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  #591  
Old 12-14-2016, 06:35 AM
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caz caz is offline
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Originally Posted by Sherlock View Post
I accept that to include flashbacks of Christie's earlier life it would have been necessary to present the story in a different way. One possible flashback might have been of Christie viewing his grandfather's body in his coffin as a young boy, which apparently fuelled his fascination with corpses and may have had an influence on his development as a murderer.
Hi Sherlock,

I suppose it depends on the source for your 'apparently'. If it was Christie himself who blamed this boyhood incident for his morbid fascination as an adult, I wouldn't trust it for a moment. And who else could say that one had had a bearing on the other?

Many children of that era - and beyond - would have had similar experiences without any lasting ill effects, never mind developing criminal tendencies as a result. Even when my daughter started school in 1992, not yet five years old, her teacher showed the class a photo of somebody's "grandma and grandad" in their coffins to get the children used to the idea of death! Luckily I had already had that discussion with her so she took it in her stride. Later, in her next school, the teacher unaccountably decided to give the girls a sex education lesson by showing them a film of horses mating. You wouldn't give it credence, would you? But again, luckily, I had already had that discussion with my daughter, so she took that in her stride too.

Love,

Caz
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Last edited by caz : 12-14-2016 at 06:38 AM.
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  #592  
Old 12-14-2016, 06:42 AM
spyglass spyglass is offline
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Hi,
The fact that the Police messed up big time.
If they had searched the garden properly in the first place.
The drama didn't show this whole debacle of the case.

Regards
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  #593  
Old 12-14-2016, 09:43 AM
Sherlock Sherlock is offline
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Hi Caz


Yes, as far as I am aware we only have Christie's own word about seeing his grandfather in his coffin. If I remember correctly he told that to one of the psychiatrists who examined him before the trial. Apparently he enjoyed playing in the cemetery at All Souls church near his home in Chester Road, Halifax after this. Ludovic Kennedy stated in his book that one of Christie's friends noticed that he seemed to be particularly fascinated by a number of children's coffins which could be seen through a broken slab which covered a grave.

Interestingly, two other murderers are believed to have had similar experiences. Dennis Neilson apparently envied the peace and serenity which seemed to surround the body of his grandfather after it had been brought home following his death on a fishing boat, and I think Harold Shipman had similar feelings after seeing his mother's body after her death from cancer. However, I accept that in both of these cases, as with Christie, it would be very difficult to determine if this was indeed a factor which influenced them in committing murders.

One of the psychiatrists who gave evidence at Christie's trial, although I forget which one, possibly J.A. Hobson who gave evidence for the defence, stated that he felt that Christie enjoyed living in close proximity to the corpses he had concealed in his house. I shall have to check up on this.

Last edited by Sherlock : 12-14-2016 at 10:07 AM.
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  #594  
Old 12-14-2016, 09:50 AM
Sherlock Sherlock is offline
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I think Christie also mentioned seeing his dead grandfather in his memoirs which were published in the Sunday Pictorial with the help of journalist Harry Procter, but of course we have no way of knowing how much of what he said was true.

Incidentally, I believe this newspaper paid for Christie's defence team at his trial in return for his memoirs. He was defended by Derek Curtis-Bennett QC.
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  #595  
Old 12-26-2016, 10:29 AM
contrafib contrafib is offline
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Hello friends, Merry Xmas to all.
I have now belatedly watched the BBC Rillington Place drama and have a few observations to share. I think we’ve already covered the differences in details between this and what we know to be true in terms of dates and switching of the identities of certain people, and I’m going to refrain from calling them ‘errors’, as the makers clearly knew most or all of them. I concur with Honest John that an opportunity was missed, and I will address the validity of ‘drama based on real events’ in my conclusion.
I feel that Tim Roth did a good characterisation of Christie, with his physical stoop and overall air of weakness and sickliness, and his quite subtle but noticeable shortness of breath was effective. Samantha Morton also gave a good performance, at first appearing too attractive for Ethel but getting progressively plumper and dowdier as the years went on. This is important because whether or not Ethel was naive, she would surely have suspected something over such a long period with Reg, and her lack of sexual market value would be a plausible explanation for her staying with him. Their relationship was believable, and in a drama the makers are forgiven some license and use of dramatic tropes, such as her covering for Reg in the case of Muriel Eady’s coat and her moral quandary. However, the choking scene was pretty unnecessary and the same idea could have been conveyed in a more subtle way.
The gloominess of Rillington Place was effectively conveyed, with the use of smoke, grime and the lack of people around adding to the sense of isolation and a genuinely sad life. I was surprised how oversized the Christies’ front room was, as was the Evans’ front room and indeed the courtroom. In the case of the rooms in the house, I suppose this was done for filming purposes but was clearly inaccurate. As for Evans, I felt that John Hurt’s portrayal of an excitable young drunk in the first film was more effective than the one here. There was much use of dramatic license in the trial scene, and I would have liked to have seen Christie breaking down to cry as he did in reality, because it would have made it less cut and dried (see conclusion for more comment on this) and offered more ambiguity as undoubtedly existed.
The episode from Reg’s point of view was interesting, and I was pleased to see that his killing of his wife was not melodramatic, as I feared that some kind of domestic scene would play out where she threatened to shop him to the police and he slowly tightened the noose around her neck. Instead, it was quick, brutal and messy, as I believe it probably was in reality.
In conclusion, I wanted to address the unsatisfactory ending. As mentioned above, I forgive the filmmakers their artistic license for the sake of drama and also the tropes of making characters and certain scenes more clear-cut and less ambiguous. However, I must ask why there was no explanation at all offered for Christie’s crimes if this is the case. He was interviewed by psychiatrists, and we know certain things about his childhood, so as others have mentioned why not at least attempt to explain a few things to at least offer some lessons from this otherwise sordid and sorry tale? It’s also worth pondering whether real events should be used for drama for any reason other than to draw in viewers. I don’t have a definitive answer on this but I’d definitely be interested in others’ opinions.
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  #596  
Old 12-26-2016, 09:38 PM
Semper_Eadem Semper_Eadem is offline
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I think the reason no explanation was offered for why Christie did what he did was because there was really no explanation offered in Christie's real life. Not Really! Sure people have theories but that is all they are theories and as for anything Christie said well I would take that with a grain of salt.
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  #597  
Old 01-01-2017, 03:30 PM
John Wheat John Wheat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Semper_Eadem View Post
I think the reason no explanation was offered for why Christie did what he did was because there was really no explanation offered in Christie's real life. Not Really! Sure people have theories but that is all they are theories and as for anything Christie said well I would take that with a grain of salt.
I think we've got to bare in mind Christie was a perverted necrophiliac serial killer.
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  #598  
Old 01-01-2017, 04:52 PM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Semper_Eadem View Post
...as for anything Christie said well I would take that with a grain of salt.
"Or NaCl₂ as we call it"

(oblique reference to the Attenborough film)
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  #599  
Old 03-07-2017, 10:27 AM
Writerboy Writerboy is offline
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I've recently seen the first television drama to cover the Christie case, The Dreams of Tim Evans (ITV 1970).

This late-night half-hour was a sort of acorn from which grew the 1971 Richard Attenborough film (same writer), and as I've recently seen it, some may be interested to know a little more about it:

https://dreamsgatheringdust.wordpres...017/03/07/192/
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  #600  
Old 03-07-2017, 03:31 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Writerboy View Post
I've recently seen the first television drama to cover the Christie case, The Dreams of Tim Evans (ITV 1970).

This late-night half-hour was a sort of acorn from which grew the 1971 Richard Attenborough film (same writer), and as I've recently seen it, some may be interested to know a little more about it:

https://dreamsgatheringdust.wordpres...017/03/07/192/
Very informative, as I know next to nothing about the murders or the films about it. Thank you for sharing the link, Writerboy.
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