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Go Back   Casebook Forums > Ripper Discussions > Suspects > General Suspect Discussion

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  #561  
Old 03-04-2017, 08:04 PM
TradeName TradeName is offline
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Default Elizabeth Wells Gallup Part IV

A pair of biographical works which draw upon "Mrs. Gallup's decipherings" and the claim that Francis Bacon was Queen Elizabeth's son.[


I]The Strange Case of Francis Tidir[/i] (London: Robert Banks, 1902), link
by Parker Woodward


The Early Life of Lord Bacon (London: Gay and Bird, 1902), link
By Parker Woodward


A collection of essays by the same author.

Tudor Problems (London: Bird and Hancock, 1912), link
by Parker Woodward



Some works put out by Riverbank Laboratories, including one targeting innocent children.


The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon (Geneva, Illinois: Riverbank Laboratories, 1916), link
By J. A. Powell


The Keys for Deciphering the Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon (Geneva, Illinois: Riverbank Laboratories, 1916), link


Hints to the Decipherer of The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon (Geneva, Illinois: Riverbank Laboratories, 1916), link


Ciphers for the Little Folks (Geneva, Illinois: Riverbank Laboratories, 1916), link, alternate link with better colors

I took a stab at deciphering the message in the castle picture on page 41, and almost got it. I found the solution in the first of William Friedman's lectures here (PDF).

Last edited by TradeName : 03-04-2017 at 08:27 PM.
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  #562  
Old 03-04-2017, 08:26 PM
TradeName TradeName is offline
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Default Booth and Reed

The Friedman book on the ciphers has a chapter about this guy.

Some Acrostic Signatures of Francis Bacon (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1909), link
by William Stone Booth


Some works by Edwin Reed, with editions of two plays with Baconian annotations.


Bacon Vs. Shakespeare: Brief for Plaintiff (Boston: Joseph Knight, 1897), link
By Edwin Reed



Francis Bacon Our Shake-speare (Boston: Charles E. Goodspeed, 1902), link
By Edwin Reed



Bacon and Shake-speare Parallelisms (London: Gay and Bird, 1902), link
By Edwin Reed



Bacon Vs. Shakspere: Noteworthy Opinions, Pro and Con (Boston: Coburn Publishing, 1905), link
edited by Edwin Reed



Coincidences, Bacon and Shakespeare (Boston: Coburn Publishing, 1905), link
By Edwin Reed



The Truth Concerning Stratford-upon-Avon, and Shakspere: With Other Essays Boston: Coburn Publishing, 1907), link
By Edwin Reed



The Shake-speare Drama of The Tempest (Boston: The Coburn Press, 1909), link
By William Shakespeare, edited by Edwin Reed



The Shake-speare Tragedy of Julius Csar (Boston: The Coburn Press, 1909), link
By William Shakespeare, edited by Edwin Reed
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  #563  
Old 03-08-2017, 06:55 PM
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Two more works by the acrostic guy mentioned in the post above.

The Hidden Signatures of Francesco Colonna and Francis Bacon (Boston: W. A. Butterfield, 1910), link
by William Stone Booth


A pamphlet wherein Booth manipulates a portrait of Shakespeare and a portrait of Bacon.

The Droeshout Portrait of William Shakespeare (Boston: W. A. Butterfield, 1911), link
by William Stone Booth


Another work the Friedmans discuss. They say there was never a part 2.


The Cryptography of Shakespeare, Part One (Los Angeles: Howard Brown, 1922), link
By Walter Arensberg


Both Booth and Arenberg mention Bagsley.


Is it Shakespeare? (London: John Murray, 1903), link
By Walter Begley


Bacon's Nova Resuscitatio, Volume 1 (London: Gay and Bird, 1905), link
By Walter Begley


Bacon's Nova Resuscitatio, Volume 2 (London: Gay and Bird, 1905), link
By Walter Begley


Bacon's Nova Resuscitatio, Volume 3 (London: Gay and Bird, 1905), link
By Walter Begley
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  #564  
Old 03-08-2017, 07:39 PM
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A book by Theobald, who compiled the selection of letters to the Daily Telegraph (Shakespeare Dethroned).

Shakespeare Studies in Baconian Light (London: Sampson, Low, 1901), link
by Robert Masters Theobald


An Irish judge weighs in on the Baconian side.

The Mystery of William Shakespeare: A Summary of Evidence (London: Longmans, Green, 1902), link
by Thomas Ebenezer Webb

A criticism of Theobald, with a follow-up volume.

The Baconian Mint: Its Claims Examined (London: Sampson, Low, 1903), link
by William Willis


The Baconian Mint: A Further Examination of Its Claims (London: W. H. Bartlett, 1908), link
by William Willis


A review of Webb that also criticizes Theobald.


Studies in Shakespeare (Westminster: Archibald Constable, 1904), Pages 332-369
by John Churton Collins

The Bacon Shakespeare Mania


Theobald's response to Collins

The Ethics of Criticism Illustrated by Mr. Churton Collins (London: Watts, 1904), link
by Robert Masters Theobald
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  #565  
Old 03-09-2017, 12:00 AM
Mayerling Mayerling is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TradeName View Post
A book by Theobald, who compiled the selection of letters to the Daily Telegraph (Shakespeare Dethroned).

A review of Webb that also criticizes Theobald.


Studies in Shakespeare (Westminster: Archibald Constable, 1904), Pages 332-369
by John Churton Collins

The Bacon Shakespeare Mania


Theobald's response to Collins

The Ethics of Criticism Illustrated by Mr. Churton Collins (London: Watts, 1904), link
by Robert Masters Theobald
I haven't added much recently to the interest on the thread concerning the Shakespeare-Bacon controversy. But I notice that the distinguished scholar (but an argumentative one - perhaps extremely so) John Churton Collins was involved.

Churton Collins was a great debater on English literature matters - to such an extent as to once get under the skin of Max Beerbohm, of all people, who called a lunatic. But he was more than a scholar, writer, and debater. He was a prominent amateur criminologist, and a founding member of the "murder club" known as "Our Society" with Conan Doyle and several others. On one occasion there was a discussion of the 1811 Ratcliffe Highway Murders, and he brought in the arm bone of the suspect John Williams who supposedly committed suicide in prison before any trial (P.D. James in her book on the crimes, "The Maul and the Pear Tree" feels Williams was killed in prison by bribed warders, to keep quiet about his knowledge of guilty accomplices). Collins died under somewhat murky circumstances in September 1908. He was fascinated by the Luard Murder Mystery at Sevenoakes in Kent, and had gone to have a look at the locale. He had left his inn, and was last walking about, when he failed to be accounted for after several hours. They found his dead body in a ditch, having fallen in and drowned. It was revealed that he had been ill and taking a medication that may have caused him to fall down in a drowsy state, and fall his face in the water. The inquest said it was a death from "misadventure". However one can't really tell over a century later.

Jeff
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  #566  
Old 03-13-2017, 05:57 PM
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Thanks, Jeff. Churton Collins came up earlier in this thread in connection with the "Merstham Tunnel Mystery."

A Stratfordian work.

The Bacon-Shakspere Question Answered (London: Trubner, 1889, 2nd edition), link
by Charlotte Carmichael Stopes
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  #567  
Old 03-13-2017, 07:04 PM
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A series of articles on Shakespeare knowledge of Latin by Churton Collins.


The Fortnightly Review, April 1, 1903, Pages 616-637

Had Shakespeare Read the Greek Tragedies?

Part I

by J. Churton Collins


The Fortnightly Review, May 1, 1903, Pages 848-858

Had Shakespeare Read the Greek Tragedies?

Part II

by J. Churton Collins


The Fortnightly Review, July 1, 1903, Pages 115-131

Had Shakespeare Read the Greek Tragedies?

Part III

by J. Churton Collins


J. M. Robertson, a prominent British freethinker argues that Shakespeare did not write one particular play. Robertson was mentioned earlier in this thread in connection with the con artist Springmuhl.


Did Shakespeare Write "Titus Andronicus"?; a Study in Elizabethan Literature (London: Watts & Co., 1905), link
By John Mackinnon Robertson


Greenwood was an anti-Stratfordian who did not advocate for Bacon's authorship.

The Shakespeare Problem Restated (London: John Lane, 1908), link
By Sir Granville George Greenwood


William Shakespeare, Player, Playmaker, and Poet; a Reply to Mr. George Greenwood (New York: John Lane, 1909), link
by H. C. Beeching

https://books.google.com/books?id=l9...g e&q&f=false


In Re Shakespeare: Beeching V. Greenwood; Rejoinder on Behalf of the Defendant (London: John Lane, 1909), link
By Sir Granville George Greenwood


Andrew Lang's posthumously published contribution to the Stratfordian cause.


Shakespeare, Bacon, and the Great Unknown (London: Longmans, Green, 1912), link
by Andrew Lang


Robertson returns. He deems all cryptograms, great or small, unworthy of comment,

The Baconian Heresy: A Confutation (New York: Dutton, 1913), link
by John Mackinnon Robertson


Greenwood strikes back.

Is There a Shakespeare Problem?: With a Reply to Mr. J. M. Robertson and Mr. Andrew Lang (London: John Lane, 1916), link
By Sir Granville George Greenwood


Shakespere's Handwriting (London: John Lane, 1920), link
By Sir Granville George Greenwood


Shakespeare's Law (London: Cecil Palmer, 1920), link
By Sir Granville George Greenwood


Ben Jonson and Shakespeare (London: Cecil Palmer, 1921), link
By Sir Granville George Greenwood
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  #568  
Old 03-18-2017, 07:14 PM
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Greenwood's book, Shakespeare's Handwriting, was written in response to this book, which argues that handwritten additions made to a manuscript of a play about Thomas More were written by Shakespeare, based on a comparison of the handwriting with 6 known Shakespeare signatures,

Shakespeare's Handwriting: A Study (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1916), link
By Sir Edward Maunde Thompson


The first appearance of the the suggestion that Shakespeare wrote some of the additions to the Thomas More play.

Notes and Queries, July 1, 1871, Pages 1-3

Are There Any Extant MSS. in Shakespeare's Hand?
by Richard Simpson


Spedding, a Bacon scholar, but not a Baconian, offered some partial support.


Notes and Queries, September 21, 1872, Pages 227-228

Shakespeare's Handwriting
by James Spedding


Spedding references this edition of the play.

Sir Thomas More: A Play, Now First Printed (London: Shakespeare Society, 1844), link
edited by Alexander Dyce
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  #569  
Old 03-18-2017, 07:28 PM
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Default Mark Twain

Mark Twain wrote an autobiographical work which discusses his interest in the Bacon-Shakepeare controversy dating back to the the days of Delia Bacon. Twain concludes definitely that Shakespeare did not write the plays but says it is possible that Bacon wrote them.


Is Shakespeare Dead?: From My Autobiography (New York: Harper, 1909), link
By Mark Twain


Twain's biography indicates that he was convinced by pre-publication information about Booth's "Acrostic Signatures" books that Bacon did write the plays.


Mark Twain, a Biography: The Personal and Literary Life of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Volumes 3 & 4 (New York: Harper, 1912), Pages 1479-1486
By Albert Bigelow Paine
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  #570  
Old 03-19-2017, 08:09 AM
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Default Even famous people make mistakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by TradeName View Post
Mark Twain wrote an autobiographical work which discusses his interest in the Bacon-Shakepeare controversy dating back to the the days of Delia Bacon. Twain concludes definitely that Shakespeare did not write the plays but says it is possible that Bacon wrote them.


Is Shakespeare Dead?: From My Autobiography (New York: Harper, 1909), link
By Mark Twain


Twain's biography indicates that he was convinced by pre-publication information about Booth's "Acrostic Signatures" books that Bacon did write the plays.


Mark Twain, a Biography: The Personal and Literary Life of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Volumes 3 & 4 (New York: Harper, 1912), Pages 1479-1486
By Albert Bigelow Paine
Yes, Mark Twain did become a believer in the Baconian theory of authorship.

I have read Helen Keller also did not believe that Shakespeare wrote Shakespeare.
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Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
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