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  #551  
Old 02-14-2017, 07:31 PM
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Default Constance (Mrs. Henry) Pott Part I

Constance Pott wrote a long work analyzing the Promus, a manuscript in which Francis Bacon compiled aphorisms, proverbs and epigrams. Pott claimed that many of these can be found in the Shakespeare plays. There is a preface, which does not endorse the Baconian viewpoint, by Abbott, the author of Flatland.

The Promus of Formularies and Elegancies: (Being Private Notes, Circ. 1594, hitherto unpublished) (London: Longmans, Green, 1883), link
by Mrs. Henry Pott, Francis Bacon


Pott says that one group of sayings in the Promus came from this 16th century work.

The Proverbs and Epigrams of John Heywood (A. D. 1562) (Spenser Society, 1867), link
By John Heywood

A review of Pott's book by an American scholar. His concluding summary features an unkind characterization of the Baconians.

The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 51, April, 1883, Pages 507-521

The Bacon-Shakespeare Craze
by Richard Grant White

Page 521

"[...] this Bacon-Shakespeare notion is an infatuation; a literary bee in the bonnets of certain ladies of both sexes, which should make them the objects of tender care and sympathy."


White's essay was included in a posthumous collection.

Studies in Shakespeare (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1886), Pages 151-182
by Richard Grant White

The Shakespeare-Bacon Craze

Our Friend William O'Connor defends Pott and attacks White.

Hamlet's Note-book (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1886), link
by William Douglas O'Connor

A collection of O'Connor's fiction features a story about the other Bacon (Roger).

Three Tales: The Ghost, The Brazen Android, The Carpenter (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1892), link
By William Douglas O'Connor
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  #552  
Old 02-14-2017, 07:46 PM
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Default Constance (Mrs. Henry) Pott Part II

Pott's later work connected Bacon to the Rosicrucians.


Francis Bacon and His Secret Society (Chicago: Francis J. Schulte, 1891), link
by Mrs. Henry Pott


Part I of the following lists 32 reasons for believing Bacon wrote the plays; part II is a comparative chronology of Bacon and Shakespeare.

Did Francis Bacon Write "Shakespeare"? (London: Robert Banks, 1893), link
by Mrs. Henry Pott

Part II


Quotations from Bacon and Shakespeare arranged by topic.

Obiter Dicta of Bacon and Shakespeare on Manners, Mind, Morals (London: Robert Banks, 1900), link
by Francis Bacon, Mrs. Henry Pott, William Shakespeare
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  #553  
Old 02-14-2017, 08:09 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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Re "How Shakespeare's Skull was Stolen / Circa 1794 / by a Warwickshire man"-- I recently watched this on public television:

http://www.pbs.org/show/shakespeares-tomb/

The link has online videos of part of the discussion about the missing skull and the search with ground-penetrating radar.
They also discussed how the idea might have gotten started because the marker-stone above his grave seems too short for a full-sized man.
__________________
Pat D.
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Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
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  #554  
Old 02-15-2017, 08:38 PM
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Default Ignatius Donnelly

Interesting link, Pat. Did they conclude that the spare skull could have belonged to Shakespeare?


In his memoirs, Appleton Morgan says that most of the text in this article came from a letter sent to Morgan by Ignatius Donnelly.

The Nineteenth Century, Volume 19, May, 1886, Pages 697-709

Mr. Donnelly's Shakespeare Cipher
by Percy M. Wallace


Two part article by Donnelly.

The North American Review, Volume 144, June, 1887, Pages 572-582

The Shakespeare Myth

Part I

by Ignatius Donnelly



The North American Review, Volume 145, July, 1887, Pages 57-68

The Shakespeare Myth

Part II

by Ignatius Donnelly


Hugo Black applied Francis Bacon's "bi-lateral cipher" to a transcription of a version of Shakespeare's epitaph written in mixed case. The editor of the North American Review asked Edward Gordon Clark to check Black's work.

The North American Review, Volume 145, October, 1887, Pages 422-434

"FRA BA WRT EAR AY"
by Hugo Black


Pages 426-434

"BAKON, SHAXPERE--WE"
by Edward Gordon Clark


Clark produced a book further elaborating on the "epitaph cipher."

The Tale of the Shakspere Epitaph (Chicago: Belford, Clarke, 1888), link
by Edward Gordon Clark


Two articles previewing Donnelly's book in the Daily Telegraph elicited enough letters to fill a book.

Dethroning Shakspere: A Selection of Letters Contributed to the "Daily Telegraph" (London: Sampson, Low, 1888), link
edited by Robert Masters Theobald


The first volume of Donnelly's book makes the Baconian case without relying on the alleged cipher, which is presented in the second volume.

The Great Cryptogram: Francis Bacon's Cipher in the So-Called Shakespeare Plays, Volume 1 (London: Sampson Low, 1888), link
By Ignatius Donnelly


The Great Cryptogram: Francis Bacon's Cipher in the So-called Shakespeare Plays, Volume 2 (London: Sampson Low, 1888), link
By Ignatius Donnelly


Donnelly returns to the cryptogram and has a go at the epitaph. He also drags in the Rosicrucians.

The Cipher in the Plays and on the Tombstone (Minneapolis: The Verulam Publishing Company, 1899), link
By Ignatius Donnelly


Donnelly mentions the chapter on cryptography in this children's book as an inspiration. The chapter includes a discussion of Bacon's "bi-lateral cipher."

Every Boy's Book: A Complete Encyclopędia of Sports and Amusements (London: George Routledge, 1869), Pages 674-681
edited by Edmund Routledge

Cryptography
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  #555  
Old 02-18-2017, 07:33 PM
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Default W. F. C. Wigston

Wigston wrote books in the "Bacon was a Rosicrucian" vein. His first book dismisses Delia Bacon's theory as unproven, but he later came to accept Donnelly's cryptogram.

A New Study of Shakespeare (London: Trubner, 1884), link
by William Francis C. Wigston



Bacon, Shakespeare and the Rosicrucians (London: George Redway, 1888), link
by William Francis C. Wigston



Hermes Stella: Or, Notes and Jottings Upon the Bacon Cipher (London: George Redway, 1890), link
by William Francis C. Wigston



Francis Bacon, Poet, Prophet, Philosopher, Versus Phantom Captain Shakespeare (London: Kegan Paul, 1891), link
by William Francis C. Wigston



The Columbus of Literature: Or, Bacon's New World of Sciences (Chicago: F. J. Schulte, 1892), link
By William Francis C. Wigston
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  #556  
Old 02-18-2017, 08:01 PM
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Default Orville Ward Owen

Owen used some sort of word selection cipher on the Shakespeare plays and other works of that time to reveal that Bacon was the natural son of Queen Elizabeth.


Sir Francis Bacon's Cipher Story, Volume 1 (Detroit: Howard Publishing, 1893), link
by Orville Ward Owen


Sir Francis Bacon's Cipher Story, Volume 2 (Detroit: Howard Publishing, 1894), link
by Orville Ward Owen


Sir Francis Bacon's Cipher Story, Volume 3 (Detroit: Howard Publishing, 1894), link
by Orville Ward Owen


Sir Francis Bacon's Cipher Story, Volume 4 (Detroit: Howard Publishing, 1894), link
by Orville Ward Owen


Sir Francis Bacon's Cipher Story, Volume 5 (Detroit: Howard Publishing, 1895), link
by Orville Ward Owen


Owen's story prompted a review of rumors about Elizabeth.

Other Times and Other Seasons (New York: Harper and Brothesr, 1895), Pages 95-104
by Laurence Hutton

A Gammon of Bacon in Elizabeth's Reign
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  #557  
Old 02-19-2017, 01:33 AM
jason_c jason_c is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pcdunn View Post
Re "How Shakespeare's Skull was Stolen / Circa 1794 / by a Warwickshire man"-- I recently watched this on public television:

http://www.pbs.org/show/shakespeares-tomb/

The link has online videos of part of the discussion about the missing skull and the search with ground-penetrating radar.
They also discussed how the idea might have gotten started because the marker-stone above his grave seems too short for a full-sized man.
I don't know what I am getting involved in here. The Shakespeare controversy seems to be a mile off from the original discussion and im unsure how relevant Shakespeare is to the thread, or how we got here. However, Shakespeare's life & times and the authorship question is my pet subject. With regards to the supposedly missing skull:

I was disappointed with the Channel 4 documentary on Shakespeare's grave. At face value it looked quite detailed and professional documentary. However, it deliberately mislead. It left out some very pertinent information that any decent researcher should have known; that Shakespeare's entire skeleton is probably missing and has been for some time. This below is from the American writer, Washington Irving. Irving toured Stratford in the late 18th century. Here is Irving detailing a conversation he had with an old sexton of the Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-on-Avon:


"The inscription on the tombstone has not
been without its effect. It has prevented the
removal of his remains from the bosom of his
native place to Westminster Abbey, which was
at one time contemplated. A few years since
also, as some labourers were digging to make an
adjoining vault, the earth caved in, so as to
leave a vacant space almost like an arch,
through which one might have reached into his
grave. No one, however, presumed to meddle
with his remains, so awfully guarded by a
malediction ; and lest any of the idle or the
curious, or any collector of relics, should be
tempted to commit depredations, the old sexton
kept watch over the place ^for two days, until
the vault was finished, and the aperture closed
again. (22) He told me that he had made bold to
look in at the hole, but could see neither coffin
nor bones; nothing but dust. It was something,
I thought, to have seen the dust of Shakespeare."[
/I]

This isn't cast iron proof that Shakespeare's bones have disappeared, but I would think it pertinent information to a documentary dealing with Shakespeare's skull & bones. Yet the documentary failed to mention this passage from the only person who claims to have seen inside the grave.

Tradename, the skull in question was determined not to have been Shakespeare's. From memory it was determined to have been a female skull.

Last edited by jason_c : 02-19-2017 at 01:35 AM.
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  #558  
Old 02-25-2017, 08:23 PM
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Default Eliazbeth Wells Gallup, Part I

Thanks for the information about Washington Irving and about the spare skull, jason_c.

Elizabeth Wells Gallup had assisted Orville Owen in preparing his books about Bacon's "word cipher." Later, she produced her own decoded messages from the Shakespeare plays, Bacon's writings and other works. She claimed that they had been encoded using Bacon's "Bi-lateral cipher" through the intermixing of two distinct fonts in printing the books.

I'll link to the Friedmans' book again, since it devotes considerable space to the Gallup cipher.

The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined, link (see PDF download link on right side of page.)
1957

Author: William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press


The Friedmans had become acquainted with Gallup while both worked at the private Riverbank Laboratories, run by a man interested in the Bacon-Shakepeare controversy. William Friedman went on the a career in cryptanalysis for the US government.

A brief bio of William Friendman on the NSA site.


The Friedmans did not accept the validity of Gallup's decipherings, but viewed her as an honest person



Second edition of Gallup's first book.

The Bi-literal Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon (Detroit: Howard Publishing, 1900), link
by Elizabeth Wells Gallup

Parts I & II


Third edition

The Bi-literal Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon (London: Gay & Bird, 1901), link
by Elizabeth Wells Gallup

Parts I & II


An entire play deciphered, which incorporates re-purposed passages from the Shakespeare plays.

The Tragedy of Anne Boleyn: A Drama in Cipher Found in the Works of Sir Francis Bacon (Detroit: Howard Publishing, 1901), link
by Mrs. Elizabeth Wells Gallup

a notice of the above work.

The Publishers' Circular, Volume 76, January 4, 1902, Page 5

Another "Bacon" Tragedy


The third part of Gallup's work.

The Bi-literal Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon (Detroit: Howard Publishing, 1910), link
by Elizabeth Wells Gallup

Part III


A follow-up work by a student of Gallup's


Studies in the Bi-literal Cipher of Francis Bacon (Boston: John W. Luce, 1913), link
By Gertrude Horsford Fiske, Elizabeth Wells Gallup
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  #559  
Old 02-25-2017, 08:32 PM
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Default Elizabeth Wells Gallup, Part II

Three articles discussing Gallup's first book. The third article, by Martson, finds parallels between what Gallup claimed was Bacon's translation of the Iliad and a later translation by Pope.

The Nineteenth Century, Volume 50, December, 1901, Pages 920-935

New Light on the Bacon-Shakespeare Cypher

by W. H. Mallock



The Nineteenth Century, Volume 51, January, 1902, Pages 39-49

Mrs. Gallup's Cypher Story

A Reply to Mr. Mallock

by H. Candler



The Nineteenth Century, Volume 51, January, 1902, Pages 50-59

Mrs. Gallup's Cypher Story

Part II

Bacon-Shakespeare-Pope

by R. B. Marston


I couldn't find Gallup's full reply to the Marston article, but here is a notice of it.

The Publishers' Circular, August 2, 1902, Page 93

'Unfounded and Libelous Charges'

'A Sealed Bag of Papers at the Record Office'

An Appeal to His Majesty the King


A follow-up to Marston's article in the journal of the Bacon Society.


Baconiana, January, 1906, Pages 14-23

Bacon and Pope

by W. Theobald
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  #560  
Old 02-25-2017, 08:41 PM
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Default Elizabeth Wells Gallup Part III

More critics, more replies.


Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Volume 26, March, 1902, Pages 393-401

The Bi-Lateral Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon

A New Light on a Few Old Books

by Elizabeth Wells Gallup


Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Volume 26, April, 1902, Pages 484-489

"Francis Bacon's Bi-Lateral Cypher"

A Report

by John Holt Schooling


Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Volume 27, May, 1902, Pages 123-131

"The Bi-Lateral Cypher" of Sir Francis Bacon

A Reply to certain Critics

by Elizabeth Wells Gallup


Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Volume 27, 1902, Pages 368-370

Mrs. Gallup and Bacon

by Andrew Lang


Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Volume 29, January, 1903, Pages 77-89

New Facts Relating to the Bacon-Shakespeare Question

Part I

by W.H. Mallock


Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Volume 29, February, 1903, Pages 215-228

New Facts Relating to the Bacon-Shakespeare Question

Part II

by W.H. Mallock
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