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  #11  
Old 08-20-2017, 07:23 AM
c.d. c.d. is offline
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I don't understand Cockney rhyming slang. Can an individual make it up himself on the spot or does it have to be agreed upon beforehand by a number of people?

c.d.
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  #12  
Old 08-20-2017, 07:56 AM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c.d. View Post
I don't understand Cockney rhyming slang. Can an individual make it up himself on the spot or does it have to be agreed upon beforehand by a number of people?
Each one must have started life as the invention of an individual but, if sufficiently memorable, it would catch on and eventually become part of the canon of slang expressions. Although some Cockney rhyming slang terms go way back to the early Victorian era, others are being added to the lexicon all the time. Recent examples might be "Ruby Murray = curry", "Vera Lynn = gin", "Barney Rubble = trouble", and "Pete Tong = wrong" (e.g. "it's all gone a bit Pete Tong").
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  #13  
Old 08-20-2017, 09:16 AM
c.d. c.d. is offline
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Hello Sam,

Thanks for that explanation. It seems rather odd and quite complicated to us Yanks but then again we here across the pond are a simple people.

c.d.
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  #14  
Old 08-20-2017, 01:09 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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Default It's all in the ear of the listener

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Originally Posted by c.d. View Post
Good link. I think "tosser" is about the equivalent of our "jerk" (which is a milder version of the original "jerkoff").

I remember when the British sci-fi comedy "Red Dwarf" came over here, American fans equated "snog" with "smeg", until the warning went out that the latter word was much dirtier in meaning.
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  #15  
Old 08-20-2017, 01:27 PM
GUT GUT is offline
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I was told once that TWIT was an acronym for That's What I Thought, ie too dumb to know the real truth.

Now maybe I'm a twit for not knowing if that's true or not, but I always thought it was a good story.

They also used to say a twit was a pregnant goldfish and as goldfish don't get pregnant (they lay eggs) a twit doesn't excuse, not does a twit's intelligence.
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  #16  
Old 08-20-2017, 01:44 PM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is online now
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I was told once that TWIT was an acronym for That's What I Thought
I just checked in the full Oxford English Dictionary, and it doesn't offer any origin for the word at all.

While I was there, I looked up "twat" as well. It, too, is of unknown or uncertain etymology, but I had heard at school that "twat" was another word for a nun's head-gear. This is actually mentioned in the OED, but only to say that it's incorrect; the entry in the OED shows that the original quote (from 1660) was clearly using the "rude" definition, but Browning (whoever he was) evidently took it to mean "nun's head-gear" due to the mention, in the same verse, of a cardinal's hat:
Erroneously used by Browning in 1727... under the impression that it denoted some part of a nun's attire. Vanity of Vanities, 1660: "They talk't of his having a Cardinall's Hat / But they'd send him as soon an Old Nun's Twat"
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  #17  
Old 08-20-2017, 02:44 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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I'm so sure about "twat" meaning a nun's headgear (also called a wimple), because "an old nun's twat" fits well with nun meaning prostitute.
See also Shakespeare's "get thee to a nunnery" in which he may be referring to a brothel, not a convent.
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  #18  
Old 08-20-2017, 03:50 PM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pcdunn View Post
I'm so sure about "twat" meaning a nun's headgear (also called a wimple), because "an old nun's twat" fits well with nun meaning prostitute.
Indeed, it doesn't mean a nun's headgear, but that was the urban myth - started by Browning in 1727, I guess - which was still circulating when I were a lad.
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  #19  
Old 08-20-2017, 05:51 PM
Abby Normal Abby Normal is offline
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Someone once called me a vile wanker on here. LOL! Greatest insult ever. And it rolls off the tongue like honey. Vile wanker. Love it!
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  #20  
Old 08-21-2017, 02:55 PM
johns johns is offline
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Bellend...

Used almost every day at my work to describe someone
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