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Go Back   Casebook Forums > Ripper Discussions > Suspects > Tumblety, Francis

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  #51  
Old 02-21-2017, 10:46 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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I can't help thinking that Dr. Tumblety was a LVP version of a "reality celebrity" -- someone who is famous merely for being famous, and to whose escapades the newspapers willingly gave space, because they "sold papers".
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  #52  
Old 02-22-2017, 01:00 AM
Mayerling Mayerling is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert View Post
From Joe:


The Pittsburgh Daily Commercial

April 28, 1871

Page 4







MAYOR BRUSH gave Frank Tumblety six months for vagrancy.










From Joe: Dr. Tumblety was in the New York City area when those two articles were printed. The Pittsburgh vagrant was some other guy named Tumblety. On another matter, you may recall when Dr. Tumblety was falsely arrested in New Orleans in 1881. The details of that story came from the New Orleans Picayune newspaper. Well, four additional articles on the case have now been found, but this time the details are provided by the New Orleans Times Democrat. That newspaper went a little further in depth into the story. We'll try to have those four articles posted on this thread in the upcoming days. Thank you to Robert, Scott, David, and Mike for all your help. Ok, here is one last article for today:







Cleveland Daily Leader

November 18, 1861

Page 4




Dr. TUMBLETY REDIVIVUS. The Buffalo Courier has it from good authority that the original Dr. Tumblety is flourishing about Washington with the original dog, as large as life and a good deal more natural. Also, that he has been attached to Gen McClellan's Staff as a Surgeon.




The first part of the story is correct, and the last is perhaps a good joke. The Dr., dressed in a sort of half military suit, with his great hound behind him, gallops up Pennsylvania avenue in a style that causes half the people in town who don't know better to mistake him for one of the foreign Princes. The Dr. is a living illustration of what small means, joined in faith, can accomplish.


An interesting point on this matter from "Wikipedia". The "Mayor Brush" of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is Mayor Jared Brush (1814 - 1895). He was, during the American Civil War, a member of the United States Sanitary Commission (established in 1861) that monitored and tried to take care of the soldiers camps and hospitals in the Union forces. Among those who served in it were Samuel Howe (husband of Julia Ward Howe), George Templeton Strong (of the New York State section - he is a well remembered diarist, and in the Ken Burns' series for television "The Civil War" the author George Plimpton read entries from his diary regarding the war effort), Louisa May Alcott (who served it as a nurse for the wounded soldiers), and Mary "Mother" Bickersdyke and Mary Livermore, both of whom (like Clara Barton) did yeoman service taking care of the soldiers on the fronts as the heads of the nurses (Bickersdyke serving under General William Tecumseh Sherman, who admired her greatly). I bring this up because it might mean that Jared Brush had some acquaintance with Doc Tumblety in 1861 - 1863 in Washington.

Jeff
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  #53  
Old 02-22-2017, 10:58 AM
David Orsam David Orsam is offline
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From Joe:* Much of this article was difficult to transcribe.* I placed words in brackets that I'm guessing*were the same as the words that were printed in the newspaper.


New Orleans Times Democrat
Wednesday March 30, 1881
Page 3


THE TUMBLETY CASE

(Irresponsible) and Unauthorized Parties
(to) Arrest and Imprison Persons Against
Whom There is no Evidence (to) Base
an Accusation.

The case of Dr. Francis Tumblety (charged) with petty larceny, was called yesterday morning in the Second Recorder's Court.* Mr. De Fonblanque appeared for the defense, and Mssrs Dart and Guthelm for the prosecution.

Mr. Henry Govan, the prosecuting witness, was first placed on the stand.

He said:* I first saw Dr. Tumblety at 10 o'clock at night on Canal street, between (?) and Bourbon streets.* He commenced a conversation by speaking about (a) matter, and then asked me to take a (drink).* He also invited me to visit him at (his) room.* When he left me that night he made an appointment to meet me at (Wenger's?) Garden the following night.* I failed to keep the appointment.* The next day I (met) Dr. Tumblety at the corner of Customhouse and Decatur streets, and he placed his right hand on my left shoulder and asked me why I didn't keep my appointment.* I made some excuse and went (away).* My pocketbook was in the (outside) pocket of the coat...When I went to Dr. Tumblety's room the next day in company with (O'Malley) the doctor seemed delighted to see us, and asked if I had brought a friend with me.* I demanded my pocketbook, (and) he denied all knowledge of it, (professing) his innocence.* There was about (seventy) dollars in my pocketbook.

D. C. O'Malley next took the stand and said:* At 12 o'clock Wednesday, Mr. R. (Stewart) informed me that Mr. Govan wanted to see me, and I called on him in (his) office.* Mr. Govan told me that he had (lost) a pocketbook with sixty or seventy dollars in it.* He also said that Captain (Malone) had told him to call the first policeman and have the man he suspected (arrested).* I then agreed to take the case, (and) together we went and looked for the (man) whom he suspected.* From a (bartender) we obtained a description of Dr. Tumblety, and we went to Mrs. Field's (house) on Canal street.

(The) door was opened and when we entered the doctor sent a young man who (was) in the room to go to the post office.* (Mr.) Govan then asked for his pocketbook (which) the doctor denied having taken.* I (then) placed the doctor under arrest, and (when) we were in the hall the doctor said:* "(You) will ruin me to go to jail, and if this young man has lost his pocketbook I will (give) him sixty or seventy dollars."* Mr. Govan, however, refused to compromise (in this) case, saying that he would put the doctor in a place where he would not be (able) to victimize other young men.

On the way to the station the doctor said, "You will find the young man's money on my bureau."* I told this to the (judge) before I obtained the search warrant.

(When) cross examined by Mr. De Fonblanque -- Is it true that you have incurred the (displeasure) of the law?* Yes, sir; I have been (accosted) about eight times by Mr. Boylan's police through prejudice.* I was (convicted) in Cleveland, Ohio, for buying (stolen) property, and fined twenty dollars.**I saw suspicious looking tools in the doctor's room.* I would know the young (man) whom I saw in Tumblety's room.* (Another) witness identified a Mr. McMurry as (the) man.* I did not see the doctor take the money, which I found on the bureau, (and) in*the pocket of the pants which he was repairing when we entered.

In answer to a question from the judge: *I thought Tumblety's actions (were) very strange because he recognized Mr. Govan when we entered, and then afterward pretended not to have met him before.* Mr. Govan was absent during most of our conversation, but he was absent for about fifteen minutes looking for a policeman, it was (then) that Tumblety used a number of slang expressions, generally used by thieves.

...Ross Stewart, the next witness, said:* I saw Tumblety and Govan together on Wednesday last at the corner of Decatur and Customhouse street.* They were facing (each) other, and were very close together.* (I was) passing at the time and saw that (the) doctor had his hand in an elevated (position), but cannot say that he had it on Govan's shoulder.

(Mr.) Dupart, barkeeper, corner of (Dau??) and Canal said:* "I saw the accused (and) Mr. Govan together on Monday week, (they) took two drinks.* Dr. Tumblety said (he) had no use for gamblers and shook (hands) with me;* Mr. Govan laughed at the remark.

Officer Lannagan, said:* I saw Govan Wednesday last; he met me...and complained that he had been robbed of his pocketbook.* I advised him to (seek) the first policeman and have the suspected party arrested.* O'Malley was (present) and asked some questions.

(During) the evening Govan called on me (and) said he had his man and wanted me to arrest him.* I then went to Mrs. Field's (house) where I met O'Malley, who told me (that he) was a special officer, and asked (me to watch) the room as he suspected that it (contained) burglar's tools, but I declined, as (I did) not want to see the thing bungled up.* (On our) way to the station the doctor told (me that) he had forty-five on his bureau in (his room) which he wanted me to go and (retrieve but I) declined, until I could consult (with my sergeant.)

(That) concluded the case, and Judge Miltenberger discharged the accused, saying (that) the complainant had failed to (substantiate?) any facts which would tend to (show) that the accused was guilty.

...Dr. Tumblety was then discharged, and (left) the court looking exceedingly happy.
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  #54  
Old 02-22-2017, 11:00 AM
David Orsam David Orsam is offline
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More from Joe:


The Leavenworth Times
Leavenworth, Kansas
May 25, 1881
Page 2

The "New York Times" Libel Suit.


Dr. F. Tumblety, who was arrested at New Orleans on the false charge of picking the pocket of an acquaintance on the street, and received an honorable discharge, has sued The New York Times for publishing a telegram on the subject and refusing to retract.


Philadelphia Times
December 8, 1888
Page 4

WHERE IS TUMBLETY.

He is Believed to be in Cincinnati En Route to Chicago.


Chicago, December 7.* Dr. Tumblety who was gaining an unenviable notoriety by reason of a fancied connection with the Whitechapel murders, was expected to arrive in Chicago this morning on the Pennsylvania limited.* He failed to appear, however, and a conversation with the Pullman conductor developed the fact that a man whose description answers to that of the physician with the odd name, rode from New York to Pittsburg, but was transferred to the sleeper which went down to Cincinnati.

The doctor in all possibility, however, may have changed his plans at the last moment and arrived here by another road.* It is not improbable that if Tumblety isn't already in Chicago he will soon drift around here, as he is known to have friends in this city with whom he could stay until the present excitement in connection with his name blows over.
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  #55  
Old 02-22-2017, 01:05 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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I have a question about O'Malley, who is described in an earlier article as a "commissioned special officer", yet seems to admit during his testimony that he has been charged with illegal acts.

Would he qualify as what we call today a "private detective", do you think? Who commissioned him, anyway?
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  #56  
Old 03-02-2017, 02:43 PM
Robert Robert is online now
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From Joe: According to Tim Riordan's book, Dominick O'Malley often got himself into trouble.




"Most of what is known about O'Malley comes from later in his life. He was described in 1891 as having served a ten-month sentence in the Workhouse and having been in court nine times for carrying a concealed weapon, jury tampering and witness intimidation...The O'Malley Detective Agency was widely reported to be in the service of the Mafia."
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  #57  
Old 03-03-2017, 12:19 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert View Post
From Joe: According to Tim Riordan's book, Dominick O'Malley often got himself into trouble.




"Most of what is known about O'Malley comes from later in his life. He was described in 1891 as having served a ten-month sentence in the Workhouse and having been in court nine times for carrying a concealed weapon, jury tampering and witness intimidation...The O'Malley Detective Agency was widely reported to be in the service of the Mafia."
Thanks, Robert. Interesting fellow. No wonder cops looked down on private detectives!
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