This appeared in "Toby" on the 31st August 1889; the anniversary of the murder of Nichols...

                Click image for larger version

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                "Great minds, don't think alike"

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by The Rookie Detective View Post

                  And of course, MJK was alleged to have been fond of another "Joe"

                  Was this Bachert?


                  RD
                  Hi RD.

                  What is known of Roland Joe to make you think he is Albert Bachert, other than he is an engraver?




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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jerryd View Post

                    Hi RD.

                    What is known of Roland Joe to make you think he is Albert Bachert, other than he is an engraver?



                    Roland Joe is a Ghost.


                    There are no other records matching the data that appears on the 1911 census
                    ​​​​​​
                    If there's one thing that remained fairly constant; it was Bachert stating he was an Engraver.

                    The age is also the same based on Bachert's birth and baptism data.

                    The name Roland is as close to a German self proclamation of being famous across the land; and the name Joe may also correspond to MJK.

                    If anyone is able to find data that disproves that Roland Joe cannot be Bachert, then it is back to square one in terms of where he could have gone after 1901.

                    One thing that is certain is that whomever the man who lodged with the Irish family in Wales in 1911; his real name was certainly not Roland Joe.
                    And so why use an alias?


                    There's just something about that 1911 census that makes me feels it could be Bachert.

                    I have been trying to disprove my own hypothesis for the past few weeks, but so far I can't disprove it.


                    RD
                    ​​​​​
                    "Great minds, don't think alike"

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