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  #571  
Old 03-27-2017, 06:58 PM
TradeName TradeName is offline
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Funny you should mention Helen Keller, Pat. It seems that it was the husband of Anne Sullivan who brought the pre-publication information about William Stone Booth to Mark Twain.


Autobiography of Mark Twain, Volume 3: The Complete and Authoritative Edition (Oakland: University of California Press, 2015), Pages 299-300
by Mark Twain

"Well, two or three weeks from now a bombshell will fall upon us which may possibly woundily astonish the human race! For there is secretly and privately a book in press in Boston, by an English clergyman, which may unhorse Shakespeare permanently and put Bacon in the saddle. Once more the acrostic will be in the ascendant, and this time it may be that some people will think twice before they laugh at it. That wonder of wonders, Helen Keller, has been here on a three days' visit with her devoted teachers and protectors Mr. and Mrs. John Macy, and Macy has told me about the clergyman's book and bound me to secrecy."


Links to some publications of the London Bacon Society.


Journal of the Bacon Society, Volume 1, (London: George Redway,1886-1888), link


Journal of the Bacon Society, Volume 2 (London: Robert Banks, 1888-1891), link



Baconiana, Volume 1 New Series (London: Robert Banks, 1893), link

e
Baconiana, Volume 2 New Series (London: Robert Banks, 1894), link


Baconiana, Volume 3 New Series (London: Robert Banks, 1895), link


Baconiana, Volume 4 New Series (London: Robert Banks, 1896), link


Baconiana, Volume 5 New Series (London: Robert Banks, 1897), link


Baconiana, Volume 6 New Series (London: John Hodges, 1898), link


Baconiana, Volumes 7 New Series (London: Robert Banks, 1899), link


Baconiana, Volumes 8 New Series (London: Robert Banks, 1900), link


Baconiana, Volumes 9 New Series (London: Robert Banks, 1901), link



Baconiana, Volume 1 Third Series (Lonodn: Gay & Bird, 1903), link


Baconiana, Volume 2 Third Series (Lonodn: Gay & Bird, 1904), link


Baconiana, Volume 3 Third Series (Lonodn: Gay & Bird, 1905), link


Baconiana, Volume 4 Third Series (Lonodn: Gay & Bird, 1906), link


Baconiana, Volume 5 Third Series (Lonodn: Gay & Bird, 1907), link


Baconiana, Volume 6 Third Series (Lonodn: Gay & Bird, 1908), link
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  #572  
Old 03-28-2017, 10:14 AM
Mayerling Mayerling is offline
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Mr. John Macy was a prominent critic and writer on American literature. I have read a book by him about the most important American writers of the 19th Century. Hence his relationship (outside of Annie Sullivan Macy and Helen Keller) with Clemens (Twain).
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  #573  
Old 04-02-2017, 06:22 PM
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Thanks, Jeff.

Henry Irving's name came up now and again in the discussions of the Bacon/Shakespeare controversy. In 1888, an 8 volume "Henry Irving edition" of the Shakespeare plays began publishing.

In his memoirs of Irving, Bram Stoker mentions H. H. Kohlsaat as a "close and valued friend" of Irving and Stoker, and relates an anecdote about Kohlsaat and Conan Doyle. Kohlsaat bought the Chicago Times-Herald very shortly before that paper ran the April 28, 1895, article about R. J. Lees and JtR.


The Henry Irving Shakespeare


The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 1 London: Blackie & Son, 1888), link
by William Shakespeare, Henry Irving, Frank A. Marshall, Edward Dowden


The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 2 (London: Blackie & Son, 1888), link
by William Shakespeare, Henry Irving, Frank A. Marshall, Edward Dowden


The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 3 (London: Blackie & Son, 1889), link
by William Shakespeare, Henry Irving, Frank A. Marshall, Edward Dowden


The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 4 (London: Blackie & Son, 1888), link
by William Shakespeare, Henry Irving, Frank A. Marshall, Edward Dowden


The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 5 (London: Blackie & Son, 1889), link
by William Shakespeare, Henry Irving, Frank A. Marshall, Edward Dowden


The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 6 (London: Blackie & Son, 1889), link
by William Shakespeare, Henry Irving, Frank A. Marshall, Edward Dowden


The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 7 (London: Blackie & Son, 1890), link
by William Shakespeare, Henry Irving, Frank A. Marshall, Edward Dowden


The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 8 (London: Blackie & Son, 1890), link
by William Shakespeare, Henry Irving, Frank A. Marshall, Edward Dowden


Notice of Kohlsaat's purchase of the Chicago Times-Herald.

New York Times, April 21, 1895, abstract link, PDF link

TWO CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS SOLD; H.H. Kohlsaat Gets Control of the Times-Herald and Post -- Will Oppose the Free Coinage of Silver.

CHICAGO, April 20. -- The control of The Times-Herald and Evening Post passed into the hands of Herman H. Kohlsaat, formerly publisher of The Inter-Ocean, this afternoon, and he assumed charge of the consolidated journal to-night. [...]



Stoker's anecdote about Kohlsaat.


Personal Reminiscences of Henry Irving, Volume 1 (London: William heinneman, 1906), Pages 249-251
By Bram Stoker

In the first week of the tour at the Princes Theatre, Bristol, on September 21, 1894, A Story of Waterloo was given. The matter was one of considerable importance in the dramatic world; not only was Irving to play a new piece, but that piece was Conan Doyle's first attempt at the drama. The chief newspapers of London and some of the greater provincial cities wished to be represented on the occasion; the American press also wished to send its critical contingent. Accordingly we arranged for a special train to bring the critical force. Hearing that so many of his London journalistic friends were coming an old friend of living's then resident in Bristol, Mr. John Saunders, arranged to give a supper in the Liberal Club, to which they were all invited, together with many persons of local importance.

The play met with a success extraordinary even for Irving. The audience followed with rapt attention and manifest emotion, swaying with the varying sentiments of the scene. The brief aid to memory in my diary of that day runs:

"New play enormous success. H. I. fine and great. All laughed and wept. Marvellous study of senility. Eight calls at end."

Unfortunately the author was not present to share the triumph, for it would have been a delightful memory for him. He was on a tour in America; "and thereby hangs a tale."

Amongst the audience who had come specially from London was Mr. H. H. Kohlsaat, owner and editor of the Chicago Times Herald, a close and valued friend of Irving and myself. He was booked to leave for America the next day. When the play was over and the curtain finally down, he hurried away just in time to catch the train for Southampton, whence the American Line boat started in the morning. He got on board all right. The following Saturday he arrived in New York, just in time to catch the "flyer," as they call the fast train to Chicago on the New York Central line. On Sunday night a public dinner was given to Conan Doyle, to which of course Kohlsaat had been bidden. He arrived too late for the dining part; but having dressed in the train he came on to the hotel just as dinner was finished and before the speeches began. He took a chair next to Doyle and said to him:

"I am delighted to tell you that your play at Bristol was an enormous success!"

"So I am told," said Doyle modestly. "The cables are excellent."

"They are not half enough!" answered Kohlsaat, who had been reading in the train the papers for the last week.

"Indeed! I am rejoiced to hear it!" said Conan Doyle somewhat dubiously. "May I ask if you have had any special report?"

"I didn't need any report, I saw it!"

"Oh, 'come!" said Conan Doyle, who thought that he was in some way chaffing him. "That is impossible!"

"Not to me! But I am in all human probability the only man on the American continent who was there!" Then whilst the gratified author listened he gave him a full description of the play and the scene which followed it.

----end

An article about a Doyle appearance in Chicago in 1894.

Chicago Tribune, October 27, 1894, Page 1, Column 3

Speaks of His Pen

A. Conan Doyle Delivers a Lecture about Himself

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  #574  
Old 04-17-2017, 06:22 PM
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The only thing I could find about Henry Irving's attitude toward spiritualism was that he gave some performances aimed at debunking the Davenport brothers.

Henry Irving: A Biographical Sketch (London: David Bouge, 1883), Pages 81-85
by Austin Brereton

APPENDIX.

THE EXPOSURE OF THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS.

The exposure, at this period (February, 1865), of the imposture of the notorious Davenport Brothers was a somewhat remarkable episode in which Irving had a leading part. During the winter of 1864-65, the whole of credulous England was disturbed by the statements made by these men, and the effects which they produced in their "dark seances," pretending to be based on occult spiritual power, were beginning to have a very deleterious effect on certain classes. It was openly claimed by the showman of the party, the notorious Reverend Doctor Ferguson, that the effects produced were manifestations of the Divine power. In several towns there had almost been riots, and two very strong currents of public feeling ran in opposite directions. Hitherto it had been found impossible to detect the imposture; the nearest approach being the failure of the brothers to untie themselves caused in Liverpool by the adaptation by the tying committee of the "tom-fool" knot. Manchester had been invaded by the tricksters, and the number of the dupes had swelled immensely. The feeling of the adverse faction was caught and crystallised into action by the invention and skill of Henry Irving, and his friends Mr. Frederick Maccabe and Mr. Phillip Day. Irving was attracted to the seance by the public interest awakened, and after seeing the effect produced, determined to expose the shameful impostures; to the manner of doing it he was probably incited by the remarkable appearance and unctuous delivery of the Reverend Doctor Ferguson. Having pondered over the means possible of producing the "effects" by which the Davenport Brothers produced such startling results, he secured the aid of his two friends, the result being a private performance before some friends at a popular club. The effort was so successful that the news got abroad. The club entertainment became an open secret, and the performers were asked to give a repetition in some place capable of holding a large number of the persons interested in the question. Accordingly, on the afternoon of Saturday, February 25th, 1865, the Library Hall of the Manchester Athenaeum was crowded with an intelligent audience, to witness a display of "preternatural philosophy" in a "private Seance a la Davenport," provided by some well-known members of the theatrical profession then playing in the city. The proceedings were commenced by Mr. Henry Irving, who was loudly applauded on making his appearance. He said:

"Ladies and Gentlemen,—-In introducing to you our experiments in what we, perhaps, have ostentatiously called 'preternatural philosophy,' I propose to explain to you as briefly as possible how this meeting has taken place, and the end we have in view in giving this semi-public stance. The performance of the Davenport Brothers was of a nature to fill some minds with wonderment, some to puzzle and perplex, whilst many who would not own to either took to derision and laughter. Three gentlemen, two of whom I shall have the honour of introducing to you [Mr. Irving himself being one of the three], proved exceptions to what appears to have been the rule in the Davenport audiences. They were neither astonished, perplexed, nor bewildered, nor did they content themselves by treating the affair with levity, but in a matter-of-fact way they said, 'Here are effects apparently marvellous; there is no effect without a cause; these things are done somehow. If they are done by a supernatural power we cannot accomplish the same; but if by a natural power, why then we can also—-if we discover the somehow. Acting upon this, and beginning with the first axiom in Euclid, that the nearest way from one given point to another is by a straight line, they procured a line, and proceeded like two philosophers to experimentalise. The result was a complete knowledge of the somehow, and a full discovery of the trick. At a social gathering some ten days ago (prior to the rather rough and unsatisfactory Liverpool demonstration), a few friends were amused by a burlesque stance a la Davenport, in which I had rather the equivocal honour of impersonating a certain reverend doctor. The result was so complete a reproduction of all the phenomena, that a committee was formed for the purpose of holding this assembly in which our object is something more than mere amusement. What do the band of brothers profess to teach? What purpose beyond lining their pockets with money do they desire to obtain? They indignantly declined to be called conjurors; and while not venturing to define what was the precise nature of the occult power they professed to exercise, they wished people to understand that they were in some way connected with spiritualism—-that, in their own words, they were producing a new hope for all mankind. So, ladies and gentlemen, if we can succeed in destroying the blasphemous pretensions of the unlicensed spirit dealers, our object will be attained, and this meeting will not have been held in vain. I will assume, as well as I am able, the appearance and manner of the doctor, and endeavour as hastily as possible to introduce him to you as our 'media.'"

The rapid assumption of a wig and beard, with a few artistic facial touches, a neckerchief of the approved sort, and a tightly buttoned surtout, soon changed Irving into an admirable "double" of the renowned Doctor Ferguson, who, be it always remembered, claimed to be not only the pastor of an existing church, but the Avatar of a new religion, of which spiritualism was the revelation. The resemblance was so striking as to cause immense amusement. Coming forward with the grave demeanour of his original, Irving delivered the following characteristic address, accompanying it with tone, accent, expression, and gesture which were irresistible in their ludicrous likeness to nature—-the nctuous showman being, in fact, exactly reproduced: —-

"Ladies and Gentlemen,—-In introducing to your notice the remarkable phenomena which have attended the gentlemen, who are not brothers—-(laughter)—-who are about to appear before you, I do not deem it necessary to offer any observations upon their extraordinary manifestations. I shall therefore at once commence a long rigmarole—-(laughter)—-for the purpose of distracting your attention, and filling your intelligent heads with perplexity. (Laughter.) I need not tell this enlightened audience of the gigantic discoveries that have and are being made in the unfathomable abyss of science. I need not tell this enlightened audience (because if I did they would not believe me), (Laughter.) I say I need not tell this enlightened audience that the manifestations they are about to witness are produced by occult power—-the meaning of which I don't clearly understand—-(laughter)-—but we simply bring before your notice facts, and from these you must form your own conclusions. (Hear, hear, and renewed laughter.) Concerning the early life of these gentlemen, columns of the most uninteresting description could be written. (Laughter.) I will mention one or two interesting facts connected with these remarkable men, and for the truth of which I personally vouch. In early life one of them, to the perfect unconcern of everybody else, was constantly and most unconsciously floating about his peaceful dwelling in the arms of his amiable nurse—-(laughter)—-while, on other occasions, he was frequently tied with invisible hands to his mother's apron strings. (Renewed laughter.) Peculiarities of a like nature were exhibited by his companion, whose acquaintance with various spirits commenced many years ago, and has increased to the present moment with pleasure to himself and profit to others. (Roars of laughter.) These gentlemen have not been celebrated throughout the vast continent of America, they have not astonished the most civilised world, but they have travelled in various parts of this glorious land—-the land of Bacon—-(laughter)—-and are about to appear in a phase in your glorious city of Manchester. (Laughter.) Many really sensible and intelligent individuals seem to think that the requirement of darkness seems to infer trickery. (Laughter.) So it does. (Cheers.) But I will strive to convince you that it does not . (Hear, hear.) Is not a dark chamber essential to the process of photography? and what would we reply to him who would say 'I believe photography is a humbug—-do it all in the light, and we will believe otherwise?' It is true we know why darkness is essential to the production of a sun picture; and if scientific men will subject these phenomena to analysis, they will find why darkness is essential to our manifestations. (Laughter.) But we don't want them to find—-(laughter)—-we want them to avoid a common-sense view of the mystery. (Laughter.) We want them to be blinded by our puzzle, and to believe with implicit faith in the greatest humbug of the nineteenth century." (Loud applause and laughter.)

Justice to Irving cannot be done by any mere record of this speech. Frequent bursts of applause followed the "points" made and the hints given, while a staid and dignified gravity recalled to the minds of his listeners the unctuous manner of the mentor of the Davenports. With the same serious face and action he turned to introduce his friends, and the pleasant and familiar faces of Messrs. Frederick Maccabe and Phillip Day, of the Princes' Theatre, appeared upon the platform—-the two professional brothers quietly taking their places to be bound on each side of the cabinet.

The process of tying then commenced, the audience keeping up a running fire of commentary, which the "Doctor" aptly and wittily answered. The brothers were placed in the cabinet, bound securely hand and foot, and with them were placed a guitar, a tambourine, a bell, and a trumpet. Directly on the doors being closed the manifestations commenced. Hands were shown at the aperture and discordant noises commenced within the cabinet. The tambourine and guitar were played, dogs barked, and cats mewed, and a variety of sounds were heard which, as the "Doctor" said, could not possibly emanate from the human voice. The trumpet was thrown out repeatedly. A gentleman near the platform asked the "Doctor" to be careful that the instrument did not do some damage. The "Doctor" said he could not be answerable for any demonstrations the spirits liked to produce. He asked a gentleman if he had been struck. The gentleman replied, "No;" upon which the "Doctor" said he hoped this was a convincing proof that the manifestations were guided by an intelligent power. On the doors being repeatedly opened, the "brothers" appeared bound as before. At length they walked forth from the cabinet freed from the fetters, They re-bound themselves; one of the committee took his seat in the cabinet, and flour being placed in their hands, the exact Davenport programme was gone through with the most complete success. The dark seance which followed was a wonderful imitation of the Davenport illusions. No effect which the Davenports produced was left undone, but in the course of the "stance " all their performances were exactly reproduced. The musical instruments were seen floating through the air—-the coats of the bound men were exchanged. The "manifestations" took place amidst sundry well-directed remarks and witticisms from the "Doctor." He insisted upon an unbroken chain of contact, "else," said he, "you may be touched in places you least expect." "In the pocket!" cried one gentleman. "Yes," came the repartee, as quick as lightning from the quasi doctor: "In the pocket, or in the head, or in any other empty receptacle." Irving's impersonation was indeed quite a triumph of real imitative art. Never for a moment did he lose his "identity," but kept the audience in constant merriment by his happy and apt remarks.

At the close of the scene, a vote of thanks to the performers was carried by vehement acclamation. Amid renewed cheers, calls were made for the "Doctor." Irving came forward, and after a few words of thanks in his assumed guise, tore off his whiskers and beard, and bowed his thanks.

It is to be remembered that this exhibition was entirely free, the tickets having been given away. In connection with the exposure, which was, by public desire, repeated on the following Saturday in the Free Trade Hall, all the gentlemen participating refused testimonials of any kind. Immediately after the first exhibition the Manchester papers were full of letters advocating a testimonial, but the honour was firmly declined. The immediate effect of the occasion on which he created such an impression was to lose Irving his engagement at the Theatre Royal, he declining to make capital out of the success of the exposure of the imposture by repeating the performance nightly at the theatre.

----end
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  #575  
Old 05-06-2017, 07:21 PM
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I was reading the introduction of Powers of Darkness, a translation of the Icelandic version of Dracula, and noticed that it mentions (pages 41-42) that Henry Irving and Bram Stoker were acquainted with Frederic H. W. Myers of the Society for Psychical Research.

The writer of the introduction, Hans C. de Roos, cites this passage from Stoker's memoir:

Personal Reminiscences of Henry Irving, Volume 2 (New York: Macmillan, 1906)
by Bram Stoker

Pages 248-249

[After Irving delivered a lecture at Cambridge University in June, 1898:]

The next morning there was a delightful breakfast in the house of Frederick Myers —- Mrs. Myers, formerly Miss [Eveleen] Tennant, was an old friend of Irving. Lord Dufferin was the youngest of the party, despite his seventy-two years. I think the Marquis of Dufferin and Ava had the most winning manner of any man I ever met. There was a natural sweetness of the heart and an infinite humour from the head whose combination was simply irresistible. His humour was of enormous and wide-embracing range, and touched with illumination whatever subject he talked of. He and Irving had much to say to each other. The rest who were present wished to hear them both; and so there was silence when either spoke. Irving seemed quite charmed with Lord Dufferin and gave way to him altogether. The picture rises before me of the scene in the study of Frederick Myers after breakfast, well shown by the wide window opening out on the beautiful garden behind the house. Seated on the high fender with padded top, with his back to the fireplace, sat Lord Dufferin, and round him in a close circle —- the young girls being the closest and looking with admiring eyes —- the whole of the rest of the party. His clear, sweet, exquisitely modulated voice seemed to suit the sunshine and the universal brightness of the place. Lord Dufferin's voice seemed to rise and fall, to quicken or come slowly by a sort of selective instinct. It struck me as being naturally one of the most expressive voices I had ever heard.

----end

A collection of Myers' poetry includes an autobiographical section.

Fragments of Prose & Poetry (London: Longmans, Green, 1904), link
by Frederic William Henry Myers


A portrait of Eveleen Tennant, Myers' wife and Irving's friend, is here.

A two volume work co-authored by Myers.

Phantasms of the Living, Volume 1 (London: Trubner, 1886), link
by Edmund Gurney, Frederic William Henry Myers, Frank Podmore, Society for Psychical Research (Great Britain)


Phantasms of the Living, Volume 2 (London: Trubner, 1886), link
by Edmund Gurney, Frederic William Henry Myers, Frank Podmore, Society for Psychical Research (Great Britain)
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Old 05-06-2017, 09:10 PM
Mayerling Mayerling is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TradeName View Post
I was reading the introduction of Powers of Darkness, a translation of the Icelandic version of Dracula, and noticed that it mentions (pages 41-42) that Henry Irving and Bram Stoker were acquainted with Frederic H. W. Myers of the Society for Psychical Research.

The writer of the introduction, Hans C. de Roos, cites this passage from Stoker's memoir:

Personal Reminiscences of Henry Irving, Volume 2 (New York: Macmillan, 1906)
by Bram Stoker

Pages 248-249

[After Irving delivered a lecture at Cambridge University in June, 1898:]

The next morning there was a delightful breakfast in the house of Frederick Myers —- Mrs. Myers, formerly Miss [Eveleen] Tennant, was an old friend of Irving. Lord Dufferin was the youngest of the party, despite his seventy-two years. I think the Marquis of Dufferin and Ava had the most winning manner of any man I ever met. There was a natural sweetness of the heart and an infinite humour from the head whose combination was simply irresistible. His humour was of enormous and wide-embracing range, and touched with illumination whatever subject he talked of. He and Irving had much to say to each other. The rest who were present wished to hear them both; and so there was silence when either spoke. Irving seemed quite charmed with Lord Dufferin and gave way to him altogether. The picture rises before me of the scene in the study of Frederick Myers after breakfast, well shown by the wide window opening out on the beautiful garden behind the house. Seated on the high fender with padded top, with his back to the fireplace, sat Lord Dufferin, and round him in a close circle —- the young girls being the closest and looking with admiring eyes —- the whole of the rest of the party. His clear, sweet, exquisitely modulated voice seemed to suit the sunshine and the universal brightness of the place. Lord Dufferin's voice seemed to rise and fall, to quicken or come slowly by a sort of selective instinct. It struck me as being naturally one of the most expressive voices I had ever heard.

----end

A collection of Myers' poetry includes an autobiographical section.

Fragments of Prose & Poetry (London: Longmans, Green, 1904), link
by Frederic William Henry Myers


A portrait of Eveleen Tennant, Myers' wife and Irving's friend, is here.

A two volume work co-authored by Myers.

Phantasms of the Living, Volume 1 (London: Trubner, 1886), link
by Edmund Gurney, Frederic William Henry Myers, Frank Podmore, Society for Psychical Research (Great Britain)


Phantasms of the Living, Volume 2 (London: Trubner, 1886), link
by Edmund Gurney, Frederic William Henry Myers, Frank Podmore, Society for Psychical Research (Great Britain)
Edmund Gurney was a leading figure in the study of Pscychic Phenomenon. He was involved in serious research in the late 1880s in Brighton regarding what we might consider as ESP. Then, in June 1888 (ah, such a fatal year) he was found dead from an overdose of chloroform in a hotel room in Brighton. There has been considerable debate about his death (accident, suicide, possibly even murder). He may have been disillusioned when he found that the cause of his successful results was trickery due to the stage abilities of his associate, the theatre producer George Smith (later a valuable producer of early British silent movies). See Trevor Hall's interesting (but not fully accepted) study, "The Strange Death of Edmund Gurney". The Wikipedia article discusses the problem of Gurney's death (in the article on Gurney) a little.

Jeff

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  #577  
Old 05-12-2017, 06:44 PM
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Interesting, Jeff.

Here's a brief notice of Gurney's death.

The Athenaeum, June 30, 1888, Page 827

MR. EDMUND GURNEY.

WE regret to announce the death by misadventure of Mr. Edmund Gurney, author of ‘The Power of Sound’ and other works. The deceased, who was born about 1847, was the son of the Rev. Hampden Gurney, sometime Rector of Marylebone, and was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, of which college he became a Fellow. His large work, above mentioned, on the philosophy of music, may be said to have attained a standard position, and it has been more discussed in Germany than in England. Its singularly acute exposure of many current fallacies in musical theory and criticism was combined with much original and constructive thought and deep musical feeling. Mr. Gurney was also the principal author of ‘Phantasms of the Living,' and was widely known as the energetic hon. secretary of the Society for Psychical Research, of which society, indeed, he may be said to have been the mainspring. Mr. Gurney's latest publication, two volumes of essays, collected under the title of ‘Tertium Quid,” was recently noticed in these columns. The deceased suffered from obstinate sleeplessness and occasional neuralgia, prompting recourse to opiates, though he was in full social and literary activity. He succumbed to an overdose of chloroform, incautiously taken when alone at an hotel at Brighton. The body was identified by a letter, found in his coat, inviting a friend to join him in the business on which he had visited Brighton. He was a man who attracted very strong attachments, and he will be deeply mourned.

----end

A collection of essays by Gurney.

Tertium Quid: Chapters on Various Disputed Questions, Volume 1 (London: Kegan Paul, Trench & Co., 1887), link
by Edmund Gurney


Tertium Quid: Chapters on Various Disputed Questions, Volume 2 (London: Kegan Paul, Trench & Co., 1887), link
by Edmund Gurney


A later work by F. W. H. Myers.

Human Personality and Its Survival of Bodily Death, Volume 1 (London: Longman, Green, 1903), link
by Frederic William Henry Myers


Human Personality and Its Survival of Bodily Death, Volume 2 (London: Longman, Green, 1904), link
by Frederic William Henry Myers
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Old 05-12-2017, 07:12 PM
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I'm not sure what Bram Stoker's attitude toward spiritualism was. Sometimes he said to have been a member of the occult society, the Golden Dawn.

Stoker wrote a non-fiction book which describes some prominent occult figures as impostors.

Famous Imposters (London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1910), link
by Bram Stoker

In Dracula there's a passage where Van Helsing is preparing Dr. Seward to accept the existence of vampires which contains a few references to odd events.

Dracula (New York: Doubleday, 1897)
by Bram Stoker

Pages 178-180

"Can you tell me why, when other spiders die small and soon, that one great spider lived for centuries in the tower of the old Spanish church and grew and grew, till, on descending, he could drink the oil of all the church lamps?"

"We all know—-because science has vouched for the fact—-that there have been toads shut up in rocks for thousands of years, shut in one so small hole that only hold him since the youth of the world."

"Can you tell me how the Indian fakir can make himself to die and have been buried, and his grave sealed and corn sowed on it, and the corn reaped and be cut and sown and reaped and cut again, and then men come and take away the unbroken seal and that there lie the Indian fakir, not dead, but that rise up and walk amongst them as before?”

----end

The giant spider was mentioned in Notes and Queries.


Notes and Queries, July 21, 1894, Page 49

SPIDERS.—The following paragraph is copied
from the Sporting Magazine for September, 1821.
Are the statements therein pure fiction? If not,
can any one tell me how much we may safely believe?
A spider weighing four pounds is indeed
a heavy tax on the reader's credulity :—

"The sexton of the church of St. Eustace, at Paris,
amazed to find frequently a particular lamp extinct
early, and yet the oil consumed only, sat up several nights
to perceive the cause. At length he discovered that a
spider of surprising size came down the cord to drink
the oil. A still more extraordinary instance of the same
kind ocurrcd during the year 1761, in the Cathedral of
Milan. A vast spider was observed there, which fed on
the oil of the lamps. M. Morland, of the Academy of
Sciences, has described this spider, and furnished a
drawing of it. It weighed four pounds, and was sent to
the Emperor of Austria, and is now in the Imperial
Museum at Vienna."—P. 289.

ASTARTE.

----end

A link to an the magazine cited above.

Sporting Magazine, September, 1821, Page 289

An earlier version of the story.

The Monthly Magazine (London), March 1, 1814, Page 144

The sexton of the church of Saint Eustace at Paris, amazed fiequtntly to find a particular lamp extinct early, and yet the oil consumed, sat up several nights during the summer of 1732, in order to discover the cause. At length he detected a spider of surprising size, which came down the cord to drink the oil.

A still more .extraordinary instance of the sume kind, occurred during the year 1751, in the cathedral of Milano. A vast spider was observed there, which fed on the oil of the lamps. M. Morand, of the Academy of Sciences, has described this spider, and furnished a drawing of it. His words are: Le corps, couleur de suie, arrondi, terminé en pointe, avec le dos et les pattes velues, pesoit quatre livres. This spider, of four pounds weight, was sent by M. de Stainville to the Emperor of Austria, and placed in the Imperial Museum. Who has seen it? Is it not a mutilated scorpion?

----end

This seems to derive from an entry in a catalogue of manuscripts held by the Lyon library.

Manuscrits de la Bibliothèque de Lyon, Volume 1 (Paris: 1812), Pages 459-460
By A.F. DELANDINE

Celle qui porte le n.9 33 , par M. Morand, de l'Académie des sciences , rapporte deux faits singuliers. En 1732, le marguiller de l'église S. Eustache à Paris , étonné de trouver toujours la lampe éteinte et l'huile consommée , fit le guet pendant une nuit, vit UBft araignée qui descendent le long de la corde et venoît boire l'huile. Cette nourriture avoit tellement détendu les fibres et la peau de son corps, que celui-ci avoit pris un volume énorme. En 1751, on en découvrit une semblable dans le dôme de l'église de Milan, se nourrissant de l'huile des lampes, et dont le corps, couleur de suie , arrondi ,- terminé en pointe , avec le dos et les pattes velues , pesoit quatre livres. M. de Stainville l'envoya à l'empereur d'Autriche. M. Morand décrit cet insecte monstrueux , et en envoya le dessin à l'Académie.

----end

Google Translation of the above:

M. de Morand, of the Académie des Sciences, reports that there are two singular facts. In 1732, the marguiller of the church of St. Eustace in Paris, astonished at finding the lamp still alive and the oil consumed, watched over the night, saw the spider descending along the rope, and came to drink the " oil. This food had so relaxed the fibers and skin of his body, that the latter had taken an enormous volume. In 1751 a similar was discovered in the dome of the church of Milan, feeding on the oil of the lamps, and whose body, soothed, rounded, finished in a point, with the back and hairy legs , Weighed four pounds. M. de Stainville sent him to the Emperor of Austria. M. Morand describes this monstrous insect, and sent it to the Academy.

----end

There are too many stories of toads found sealed in rocks to know which one Stoker was referring to. Here's one from Birminghamr.

The Analyst, October 1835, Pages 147-149

BIRMINGHAM PHILOSOPHICAL INSTITUTION.

[...]

A paper read to the Society by Mr. Wickenden, "On the Nonpermeability of Glass by Water," is given in another part of the present number; and the last communication read to the members in this Session, was by Mr. Russell; it was "An account of a Toad, found alive, imbedded in a solid mass of new red sand-stone." As hitherto when facts of this kind have been brought before the public, they have been received with the greatest incredulity, we give the depositions of those who were present when the animal, in this instance, was discovered; and we may add that the block of sand-stone, together with the toad, may be seen at the rooms of the Philosophical Institution, in Cannon Street.

The following is a copy of the depositions:—-

During the progress of the excavation through the Park Gardens, at Coventry, on the line of the London and Birmingham Railway, at about nine o'clock in the morning of the 16th of June, 1835, the workmen were engaged in removing the material to the depth of 11 feet from the surface, the upper portion of the excavation consisting of, first, a stratum of soil, 18 inches thick; then a mixture of sand and clay, 3 feet thick; and the remaining depth of 6 1/2 feet consisting of masses of new red sand-stone, sound and perfectly formed, somewhat severed by backs and fissures, but still in large solid masses, obliged to be worked away by means of iron bars and wedges, and very frequently blasted by gun-powder.

Two of the workmen, John Horton and Thomas Tillay, having, by means of an iron-bar, loosened from the solid mass, near the bottom ot the said 11 feet, a piece of rock about 18 inches long, 15 inches broad, and 5 inches thick, it was lifted up by Horton, and thrown by him towards the waggons which Were in waiting to receive the excavated material and convey it to the embankment which was forming across the valley of the river Sherborne. The piece of rock, however, did not alight in the waggon, as was intended, but fell by the side of it, upon the bottom of the new-formed excavation, and was by the fall broken nearly through the centre into two parts, which lay upon the ground, about an inch asunder. Thomas Tillay immediately took up one of the fragments and threw it into the waggon, and was on the point of taking up th° other when his attention was arrested by the sight of a load in a cavity or cell in the face of the remaining fragment, and, instead of taking it up, he kicked it with his foot, which caused it to fall out upon the ground: he then called to his companion, and told him that he had found a toad in the stone. Horton having joined him, they examined the fracture of the other piece of rock, and found there a corresponding cavity; so that when the pieces were put together, although the stone was to all appearance perfectly solid, yet there was an oval or egg-shaped hole in the centre.

The other workmen, to the number of 30 or 40, soon collected to examine the toad. Its colour, when first seen, was a bright brown; in the space of ten minutes, however, it gradually lost its brightness, and the bright brown became almost a black. The animal seemed to labour under a severe oppression, as from heat or weight, or both combined, and gasped frequently. It was rather under the usual size; but it was plump, and apparently in good condition. During the day it remained in the possession of the men who found it, and was seen by many persons, and was often exposed to the sun and the warmth of the hand. The head appeared slightly injured, supposed to be occasioned by the breaking of the stone.

About four o'clock in the afternoon I visited the works, the toad was shewn to me, and I fitted one piece of stone upon the other, while the toad was in the recess, and found that the rock fitted closely, and observed no appearance of an opening, or fissure of any kind into the cavity, the stone on everv side appeared perfectly solid and sound. A portion of the cavity was much more rounded and smooth than the other, being, as I suppose, the lower side upon which the toad had rested. Throughout the whole cavity there was a thin black deposit, or lining; but this was more visible on that side which was more rounded, and there were evident marks where this lining was scratched off, as by the claws of the toad.

The cavity was 3 inches long and 11 inches broad: the two pieces of stone, with the toad in them, were brought to my office that evening; and I endeavoured, by closing the fracture of the stone with clay, to exclude the heat and air as much as possible, in the hopes of keeping it alive as long as I could; this I succeeded in doing for more than three days. During this time, however, it was frequently exposed, as there were many persons who were desirous of seeing it; but it seemed to be gradually wasting away: the injury in its head also became much worse, and doubtless hastened its decay: it lived, however, nearly four days from the time of its discovery.

(Signed) THOMAS L. GOOCH,

Resident Engineer to the London and Birmingham Railway Company,

Wc, the undersigned, John Horton and Thomas Tillay, declare that the above statement, so tar as regards ourselves, is true.

(Signed) JOHN HORTON, Navigator, X his mark.

(Signed) THOMAS TILLAY, Navigator, X his mark.

(Witness) BARNARD DICKENSON, Engineer.

----end
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Old 05-12-2017, 07:28 PM
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Van Helsing: "Can you tell me how the Indian fakir can make himself to die and have been buried, and his grave sealed and corn sowed on it, and the corn reaped and be cut and sown and reaped and cut again, and then men come and take away the unbroken seal and that there lie the Indian fakir, not dead, but that rise up and walk amongst them as before?”

A version of the story which says only one crop of corn was reaped.

New Views of Matter, Life, Motion and Resistance (London: E. W. Allen, 1879), Page 209
by Joseph Hands

332. Parallels to the magnetic sleep.—-1st, The Trance. The celebrated Colonel Townshend could pass into this state whenever he pleased. The Dervishes or Fakirs, were in all ages known to accomplish this feat. See the case reported by Captain Wade, who witnessed with many others the disinterment of a Fakir alive after having been buried in a recent vault which had been covered with earth for ten months, and over which had been sowed and reaped a crop of corn. I myself knew a Mr. Joyner of Berkeley, who saved his aunt from being interred. The lady was in her coffin, but knew all that was transpiring, even to hearing the bell ring out for her funeral; but it so happened that whilst her nephew was looking at the hand—-she succeeded—-aided by his touch, in moving the finger, which subsequently led to her removal from the coffin, followed afterwards by resuscitation. Miss Joyner lived many years after this occurrence. It should be here mentioned that thousands of individuals are yearly buried alive, for we have no positive test for death, save through the nose, when decomposition has set in. 2nd, The magicians, soothsayers and witches of olden times, by narcotics and other means produced a cataleptic state of body resembling death, from which when partially waking their prophetic faculties were exercised. 3rd, Chloroform produces a senseless sleep. In all these cases clairvoyance was often induced, which now and then ensues under the use of chloroform and the employment of nitrous oxid or laughing gas.

----end

An account of the burying fakir with a long footnote.

The Court and Camp of Runjeet Sing (London: Henry Colburn, 1840), Pages 123-129
by Lord William Godolphin Osborne

6th June.—The monotony of our camp life was broken this morning by the arrival of a very celebrated character in the Punjab, and a person we had all expressed great anxiety to see, and whom the Maharajah had ordered over from Umritsir on purpose.

He is a Faqueer by name, and is held in extraordinary respect by the Sihks, from his alleged capacity of being able to bury himself alive for any period of time. So many stories were current on the subject, and so many respectable individuals maintained the truth of these stories, that we all felt curious to see him. He professes to have been following this trade, if so it may be called, for some years, and a considerable time ago, several extracts from the letters of individuals who had seen the man in the upper provinces, appeared in the Calcutta papers, giving some account of his extraordinary powers, which were, at the time, naturally enough, looked upon as mere attempts at a hoax upon the inhabitants of Calcutta. Captain Wade, political agent at Loodhiana, told me that he was present at his resurrection after an interment of some months, General Ventura having buried him in the presence of the Maharajah and many of his principal Sirdars; and, as far as I can recollect, these were the particulars as witnessed by General Ventura :—-After going through a regular course of preparation, which occupied him some days, and the details of which are too disgusting to dilate upon, the Faqueer reported himself ready for interment, in a vault which had been prepared for the purpose by order of the Maharajah. On the appearance of Runjeet and his court, he proceeded to the final preparations that were necessary, in their presence, and after stopping with wax his ears, nostrils, and every other orifice through which it was possible for air to enter his body, except his mouth, he was stripped and placed in a linen bag; and the last preparation concluded by turning his tongue back, and thus, closing the gullet, he immediately died away into a sort of lethargy. The bag was then closed, and sealed with Runjeet's own seal, and afterwards placed in a small deal box, which was also locked and sealed. The box was then placed in a vault, the earth thrown in and trod down, and a crop of barley sown over the spot, and sentries placed round it. The Maharajah was, however, very sceptical on the subject, and twice in the course of the ten months he remained underground sent people to dig him up, when he was found to be in exactly the same position, and in a state of perfectly suspended animation. At the termination of the ten months, Captain Wade accompanied the Maharajah to see him disinterred, and states that he examined him personally and minutely, and was convinced that all animation was perfectly suspended. He saw the locks opened, and the seals broken by the Maharajah, and the box brought into the open air. The man was then taken out, and on feeling his wrist and heart, not the slightest pulsation was perceptible. The first thing towards restoring him to life was the forcing his tongue back to its proper position, which was done with some little difficulty by a person inserting his finger and forcibly pulling it back, and continuing to hold it until it gradually resumed its natural place. Captain Wade described the top of his head to have been considerably heated ; but all other parts of the body, cool and healthy in appearance. Pouring a quantity of warm water over him constitutes the only further measure for his restoration, and in two hours' time he is as well as ever.

He is apparently about thirty years of age, with a disagreeable and cunning expression of countenance. We had a good deal of conversation with him, and he volunteered to be interred for any length of time we pleased, in order to convince us that he is no impostor. We took him at his word, and he is to be buried on our arrival at Lahore, and to remain underground during our stay there, which will probably be three weeks or a month; and though he complains that the period is too short, and that it is hardly worth his while to undergo all the trouble of the preparation, if he comes out alive I will willingly give him credit for being able to remain a hundred years if he chooses it.

He states that his thoughts and dreams are most delightful, and that it is painful to him to be awoke from his lethargy.

His nails and hair cease growing, and on his first disinterment he is for a short time giddy and weak, but very soon recovers his natural health and spirits. His only fear whilst in his grave is that of being attacked by insects, which he obviates by having his box suspended from the ceiling.*

[Footnote:]

* On my return to Simla, accident placed in my hands the appendix to a medical topography of Loodhiania, by Dr. Mc Gregor, of the Home Artillery, by whose permission I have extracted the following account of one of the former interments and resurrections of the Faqueer:—-

"A Faqueer who arrived at Lahore engaged to bury himself for any length of time, shut up in a box, and without either food or drink. Runjeet naturally disbelieved the man's assertions, and was determined to put them to the test. For this purpose the Faqueer was shut up in a wooden box, which was placed in a small apartment below the middle of the ground; there was a folding door to his box, which was secured by a lock and key. Surrounding this apartment there was the garden house, the door of which was likewise accordingly locked, and outside the whole, a high wall, having its doorway built up with bricks and mud. In order to prevent any one from approaching the place, a line of sentries was placed, and relieved at regular intervals. The strictest watch was kept up for the space of forty days and forty nights, at the expiration of which period the Maharajah, attended by his grandson and several of his sirdars, as well as General Ventura, Captain Wade, and myself, proceeded to disinter the Faqueer. The bricks and mud were removed from the outer doorway; the door of the garden house was next unlocked, and lastly that of the wooden box, containing the Faqueer; the latter was found covered with a white sheet, on removing which, the figure of the man presented itself in a sitting posture; his hands and arms were pressed to his sides, and his legs and thighs crossed. The first step of the operation of resuscitation consisted in pouring over his head a quantity of warm water; after this, a hot cake of otta was placed on the crown of his head; a plug of wax was next removed from one of his nostrils, and on this being done, the man breathed strongly through it. The mouth was now opened, and the tongue, which had been closely applied to the roof of the mouth, brought forward, and both it and the lips anointed with ghee; during this part of the proceeding, I could not feel the pulsation of the wrist, though the temperature of the body was much above the natural standard of health. The legs and arms being extended, and the eyelids raised, the former were well rubbed, and a little ghee applied to the latter ; the eyeballs presented a dimmed, suffused appearance, like those of a corpse. The man now evinced signs of returning animation, the pulse became perceptible at the wrist, whilst the unnatural temperature of the body rapidly diminished. He made several ineffectual efforts to speak, and at length uttered a few words, but in a tone so low and feeble as to render them inaudible. By and by his speech was re-established, and he recognised some of the bystanders, and addressed the Maharajah, who was seated opposite to him, watching all his movements. When the Faqueer was able to converse, the completion of the feat was announced by the discharge of guns, and other demonstrations of joy. A rich chain of gold was placed round his neck by Runjeet, and ear-rings, baubles, and shawls were presented to him. However extraordinary this feat may appear, both to Europeans and natives, it is difficult, if not impossible, to explain it on phrenological principles. The man not only denied his having tasted food or drink, but even maintained that he had stopped the function of respiration, during a period of forty days and forty nights. To all appearance, this long fasting had not been productive of its usual effects, as the man seemed to be in rude health, so that digestion and assimilation had apparently proceeded in the usual manner; but this he likewise denied, and piously asserted, that during the whole time he had enjoyed a most delightful trance. It is well known that the natives of Hindostan, by constant practice, can bring themselves to exist on the smallest portion of food for several days, and it is equally true, that by long training, the same people are able to retain the air in their lungs for some minutes ; but how the functions of digestion and respiration could be arrested for such a length of time appears unaccountable. The concealment of the Faqueer during the performance of his feat, so far from rendering the latter more wonderful, serves but to hide the means he employs for its accomplishment, and until he can be persuaded to undergo the confinement in a place where his actions may be observed, it is needless to form any conjectures regarding them. It is well known to physiologists that the heart beats and the function of the lungs is performed, even after an animal's head has been removed; but to suppose for an instant, that the functions of the body can be performed for any length of time, without a supply of fresh arterial blood, which necessarily implies the action of respiration, is absurd, and though in cases of asphyxia, from drowning and hanging, or the inhalation of noxious gases, both circulation and respiration cease for a time; still there is a limit to this, beyond which life becomes extinct, and no power with which we are acquainted is able to recall it. My own opinion is, that the man enjoyed the functions of respiration, circulation, and assimilation, in a degree compatible with the existence of life, and that by long training he had acquired the art of retaining the air in the lungs for some minutes during the time he was being shut up, and when he was again exposed. How he managed to get a supply of food and drink I by no means wish to hazard a guess. It is said that, previous to undergoing the confinement, this man gradually overcomes the power of digestion, so that milk received into the stomach undergoes no change. He next forces all the breath in his body into the brain, which is described as thereby imparting the feeling of a hot coal to the head; the lungs now collapse, and the heart, deprived of its usual stimulus, to use a homely phrase, 'shuts up shop.' Having thus disposed of digestion, assimilation, respiration, and circulation, all the passages of the body are next stopped, the legs and thighs are crossed, the hands and arms are pressed to the sides; in short, the man presents the same appearance as when his box was opened. However childish this may all appear, the explanation was quite satisfactory to the good people of Lahore. The same individual exhibited at Jessulmere with success; an account of his feat there is given in Lieut. Boileau's work, lately published."

----end

Link to an earlier account.

The Lancet, May 13, 1837, Pages 257-259

ACCOUNT OP A MAN WHO WAS BURIED ALIVE FOR A MONTH, AND THEN EXHUMED ALIVE.

By H. M. Twedell, Esq., Bancoorah, East Indies.


Book with a section on the fakir.

Observations on Trance; or, Human Hybernation (London: John Churchill, 1850), link
By James Braid, MRCS

Another book by Braid.

Magic, Witchcraft, Animal Magnetism (London: John Churchill, 1852), link
By James Braid
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Bram Stoker wrote a novel which incorporated a version of Francis Bacon's bi-lateral cipher into it's plot about a hunt for Spanish treasure. Here's a review which gives away much of the plot:

The Saturday Review, September 6, 1902, Page 303

*The Mystery of the Sea." By Bram Stoker. London: Heinemann. 1902. 6s. It is amiable on Mr. Stoker's part to give readers their full money's worth of mysteries, but the result is that his story is rather overcrowded. First of all we have a good deal of second-sight, item a buried treasure, item an old castle with secret passages, item the Spanish-American war, item a once-aboard-the-lugger-and-she's-mine episode; finally, of all things in this and the next world, Francis Bacon's bi-literal cipher! They are dovetailed together with great ingenuity, but the promise of the supernatural in the opening chapters is not sustained, and it is a distinct anti-climax to find that an innocent fisherman is drowned at Lammas-tide in fulfilment of an old Gaelic prophecy only in order that the lover of an American young woman may find and fail to keep a treasure lost in the Spanish Armada. There is further a Hebridean witch with a very odd habit of speaking in Lowland Scotch of the Kailyard school. As for the cipher (which is apparently used by a Spaniard of the Armada to express a narrative in modern English), it is enough to make Francis Bacon turn in his grave at Stratford-on-Avon to find his system enabling a young lady who is being kidnapped through secret passages to make messages in the dust of ages with her toes. In spite of all, the first half of the story moves slowly. The supernormal is used once with real effect, when the hero by resting his hand on the dead witch's eyes can see the initial steps of a tragedy in a mist-enshrouded ship. But on the whole Mr. Stoker is hardly justified in framing such colossal machinery to produce results more simply attained by less ambitious sensationalists.

----end

Stoker's novel contains a series of appendices elaborating on the protagonist's ideas about condensing Bacon's cipher. There's a mention of yet another book about Bacon and Shakespeare.

The Mystery of the Sea: A Novel (New York: Doubleday, Page, 1902), link
by Bram Stoker


Appendix A, Pages 457-463

Page 463

"It will probably be proved hereafter that more than one variant and reduction to lower dimensions of his biliteral cipher was used between himself and his friends. When the secrets of that " Scrivenry" which, according to Mr. W. G. Thorpe in his interesting volume, "The Hidden Lives of Shakespeare and Bacon," Bacon kept at work in Twickenham Park, are made known, we shall doubtless know more on the subject."


Appendix B, Pages 464-467

ON THE REDUCTION OF THE NUMBER OF SYMBOLS IN BACON'S BILITERAL CIPHER

Appendix C, Pages 468-470

THE RESOLVING OF BACON'S BILITERAL REDUCED TO THREE SYMBOLS IN A NUMBER CIPHER

Appendix D, Pages 471-475

ON THE APPLICATION OF THE NUMBER CIPHER TO THE DOTTED PRINTING



A link to the book mentioned by Stoker.

The Hidden Lives of Shakespeare and Bacon and Their Business Connection (London: 1897), link
by William George Thorpe


Thorpe proposes that Shakespeare ran gambling "hells" for different classes of gamblers, and loaned money to Bacon because Bacon was in a position to steer work to Shakespeare's troupe of actors. Bacon also held a deer-poaching charge over Shakespeare's head. Bacon finally repaid Shakespeare, who was able to retire to Stratford-on-Avon. Bacon also ran a "scrivenry," where scribes were employed making copies of reports from spies on the continent, political tracts and the plays of Shakespeare.

Thorpe doesn't argue that Bacon wrote the plays.

Thorpe makes citations to this 7 volume documentary biography of Francis Bacon.

The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon Including All His Occasional Works, Volume 1 (London: Longman, Green, Longman and Roberts, 1861), link
by James Spedding


The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon: Including All His Occasional Works, Volume 2 (London: Longmans, Green, 1890), link
by James Spedding


The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon Including All His Occasional Works, Volume 3 (London: Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1868), link
by James Spedding


The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon Including All His Occasional Works, Volume 4 (London: Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1868), link
by James Spedding


The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon: Including All His Occasional Works, Volume 5 (London: Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1869), link
by James Spedding


The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon Including All His Occasional Works, Volume 6 (London: Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1872), link
by James Spedding


The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon: Including All His Occasional Works, Volume 7 (London: Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1874), link
by James Spedding


In volume 4, Spedding summarizes a murder case in which Bacon acted as prosecuting attorney.

Pages 289-294

It was about this time, and in the middle of some serious quarrels between the Scotch and English which the King had had much trouble in pacifying, that it became his duty to put the law in force against a Scotch nobleman who had procured the murder of an English fencing master. On the 11th of May [1612] a fencing master, named Turner, while drinking with two Scotchmen, servants of Lord Sanquhar, was shot dead by one of them. The man who fired the shot got away, but the other was taken, and being examined let out enough to raise a suspicion that their master had been an accessary. Whereupon a proclamation was immediately issued, offering large rewards for the apprehension both of the master and the man. Lord Sanquhar in the mean time, either trusting to his rank, or thinking that no evidence could be produced to connect him with the deed because his dealings had only been with the man who had escaped, gave himself up and stood upon his innocency. But he had cast up his account too soon. Another of his servants who had undertaken the deed, but lost heart and fled, was still in England, and being caught before he could get away, gave evidence which left no doubt of his master's complicity: and shortly after the actual murderer was taken in Scotland and brought up to London. After this it was useless to persist in denials, and Sanquhar confessed everything. The motive of the murder was resentment for a bodily injury inflicted by accident five years before. Turner, in fencing with Sanquhar, had unluckily put out one of his eyes. It does not appear that, at the time, any charge was made or any suspicion entertained of unfair play. But after recovering from the wound and travelling in France (where I suppose he found that the disfigurement told as a disgrace), Sanquhar returned to England with a deliberate purpose of revenge. To kill Turner with his own hand appears to have been his first intention; but having sought in vain for an opportunity to do it himself without risk of detection, he accepted the offer of two of his countrymen who undertook to do it for him; and in the mean time took the precaution, for his own safety, of crossing the Channel again, and waiting to hear what happened. Finding after a while that his friends had failed him, he returned again to England, and resorted to his servants; two of whom jointly undertook the work. And when again one of these thought better and fled, the other offered to do it alone. And so at last it was done.

It would be difficult to imagine a case of a murder more deliberate or more cowardly, or in which the privilege of anger and hot blood could be pleaded with less justice. How it can be supposed that he believed himself to be acting in accordance with the laws of honour, even as interpreted in that duelling age by courts of honour, I cannot understand. At any rate the "honour" which required or allowed the deliberate murder in cold blood, behind the back, and by another man's hand, of one who had meant to do no injury, was a kind of honour with which King James had no sympathy; and though Sanquhar was a Scotchman and a nobleman, and likely enough to find sympathizers among his countrymen after the fact, as he had found accomplices before, he was at once handed over to the King's Bench as a man charged with procuring murder. He was indicted on the 27th of June, pleaded guilty, and made a full confession. After which, according to the practice in such cases, and before the passing of sentence, something was said by the counsel for the prosecution [Bacon] as to the nature of the case. [...]

----end
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