Casebook: Jack the Ripper - Main
   

Introduction
Victims
Suspects
Witnesses
Ripper Letters
Police Officials
Official Documents
Press Reports
Victorian London
Message Boards
Ripper Media
Authors
Dissertations
Timelines
Games & Diversions
Photo Archive
Ripper Wiki
Casebook Examiner
Ripper Podcast
About the Casebook

Most Recent Posts:
Goulston Street Graffito: The GSG - Did Jack write it? POLL - by Joshua Rogan 1 hour and 28 minutes ago.
Goulston Street Graffito: The GSG - Did Jack write it? POLL - by Elamarna 2 hours ago.
Goulston Street Graffito: The GSG - Did Jack write it? POLL - by Joshua Rogan 2 hours ago.
Goulston Street Graffito: The GSG - Did Jack write it? POLL - by Sam Flynn 3 hours ago.
Goulston Street Graffito: The GSG - Did Jack write it? POLL - by Sam Flynn 3 hours ago.
Goulston Street Graffito: The GSG - Did Jack write it? POLL - by Trevor Marriott 3 hours ago.

Most Popular Threads:
Goulston Street Graffito: The GSG - Did Jack write it? POLL - (68 posts)
Maybrick, James: 25 YEARS OF THE DIARY OF JACK THE RIPPER: THE TRUE FACTS by Robert Smith - (11 posts)
Annie Chapman: Annie's scarf - (3 posts)
Casebook Announcements: Rip Don Souden - (1 posts)

Wiki Updates:
Robert Sagar
Edit: Chris
May 9, 2015, 12:32 am
Online newspaper archives
Edit: Chris
Nov 26, 2014, 10:25 am
Joseph Lawende
Edit: Chris
Mar 9, 2014, 10:12 am
Miscellaneous research resources
Edit: Chris
Feb 13, 2014, 9:28 am
Charles Cross
Edit: John Bennett
Sep 4, 2013, 8:20 pm

Most Recent Blogs:
Mike Covell: A DECADE IN THE MAKING.
February 19, 2016, 11:12 am.
Chris George: RipperCon in Baltimore, April 8-10, 2016
February 10, 2016, 2:55 pm.
Mike Covell: Hull Prison Visit
October 10, 2015, 8:04 am.
Mike Covell: NEW ADVENTURES IN RESEARCH
August 9, 2015, 3:10 am.
Mike Covell: UPDDATES FOR THE PAST 11 MONTHS
November 14, 2014, 10:02 am.
Mike Covell: Mike’s Book Releases
March 17, 2014, 3:18 am.

Go Back   Casebook Forums > Ripper Discussions > Witnesses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #31  
Old 06-11-2017, 04:41 AM
jason_c jason_c is offline
Sergeant
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 782
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddy View Post
Maybe it was just a cultural difference Simon, someone maybe who had over exaggerated speech and mannerisms (not common to the british).

Or could they have meant somebody who appeared gay? Or the clothing?
Hard to say.
What were London theatrical men like back then I wonder?

Pat.......
This is what I had previously suspected on here but the idea was dismissed. I have an amateur interest in Shakespeare. I remember reading that Shakespeare's ear-ring signified roughly what ear-rings do today; a bit flamboyant and fashionable. I think Schwartz may have worn Victorian equivalent of a bit of bling, and perhaps a few frills on his clothing too. Im imagining Schwartz looking part gypsy, part dandy. Perhaps with a fetching looking hat.

Last edited by jason_c : 06-11-2017 at 04:49 AM.
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 06-11-2017, 04:43 AM
jason_c jason_c is offline
Sergeant
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 782
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert View Post
Flamboyantly, I suppose, but I don't think we're talking Quentin Crisp here.
This made me laugh.
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 06-11-2017, 06:45 AM
Wickerman Wickerman is offline
Commisioner
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,671
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael W Richards View Post
My guess would be, for the period, somewhat loudly Simon. Mismatched patterns, dramatic moustache, that kind of thing. Attention seeking.
Schwartz being in "the theatrical line" must surely mean in an official capacity; managerial staff or official.

Henry Irving was not only a leading man, but a theater manager.
His street attire reflects his position in life. Here he is seen leaving the Lyceum (in top hat - center).
Apologies for the size of this pic, didn't have the means to reduce it.



Victorian Britain being the distinctly class-based society it was expected everyone to dress according to their position in life.
Today we find this difficult to visualize, we cannot tell a banker from a doctor, a lawyer, or a clerk. But in the 19th century there were very definite articles of clothing which set one profession aside from another.
__________________
Regards, Jon S.

Last edited by Wickerman : 06-11-2017 at 06:48 AM.
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 06-18-2017, 09:20 AM
joelhall joelhall is offline
Detective
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: aylesbury, buckinghamshire
Posts: 485
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Wood View Post
Hi All,

Israel Schwartz.

How must a person be dressed in order to have the "appearance of being in the theatrical line"? [Star, 1st October 1888].

Regards,

Simon
I would imagine he would have looked as if he were dressed in theatrical garb: I.e. what a Londoner may have thought when looking at a Haredi man.
__________________
if mickey's a mouse, and pluto's a dog, whats goofy?
Quick reply to this message Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.