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  #91  
Old 10-18-2017, 02:01 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry D View Post
A shame that a talented poet's legacy has become that of a half-baked Ripper suspect.
Agreed! I was horrified when I first read of Mr. Patterson's theory here. I still think it is not as clear as he believes it is, but I did find that recent biographies of Thompson are not out there.
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Von Konigswald: Jack the Ripper plays shuffleboard. -- Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, c.1970.
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  #92  
Old 10-18-2017, 05:01 PM
Richard Patterson Richard Patterson is offline
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Originally Posted by Trevor Marriott View Post
I have one observation with regards to this article. Thompson is described as a derelict, a drug addict. If that be correct then his dress, and demeanour would also fit with the description of him.

I have to ask would a prostitute even of the lower class even proposition such a person? and if they did, and that person was interested, it would be "show me the money first", which a derelict and drug addict would surely not be able to do.

www.trevormarriott.co.uk
Hi Trevor,

You bring up a good point and a common objection to the theory. Although it is true that Thompson spent most of his homeless years dressed in rags and would seem to have failed to attract the attention of a prostitute, he did somehow manage to befriend one and spend a year-long relationship with her. (from the spring of 1887 to the spring of 1888)

The editor of the Catholic magazine the 'Merry England' Wilfrid Meynell received Thompson’s first poems and rescued him from poverty in June of 1888. Meynell paid Thompson for his submissions. Meynell also welcomed him into his home, and had Thompson fed, bathed and bought him a new suit and coat.

By the end of August 1888, Thompson was still homeless, because he refused to leave the streets, so fixated was he in finding his prostitute who had left him. This was despite his editor offering to find him permanent lodgings.

Thanks to his editor's charity, Thompson was clean, fed, and well dressed. This all happened on the eve of the Ripper murders. By the end of August 1888 an articulate Thompson was off laudanum, urged by his editor, and, dressed to impress with money in his pockets.
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  #93  
Old 10-18-2017, 05:03 PM
Richard Patterson Richard Patterson is offline
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Originally Posted by Varqm View Post
Somehow he managed to appear like a sailor and a shabby genteel.

Can somebody go in and out at Providence row at all times in 1888?
Providence Row may have been unique as a shelter for having the policy of not locking residents in at night and therefore allowing them to leave at all hours. This may have been because the Row encouraged its inmates to find work and many professionals seeking employment used this shelter as a home while they looked for work, including professions such as lamplighters, matchbox sellers or those who worked in the markets; those who, necessarily, worked odd hours. If the Ripper slept at a refuge, this policy would have made Providence Row perfectly suited to his nightly forays.
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  #94  
Old 10-18-2017, 05:06 PM
Richard Patterson Richard Patterson is offline
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Originally Posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
The link, after the extract you posted, goes on to say;

"t must be distinctly understood however that the poor applicant is not kept waiting for relief, but is lodged and fed, whilst the investigation is proceeding."
You are correct Joshua. Once the refugee received a reference from an applicant, they allowed the applicant to stay for four days in the Row while their references where checked. If the reference turned out to be false or came back as negative, the applicant was asked to leave. I doub't that Thompson would have risked giving a reference that was not valid or commendable or he would have been turned out and he would have risked further attempts to gain entry.
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  #95  
Old 10-18-2017, 05:31 PM
Richard Patterson Richard Patterson is offline
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Default Some reviews of my book and the theory.

I see that a few members find, that I would write that a famous poet was Jack the Ripper, disgraceful. I know I have detractors here on Casebook. If I may, here are what readers beyond casebook, have to say about it.

Vivienne Spaltman (the Great Great Grandniece of my suspect, Francis Thompson, gave my book five stars. I spoke with her over the phone and she said that the idea that Thompson might be the Ripper had long been a rumour in the family. Vivienne had this to say about my book.

Most enjoyable read, very well researched content which leaves no doubt in my mind that Francis Thompson was certainly a person of interest that slipped through the net of suspects. The poetry of Francis Thompson seem to be a true account of his actions and explained in Richard Patterson's book along with facts that are known about this poet which Richard researched and used in his book.



Goodreads. 5 stars.
Well-written, documentary-toned page turner.
By Vivian D. Sober on 21 Sep. 2017

In Jack the Ripper, The Works of Francis Thompson, Richard Patterson, writes about the notorious serial killer, Jack the Ripper (The Ripper). The Ripper is the subject of many books. However, this author and Joseph C. Rupp, the forensic pathologist who wrote the Forward, believe Francis Thompson, a posthumous, genius and renowned poet is actually The Ripper. Richard Patterson thoroughly explains his allegations.

In 1888, the Ripper tips off the police in poetic letters. He methodically killed five women—prostitutes from penniless backgrounds—using a sharp knife effortlessly like someone familiar with the human anatomy. He withdraws into the night becoming an unknown, worldwide celebrity. When people are panic-stricken, Francis Joseph Thompson (Francis) makes his writing debut. This poet passionately uses Biblical verses, and many of his poems are bloody and about prostitutes.

By paralleling the Ripper’s actions with Francis’ life, you find: a Catholic man with a painful childhood who attended medical school for six years, hated women, kept company with prostitutes, was addicted to drugs, and tasted homelessness.

Patterson compares the mind and actions of several serial killers to Francis’ personality. It is very clear that serial killers do not stand out in society, and, if Francis were on trial today, the Ripper’s identity would probably have a face.

Jack the Ripper, The Works of Francis Thompson, is a 404 page, well-written, documentary-toned page turner.


Goodreads. 5 stars.
Patterson presents a stunning case...
By writer and editor Rebecca Henderson on Aug 31. 2017.

Serial killers continue to haunt the collective minds of society, as is apparent by the number and popularity of criminal-focused T.V. shows on the air today. What pushes a man—or woman—to the brink of sanity and causes them to kill others? The jury may still be out on just what causes such feelings and spurs violence in this manner, but one thing is certain: by learning more about the human mind, and our own selves, we can better understand—and more importantly, hypothesize a solution for—continued killings. If we can comprehend what factors lead to this mania, appropriate countermeasures can be put in place to prevent further catastrophes.

Jack the Ripper, the moniker attached to five brutal murders during the late 1800s, has earned his place among other famous serial killers in the pages of history. In his new book, Jack the Ripper: The Works of Francis Thompson, Richard Patterson delves deep into the annals of history to unearth the truth about Francis Thompson—and what dastardly and not-so-distant connection he may have to the Ripper himself.

Patterson presents a stunning case of connections, facts, and irrefutable conclusions. In a time before forensics and many of the scientific measures that have proved invaluable in more recent cases, seemingly coincidental happenstances and supportable knowledge comprise the only reliable information available. Patterson does a fantastic job of gathering the evidence and presenting it in a logical manner. By the end of the first few chapters, his case is strong. Thompson’s guilt only builds as Patterson continues to lay out the facts.

Readers will soon find themselves agreeing with Patterson’s conclusion that Francis Thompson is, if not Jack the Ripper himself, a very strong candidate. Thompson had the medical knowledge required to perform the intricate and detailed procedures upon the victims, as he was a voracious reader and attended medical schooling for quite some time. Clues to events regarding the murders can be found among his writings. In an opium-induced haze, Thompson could potentially be capable of any number of things. He was living in the area at the time of the murders. And if reports are to be believed, Thompson, spurned by his lady-of-the-night lover, would have had a motive for the killings.

Patterson skilfully magnifies and expounds upon the life of Francis Thompson, so much so that readers, for all that Thompson may or may not have done, cannot help but sympathize. Thompson was an accomplished writer, albeit one under the influence of drugs. His poems and writings are somewhat disturbing at times, but the incredible descriptions and tangible feelings infused in each work evokes a sense of respect. For all his faults, Thompson had talent. It is heartbreaking to know that he wasted away in the streets, rather than live well.

I strongly recommend Jack the Ripper: The Works of Francis Thompson for any reader. Obviously, the subject requires a certain maturity, but even readers who don’t usually delve into historical or non-fiction works will be entertained. The prose is easy to follow, and no prior knowledge of Jack the Ripper is necessary. Patterson presents his case well, and follows a logical process in order to relay the facts and draw connections. The next time you’re craving a taste of the fanatical, pick up Richard Patterson’s Jack the Ripper!


Goodreads. 5 stars
Beautifully Written...
By Sarah on 3 Aug. 2017

This thoroughly researched, intricate and immensely captivating book unravels the mystery of Jack the Ripper. The writing is truly immersive while simultaneously presents compelling evidence of Francis Thompson's guilt. The years of work put into this by Richard Patterson are clear and have resulted in the compilation of a wonderful book for those passionate about the Jack the Ripper murders as well as those who are simply interested in reading a piece of work that is beautifully written and well argued.

Amazon Books Australia. 5 stars
The research is amazing...
By Peter Anstee on 9 Aug. 2017.

This is a challenging read but one whose journey is worth it. The style of writing mirrors both the poets turn of phrase and the ambiguity inherent in Victorian literature a device that is well employed by Richard Patterson. The research is amazing and not just tied in to the evidence of Francis Thompson being a ripper candidate but to a setting and location in time. The very smells and echoes of London in 1888 permeate this volume. An original conceit that is explored in such a depth that even the most ardent of sceptic will be seduced into thinking that yes the mystery is solved. If this book does not go down as a worthy addition to the ripper canon then like the crime itself it is a scandal. Richard Patterson has established himself as a serious contender with this tome and adds to an impressive array of literature -one in which he can hold his head high as he has not just added but heightened the theories and possibilities surrounding a phenomena that continues to engage and question us and our perceptions. If you had the slightest interest in Jack the ripper then this book needs to be on your shelf and in your consciousness.

Amazon Books UK. 5 stars
A JTR book like no other
By XRNOHPORTER on 5 Mar. 2017.

Just finished. I must say first off, this is a JTR book like no other. Richard has not followed the usual format of chapters devoted to re-telling the same old stuff about the dreadful conditions in the East End, the almost impossible task facing the Police, the sad lives of the victims, he doesn't even go into detail about the crime scenes.

Acting on the wise assumption that his target readership will already know those details, he launches straight into the life Francis Thompson and the evidence he has build up to prove his case.

(I found this very refreshing as I always skip past the 'rehash' chapters in any new book)

He lifts Thompson off the page and draws you into his world and mindset. As you progress through the book and the evidence piles up, you wonder if you have wasted time with all those other suspects who have almost no evidence against them. Certainly not as much as this !...

He shows you Thompson's life, beliefs, writings, and circumstances and says, now examine this when at the same time a killer was stalking the East End....
I will not go into great detail so as not to spoil it for others but I will just say this....... I am one of those who hopes the mystery will never be solved but......after reading this.....I am biting my lip VERY hard and thinking Richard may have cracked it.

It is a great book Richard, a true 'must read'.
I look forward to your next book.


Amazon Books UK. 5 stars
A fascinating and informative read
By Steve Jessup on 7 Mar. 2017.

... The author concentrates mainly on Thompson and why he (the author) believes Francis Thompson to be a very viable candidate for the mantle of Jack The Ripper.. ... The reader is given the authors reasoning as to why his suspect may be the murder but the decision as to Thompson's guilt is left to the reader. A fascinating and informative read and must be recommended to those who already have a working knowledge of the case.

Amazon Books UK 5 Stars
A great read...
By Gordon Stoker on 11 April 2017.

... It's a breath of fresh air to read about plausible suspects who were there on those streets at the time and none are more plausible than Francis Thompson. This is a very convincing book based on Thompson's own words, Richard Patterson has a very easy writing style that propels you through the dark and disturbing world view that Thompson had and his followers tried to cover up. Instead of dwelling on the individual murders for at least a quarter of the book like most other "ripper" books do this work goes straight into why Thompson is an incredibly likely suspect for the most infamous murderer in history. A great read and I highly recommend it.


Amazon Books UK 5 Stars
Intriguing
By Gabriele Urban on 21 April 2017.

This is an excellent book. Well written and very informative about, not only Thompson, the poet, but also about life in London at the time. The author has left no stone unturned and has the ability to transport you to where ever he needs you to be. Highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the Ripper murders.

Amazon Books UK 5 Stars
Compelling theory
By Amazon Customer on 21 April 2017.

I saw the author's presentation on his theories at the 'Jack the ripper convention last year, so I was eagerly waiting to read this book. It certainly didn't disappoint and I read it in two sittings. For any JTR enthusiasts this book is a must have for your collection...

Amazon Books UK 5 Stars
A compelling case for the prosecution.
By Sashadooon 29 April 2017.

Richard Patterson has gone where few have gone before him in presenting a reasonably damning case that leans towards naming famed Victorian poet, Francis Thompson as a credible suspect in the case of Jack the Ripper. I say 'leans towards' because the author very cleverly makes the point that he leaves any such conclusion to the reader, even though we know he is pointing the finger directly at the poet.

It's obvious to the reader that Mr. Patterson has indulged in extensive research in producing his book, which at all times presents a vivid insight into life among both the 'haves' and the 'have nots' in the often grand but sometimes stinking metropolis that was Victorian London. The sights, the sounds and the voices he describes are almost tangible in their reality. Having studied the Ripper case for over forty years I now find myself with another credible suspect to consider. Although Mr. Patterson holds back from actually saying 'Francis Thompson WAS Jack the Ripper', I must admit, the evidence as presented in this book is truly compelling. A veritable must read for serious students of the Ripper murders. Highly recommended.


Amazon Books UK 5 Stars
A compelling argument for Francis Thompson as the killer...
By Crime Traveller Book Reviews on 4 May 2017.

Extensively researched, Richard Patterson's book Jack The Ripper: The Works of Francis Thompson takes you through the life of Francis Thompson but it is far from a dry account of his life. It is a fascinating insight into the early beginnings of this famous poet who by now you are starting to look at in a different light. His experiences, decisions and actions as he was developing into the poet we know him to be take on a different significance when looked at from the perspective of this man becoming the most feared serial killer in London. Patterson, through extensive research spanning the last 20 years can not only place Francis Thompson at the scene of the murders but he can prove he had the ability and the motive to carry them out. A fascinating insight into Francis Thompson himself, his vagrant years and drug addiction is covered in detail and the parallels that can be drawn between Thompson and the Ripper are striking.With a concluding chapter which brings all the strands of Francis Thompson’s life, his works, and his skills together in line with the activities of Jack the Ripper, this book is an impressive piece of work which delivers on its promises and opens the narrative for Francis Thompson being Jack the Ripper with an undeniable impact.

Also included is the full article “Was Francis Thompson Jack the Ripper?” published by Dr Joseph C. Rupp in 1988 and Thompson’s Finis Coronat Opus: The Final Crowning work giving an insightful look at his thoughts and state of mind in 1889, one year after the Ripper murders took place. If you have an interest in the legend that is the Ripper and the theories which surround him and his horrific crimes, this book does indeed deliver a compelling argument for Francis Thompson as the killer that just may well have solved the Jack the Ripper murders.


Amazon Books Australia 5 Stars
Case Closed
By Amazon Customer on 21 April 2017.

This is a fascinating read that carefully and logically explains a chain of coincidences that can't be just coincidence. Richard very convincingly outlines his premise that Thompson was more than just a mild English poet - rather a likely suspect for the unsolved Ripper case. As a former private investigator I was sceptical at first, however after reading this book I felt like posting a copy to Scotland Yard with a note saying 'case closed'. Read it yourself to delve into the mind of a very unstable, charming and evil killer.

Amazon Books Australia 5 Stars
A great read for either the novice or seasoned follower.
By Tahlia Mulder on 5 May 2017.

Having never read anything before about Jack The Ripper I am intrigued with Richard Patterson's account of Francis Thompson's life. His writings delves into a young man's very disturbed mind and takes you back to the London Streets of this very frightening time. A great read for either the novice or seasoned follower of Jack The Ripper informative.

Amazon Books US 5 Stars
Well Researched.
By Robert Catherman M.D. 7 May 2017.

Dr Catherman is The ex-Chief Medical Examiner for the city of Philadelphia, who has given expert medical testimony for many high profile murder trials.

As a Forensic Pathologist with close to 60 years of experience in evaluating the crime of murder, Patterson's book is extensively researched and well written. It seems a total slam dunk that Francis Thompson and Jack the Ripper are one and the same. The documentation in Patterson's book leaves little doubt in support of that conclusion.


Amazon Books Australia.
Amazing!
By Masad Alfayadh - 7 May 2017.

A combination of an incredibly gripping Dan Brown book, a fascinating historical read and a philosophical reflection on the state of society. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and would highly recommend it to everyone!

For someone who does not know Francis Thomson very well, I felt that the author provided the right amount of information for me to be able to understand Thompson and the conventional perceptions of him. I also felt that he provided just enough information about the context (Catholicism, how medical school functioned in those times, politics, contemporary battles etc).

I really liked the way the book was structured: the poems, the re-published pieces at the end, and the chronological progression through Francis Thompson's life. The poems which were interspersed throughout the text provided a really good segue into Thompson's mind and bolstered the author's already very convincing theory. The pieces at the end provided a really good summary of the text and a really good alternative perspective of the same issue.

I really enjoyed reading this book! I'd recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading about history, crime, psychiatry or biographies.
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  #96  
Old 10-18-2017, 05:41 PM
Richard Patterson Richard Patterson is offline
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Default Reviews from newspapers, magazines, blogs, etc.

Apart from the casual reader, here are what some others have had to say about my book and the theory.

REVIEWS
Gaslight Crime: Francis Thompson as Jack the Ripper
July 27 2017.
Reviewer, John Bainbridge is a British author who read literature and history at the University of East Anglia, specialising in the Victorian Underworld. He writes historical thrillers and murder mysteries set in Victorian England and the 1930s.

It’s a very long time since I last read any of the poetry of Francis Thompson, though his work is probably worth another look if you are interested in fin de siecle London. He still has his admirers and I recall that there used to be a Francis Thompson Society, and that Thompson was a leading figure celebrated long after his death by The 1890s Society.
I’d almost forgotten about him until I was sent a copy of Richard Patterson’s book Jack the Ripper: The Works of Francis Thompson. A most enjoyable and intriguing read, even if it doesn’t altogether convince me that Thompson was the Whitechapel killer. However, were I a police detective at the time, looking at Mr Patterson’s evidence, I would certainly put Thompson in the frame for further investigation.

Now, about twenty years ago, I spent a great deal of time researching Jack the Ripper. I remember long days (and nights) walking the streets of Whitechapel and many hours in dusty archives, including those of the British Library and Museum of London. I came to no particular conclusion as to the identity of the murderer, and I thought then – and I think now – that there will never be a definitive answer as to just who Jack was.

Jack the Ripper books tend to follow the same pattern; a few chapters on the misery of the East End at the time, followed by detailed accounts of the discovery of each victim and the immediate aftermath and the police investigations. Most Ripper books then try to put a favoured suspect in the frame. Some authors go to extraordinary lengths to twist the facts to represent their chosen candidate as the Ripper.

Mr Patterson’s book takes a different approach, which I welcome. He certainly writes about the East End and the victims of this maniac but he wisely assumes that the Ripper reader is already familiar with much of the background. He then spends much of the book looking at the biography of Francis Thompson himself and explaining just why he thinks Thompson could be the Ripper.

At first glance the fragile Thompson, plagued by ill-health, seems an unlikely candidate. But Thompson was a medical student who enjoyed dissecting cadavers, wrote poetry about prostitutes, indulged in a spot of arson when he was young and was an opium addict. He was haunted by the hell-fire of an over-religious upbringing, lived on the streets of London during the relevant period and fell in with a prostitute who at first looked after him and then betrayed him, sending him – Mr Patterson suggests – into a murderous rage.

However, even such a promising background doesn’t necessarily create a serial killer. There are a great many sad individuals who do much of the above but don’t take it to the final extreme of murder. Though, Mr Patterson doesn’t try to force his candidate down the reader’s throat (unlike one or two Ripper authors I could mention). The author wisely invites readers to make up their own minds.

The evidence is, as it has to be, circumstantial. There is no killer blow (no pun intended) which definitively puts Francis Thompson in the frame for the Whitechapel murders.

One problem I have with all Ripper candidate books is that we always get the case for the prosecution, but hardly much of the defence brief. And I cling to the principle that anyone accused of murder should get a fair trial. Sadly, there is no modern biographer of Francis Thompson who could look at this evidence and give an opinion.
That being said, Mr Patterson is fairer than most Ripper authors to his subject, and at the end of the day every reader and Ripperologist must make up his or her own mind.

This is a very enjoyable, well-written book and a fascinating contribution to the age-old debate. Recommended reading for anyone interested in late Victorian crime and society.


TEXANA READS: How Corpus Christi figures in solving Jack the Ripper. May 20 2017. Corpus Christi Caller Times. Dr. Manuel Flores, 55,000 Daily Readers.

This week, “Texana Reads” is taking a side trip to not so jolly ol’ Victorian England where the fog rolls in with a gray blanket of soot from chimney tops and pollution from nearby factories.

Specifically, we are in the Whitechapel District in the East of End of London in the late 1880s. At night, the place is darker than a moonless summer night in the West Texas desert. But the shrill and plaintive wail of a lonely coyote is not heard here. Instead, it is the shrill of women being murdered that echoes through the narrow streets and concrete prison that keeps this place of London isolated from mainstream society.

It is the land of the infamous Jack the Ripper. And, there is a Corpus Christi, Texas twist to the story.

Thanks to a marvelously researched book by Australian author and sleuth Richard Patterson and the help of Dr. Joseph Rupp, former Nueces County Medical Examiner, we may have uncovered the truth behind the ghastly murders of five women (and maybe more) between April and November 1888 in London.

We now know whom Jack the Ripper is (was).

Patterson’s book and Rupp’s chapter and introduction within the book argue that the Ripper is renowned English poet Francis Thompson.

Author of chilling poems such as “The Hound of Heaven” and “Nightmare of the Witch Babies,” Thompson used his poems and writings as a façade, Patterson and Rupp claim. He was in fact, a failed priest, a failed medical student, a failed artist and a failed lover. He became an opium addict, living under a bridge at Charring Cross and walking the streets of London at night for hours, always carrying with him a dissecting knife left over from his six years of studying medicine. It was the same knife, Patterson and Rupp conclude, that Thompson used to rip his victims apart.

Thompson also wanted to be a pressman – a journalist of sorts – but the best he could do was sell matches on the street corners of London. The Meynells - the publishers of his works, who wound up inheriting his writings - rescued Thompson from the streets of London. They even wrote his autobiography in which they claimed the poet died of tuberculosis - as a cover up as to whom the real Francis Thompson was.

But Thompson frequently displayed a twisted, ironic genius. He wound up being one of the greatest Catholic/Christian poets England has ever produced. His poetry is as cumbersome as it is brilliant and as Patterson so aptly puts it, “it is like reading he quatrains of a deranged prophet.”

Raised in a devout Catholic family, after been denied priesthood, Thompson spent his life running away from God. He never again went to church. “The Hound of Heaven” is an account of that battle. But, his opiate addiction was more about running from the devil, as we find out, for all the sins he had committed.

Yet, it must have been his genius that helped him write the insightful words and escape capture from authorities for the appalling murders he must have committed.

Patterson and Rupp are so convincing in their writings that readers of this book may agree that the 130-year-old mystery of the London murders has been solved.

There is no need to worry. There will be “The Ripper Resurrects” sequel. Thompson was buried in 1907, allegedly dying from an overdose of laudanum – a mixture of opium and alcohol – or was he? Even his death was a mystery and some claim it was murder by the very friends who nurtured his writing and poetry.

Patterson admits that it was not he who discovered Thompson was Jack the Ripper. That honor belongs to Rupp who wrote the revealing article for the UK Journal “The Criminologist” – a respected and serious publication on forensics and crime – in 1988 during the centenary of the Ripper murders. Patterson calls Rupp’s article, which is reprinted in its entirety in the book, a milestone. “(Rupp’s) many years of experience told him that skill was more important than strength when it came to use of a dissecting knife.”

Titled simply “Was Francis Thompson Jack the Ripper?” He was.

Patterson, in explaining to Rupp why he chose him to do the introduction and why his article was reprinted, said, “As to why you were chosen to write the intro? The answer is that the theory is your baby."


May 4th 2017
The reviewer, Fiona Guy, is a well-known criminal psychology writer and researcher with a Bachelor and Masters of Science degrees. Fiona gives it 4.8 out of five stars.

For three months in the autumn of 1888 a killer roamed the streets of Whitechapel in London. Five murders have been conclusively attributed to the work of this one individual, a man who called himself Jack the Ripper. Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes and Mary Jane Kelly were all murdered in the dead of night with their bodies left out on display in the most gruesome fashion. With little evidence to go on and a distinctly different form of police investigation available then to what we have now, Victorian investigators never did get close to identifying their killer.

Renowned English poet Francis Thompson is not a name anyone would expect to appear in the long list of suspects that has been complied over the years but, before you switch off, take a closer look because this suggestion taken forward today by Richard Patterson in Jack the Ripper: The Works of Francis Thompson published by Austin Macauley, has become much more than a mere thought.

It has become a viable theory that is backed up by solid motives, clear opportunity and page after page of credible parallels that even the most seasoned Ripperologist cannot ignore.

While Francis Thompson has enjoyed a historical legacy as being a talented Victorian poet, he should now also be viewed as quite possibly the only viable person to have actually been the elusive Jack the Ripper.

The crimes of the serial murderer now known the world over as Jack the Ripper are more gruesome and more horrific than many people realise. The mutilation of his victims was extensive and despite its gore and shock factor this dissection of a body required skill and precision. For a man to carry out this kind of work in the dark on the back streets of London when he could have been discovered at any moment is, if it can be said in the same paragraph as murder, impressive. Skills which Francis Thompson had in abundance.

“If someone came to me and offered a king’s ransom to perform a partial autopsy (evisceration) in the dark, on the ground, bare handed with only a surgical knife and no assistance plus a time constraint of a few minutes, my answer would be, ‘Certainly, not, are you crazy?’” – Dr Joseph C. Rupp

When American historian John Evangelist Walsh began researching Francis Thompson in the early 1960’s for his planned biography, his discoveries about the crimes of Jack the Ripper took on new meaning when he realised the parallels to the life of Francis Thompson. When he published his work on the English Victorian poet in 1967 he added a footnote referring to Thompson as a potential Jack the Ripper suspect, a note that was either unnoticed or entirely ignored.

In the winter of 1988 an article appeared in the American Society of Criminology publication The Criminologist. Written by respected American Forensic Pathologist Joseph C. Rupp, who provides the Foreword in this book, it suggested that the famous English poet Francis Thompson may have been the elusive, violent and skilled multiple murderer Jack The Ripper. This too was met with silence, so when he was contacted 27 years later by Australian author and researcher Richard Patterson, it came as quite shock.

Extensively researched, Richard Patterson’s book Jack The Ripper: The Works of Francis Thompson takes you through the life of Francis Thompson but it is far from a dry account of his life. It is a fascinating insight into the early beginnings of this famous poet who by now you are starting to look at in a different light. His experiences, decisions and actions as he was developing into the poet we know him to be take on a different significance when looked at from the perspective of this man becoming the most feared serial killer in London.

Richard Patterson’s writing style is fluid and energetic giving detail and explanations where needed with no heavy hard going paragraphs. There are more than a few coincidences when the life of Francis Thompson and the actions of Jack the Ripper are looked at in parallel, coincidences that build into a model that places Francis Thompson in the centre of the Jack the Ripper timeline. Richard Patterson is based in Melbourne, Australia and has travelled the world researching Francis Thompson and Jack the Ripper, viewing original documents and giving talks on his work.

He has spent countless hours in the Burns Library in Boston studying Thompson’s letters, visited London and the scene of each murder. His research and theory has featured in newspapers and magazines and he has twice been a guest speaker at the annual UK Jack the Ripper Conference, in 2015 and 2016. Furthermore, his work has some key components which raise its profile; Richard Patterson can place Francis Thompson at the scene of all the murders and he can provide evidence for motive and opportunity.

“When the murders happened Thompson, then an ex-medical student, lived just a 15 minute walk to where all five women were knifed. The bed of this man, whose writing shows a hatred of prostitutes, was only 100 meters, just up the street, from the last victim. At this time Thompson was carrying, under a long coat, a knife, which he kept razor sharp, while he was hunting for a prostitute after their failed relationship.” – Richard Patterson

Francis Thompson is known to have had a difficult life. Despite a promising career ahead of him as a doctor his failure at medical school did not place him well in the eyes of his family. However, six years of medical training and hour upon hour dissecting cadavers provided Francis Thompson with some unique abilities when it came to the dissection of the human body. Desertion of his studies and travel to London in 1885 saw the start of his homeless status, drifting from lodgings to lodgings using opium as a way to relieve his failings.

Thomas De Quincey was an English writer whose name was often spoken in the same breath at Edgar Allen Poe and was somebody Thompson identified with. The dark writings of De Quincey were picked up on by the press around the time of the Ripper murders as a comparison, fiction that could be presented to the public who had never seen anything as grim and gruesome as the Jack the Ripper murders in real life.

“Have we a murderous maniac loose in East London? It looks as if we have. Nothing so appalling, so devilish, so inhuman…” – The Star newspaper

Following in the footsteps of De Quency, Thompson found his way to London and a life on the streets. Thompson himself quoted De Quincey’s work and there were many similarities in their lives. The travels to London, the homelessness, the struggles to become a writer, the addictions they both had to opium. Did Thompson internalize these dark words from literature and in his twisted drug fuelled mind bring them to life and give them meaning?

This chapter of Thompson’s life, the time before he ‘made it’ as a literary marvel and successful poet is one most are unfamiliar with but it is a time period vital to the theory of Thompson being Jack the Ripper. In 1885 Thompson is in London going from lodging to lodging until he stopped accepting payouts from his father. He was now truly homeless in clothes that had been worn down to rags.

When Francis Thompson became ill with fever he was prescribed laudanum, a drug based on opium and it was this which would kickstart Thompson’s lifelong drug addiction. He was hired by a shoemaker John McMaster in August 1886 who took pity on him, describing him as a “dilapidated opium-haunted wreck”. Money to Thompson meant more opportunity to get hold of more drugs which he continued to favour over food, clothing or lodgings.

Despite his destitute status, Thompson was determined to succeed and he pushed himself to write. The significance of a poem he wrote in this period is striking. The Nightmare of the Witch Babies was most likely written while Thompson was under the influence of his beloved laudanum but it is a dark and gruesome piece of writing that promotes a concern for the mind of the person behind the pen.

His experiences up until that point have combined into words and into an outpouring of his emotional state. It is a poem of revealing insight into the true reality of the mind of Francis Thompson. “It shows his rage against women who abandon and betray him. The poem begins with the protagonist, a ‘lusty knight’ on a hunt, but he hunts in London, after dark, and his game is women.” says Richard Patterson.

The descriptions in this poem, the detail and the violence is unmistakable. “..soon he begins to stalk her, swiftly he followed her. Ha! Ha! Eagerly he followed her” he writes. “…the knight captures her and decides to kill her. He slices her open and drags out the contents of her stomach, he guts her like an animal..” he continues.

This poem is a blueprint for brutal, violent and gruesome murder detailing the slaughter of a woman who is gutted with a focus on blood and death. It is dark, it is disturbed and it is terrifying. “To him, his poems were records of real events in his life clothed in rhyme and symbolism”, says Richard Patterson, pointing out that Francis Thompson told his editor in his own words “the poems were, in fact, a kind of poetic diary;…”.

Francis Thompson is telling the truths of his life through his poem. He is using his writing and his poetry, at his own admission, as a personal recording of his own life and potentially his own actions. In June 1887 a woman appeared in his life. She was a prostitute, the type of woman that Thompson despised and had written in so much detail about killing so very brutally in his Witch Babies poem, yet here he was entering into a relationship with one such woman. Still today the name of this woman has never been discovered but she existed, only to leave him just as his writing got picked up by editor and journalist Wilfrid Meynell, the man who would mould his legacy as a respected poet, particularly after his death.

Addressing all the myths and debated issues surrounding the Jack the Ripper murders including the infamous ‘Dear Boss’ letter, the notion that Francis Thompson was too intoxicated by his drug addiction to have carried out the murders, Richard Patterson illustrates his argument with quotes and narrative from official documents of the time, from those who knew Francis Thompson and through Thompson’s own words in his poems. With a concluding chapter which brings all the strands of Francis Thompson’s life, his works, and his skills together in line with the activities of Jack the Ripper, this book is an impressive piece of work which delivers on its promises and opens the narrative for Francis Thompson being Jack the Ripper with an undeniable impact.

Also included is the full article “Was Francis Thompson Jack the Ripper?” published by Dr Joseph C. Rupp in 1988 and Thompson’s Finis Coronat Opus: The Final Crowning work giving an insightful look at his thoughts and state of mind in 1889, one year after the Ripper murders took place.

Jack the Ripper: The Works of Francis Thompson is an extensive piece of work in a book which highlights a perceived mild-mannered famous poet, as a man with a dark past. A past which may have included serial murder. If you have an interest in the legend that is the Ripper and the theories which surround him and his horrific crimes, this book does indeed deliver a compelling argument for Francis Thompson as the killer that just may well have solved the Jack the Ripper murders.

Whitechapel in London has become infamous due to the gruesome series of murders which took place there in 1888, carried out by one individual now widely known as Jack the Ripper. In the search for the identity of this killer the theory of Richard Patterson that renowned and respected English poet Francis Thompson was the Ripper is, initially, a surprising one but keep reading because this is a theory which holds a great deal of weight. Patterson through extensive research spanning the last 20 years can not only place Francis Thompson at the scene of the murders but he can prove he had the ability and the motive to carry them out. A fascinating insight into Francis Thompson himself, his vagrant years and drug addiction is covered in detail and the parallels that can be drawn between Thompson and the Ripper are striking. Thompson's own words in his poetry are explored showcasing his dark thoughts repeated references and descriptions of brutal murder mirroring the reality of the five murders the Ripper carried out. An excellent read providing a viable and convincing argument for the identity of the most feared serial killer of the Victorian era, Jack the Ripper: The Works of Francis Thompson is a must read for anyone with an interest in this intriguing case.'


April 21. 2017
By Alessandro Mana,
Redjack

"Richard A. Patterson illuminates the nebulous and dreary alleyways of Victorian London with a neon light, highlighting all the strange "coincidences" that Thompson and Jack the Ripper share. It does so by reconstructing the poet's life through all possible documentation, analyzing his works and private postcards with his publishers. He does not leave anything bare. It follows the religious and the medical track. Try to track every single move. It compares newspapers and testimonies of the Whitechapel murders case with the description of the suspect. What is derived is a shadow of what may have happened in those 10 weeks of 1888 and how and why everything has been so mysteriously interrupted. A story of Poetry and Madness."

May 30th. 2016
True Crime Reader
A new theory on Jack the Ripper.

Melbourne author Richard Patterson has presented another theory to the mystery of Jack the Ripper – and he thinks he’s found the real culprit.

Patterson’s book Francis Thompson – A Ripper Suspect puts forward the theory that a poet was the infamous killer.
“Out of all the people suspected of the Whitechapel crimes, it would be hard to imagine anyone less likely to fit the image of a rough and strong armed assassin, like the paper’s described, than this mild mannered poet…,” Patterson writes.

The book is an interesting read full of the history of London’s East End, the background about the Ripper theories and investigations and of course, meticulous research (the teacher from New South Wales has spent more than 20 years researching his theory) about Francis Thompson, his poems and why the author believes he is strong contender to be Jack the Ripper.

His theory came about in 1997 when he read a book of Thompson’s poetry. Then there was the fact that Thompson also trained as a doctor that led Patterson (pictured middle) on his research journey.

Not surprisingly Patterson’s book, which he self published in 2015, has received press attention from around the world.

“I’m grateful to have played some part in helping people understand Thompson, and why he might have been the Ripper,” Patterson told UK’s The Mirror newspaper.

“Thompson kept a dissecting knife under his coat, and he was taught a rare surgical procedure that was found in the mutilations of more than one of the Ripper victims.”

For those interested in Jack the Ripper, and the more ardent “Ripperologists”, Patterson’s book is a compelling read.

I have nothing but respect for people who research as passionately as Patterson has for this book.


Crime Bookshelf. True Crime Books & Reviews. By Fiona Guy.
April 5th. 2016. Crime Traveller

Richard Patterson can place Francis Thompson at the scene of all the murders and he can provide evidence for motive and opportunity....

His work has also being picked up across the globe with the UK Huffington Post, The New York Daily News and The Examiner.com amongst others, all running articles....

In a comprehensive study of Thompson’s life, Richard Patterson has thought deeply about this man as a Ripper suspect. This is not an overview or a summary of a suspect with some points as to why. This is extensive research and it is quite convincing. Examining this man’s life and his experiences, Richard Patterson has been able to piece together these elements, all giving rise to the notion that Francis Thompson became a serial killer. With the first half of his book dedicated to telling the story of Francis Thompson’s life, it is the second half where Richard Patterson’s theory on Francis Thompson being the elusive Jack the Ripper really comes into play. It tells of disturbing unpublished poems written by Francis Thompson at the time of the murders. Poems filled with blood, razor sharp knives and women. His medical training, proximity to each murder and the possibility he even knew some of the victims comes to light....

As the facts come together, page by page it becomes clear just how possible and likely it was that Francis Thompson was indeed the man responsible for the brutal murders of Whitechapel in 1888....after reading true crime for many years and being very familiar with the most famous unsolved serial killer case in the UK, he has me convinced. An involved read which is detailed and compelling, Francis Thompson – A Ripper Suspect, provides an intelligent researched look at the life of one individual and how he is placed within the Jack the Ripper story. A historical account which gives a real sense of the era in which Francis Thompson lived and the attitudes and way of life around the time of the Whitechapel murders. This is an extensive piece of work in a book which highlights a perceived mild-mannered famous poet, as a man with a dark past. For anyone who has an interest in Jack the Ripper, his crimes and his identity, this book is a must read and one I highly recommend.


Ripperologist Issue No. 126. February 2016. By Paul Begg.
Mr. Begg, the reviewer, is a noted British researcher, writer and author. He is a leading authority on the subject of Jack the Ripper. He regularly appears on TV documentaries on the Ripper, has advised the novelists Tom Clancy and Patricia Cornwell on the facts behind the mystery and has given talks to the FBI on the subject. His major credits include Jack the Ripper: The Uncensored Facts and co-authorship of The Jack the Ripper A to Z, now in its third edition.

'Reading this book left me with the conviction that Francis Thompson ought to have been certified and looked after in an asylum…he didn’t think highly of prostitutes, once writing: ‘‘These girls whose practice is a putrid ulceration of love, venting foul and purulent discharge, for their very utterance is a hideous blasphemy against the sacrosanctity of lover’s language!’……In fact, Patterson describes in some detail how his early biographers carefully removed anything from his writings that revealed that he had been a drug addict living off immoral earnings…nobody has hitherto made a strong case for Thompson…This certainly needs to be reconsidered in light of Patterson’s book! Francis Thompson merits a close re-examination. There are many reasons why Patterson pokes the finger of guilt at Francis Thompson. …There seems little doubt that Thompson stayed at the Providence Row Night Refuge at the top end of Dorset Street [The street a victim was killed] and Patterson plausibly argues that the only time Thompson met the necessary conditions to stay there was in November 1888. [The month & year of the murder] Patterson also rightly makes much of a link between Thompson and Jack the Ripper… to a suspect who, says Patterson, ‘eerily matched that of Francis Thompson’.….‘Mr Moring’, …said to have been a friend of Mary Kelly. …. it is not unlikely that ‘Mr Moring’ could have been Thompson, …Overall, I think Richard Patterson has made a very good case for Francis Thompson to be taken off the shelf of neglected Ripper candidates and to be looked at more closely. …Anyway, I approached this book with a sense of duty. I left it knowing a lot about Francis Thompson, with a couple of biographies on order, a Kindle edition of his complete works, and plans to seriously update the A to Z entry…I think Richard Patterson has made a good case and that Thompson deserves to be looked at closely.

Reading Ghost. Five Stars. By Bjork Rex Jenson.
February 19th, 2016. Jack the Ripper Finally Revealed.

Oh boy, this was an interesting and informative read. With "Francis Thompson - A Ripper Suspect" Richard Patterson takes us on a fascinating journey into the mind of a 19th century poet with a taste for the occult and macabre.

As a child, Francis began starting fires, and he enjoyed making mutilations on dolls. The fire starting is a known trait to serial killers

Thompson had a massive drug (opium) abuse, and he was homeless for quite some time. He had any opportunity hunting the streets and hide in plain sight as he would easily fit into the crowd. Besides Francis Thompson managed to gain the public´s trust and admiration along his route to becoming a famous writer. Meaning even due to his life as homeless people would never consider him as a Ripper suspect

Francis lived less than two minutes from one of the murder scenes. He had medical training and was highly trained in human dissection

We learn about some of Thompson´s writings and especially his poem "Witch Babies" may give us an idea how his look upon life was beneath the surface

I won´t go into specific details in the book but just to mention a few subjects Richard Patterson takes us trough the life of Francis Thompson. Mr. Thompson had a profound love for small girls. He was into the occult. The places where his victims were killed might have had a much more distinct meaning than we have always believed. When Mr. Patterson takes us way back in time than the 19th century, we learn about some awful historical scenes occurring on some of the crime scenes.

Conclusion

First of all, you guys need to know this is NOT just another Ripper Suspect Book, and it´s NOT just another guess on who might have been the Ripper. This book is in my opinion, Historical artwork

"Francis Thompson - A Ripper Suspect" was not a book I just sat down and read. It took me longer to read this book as it´s so fascinating I took lots of notes

I'm genuinely fascinated by the excellent research and work Richard Patterson has put into his book. I received knowledge about the Ripper case and the history of England I've never imagined I would ever receive.

I had always thought about how Jack the Ripper could walk those paving stones in a fast manner, and now I know how it may have been possible.

We learn how even the dates of the killings may have had symbolism for Jack, the Ripper.

Besides telling about Francis Thompson, Mr. Patterson doesn't forget the victims. In the end, of the book, each victim is mentioned, and you receive information about each woman's life before their fateful meeting with The Ripper

So now is the mystery solved?

It is hard to say but in my view it is very likely that Francis Thompson might have been Jack the Ripper. The conjunctures are so tremendous it´s hard to see how he wouldn't have been The Ripper.
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"Jack the Ripper, The Works of Francis Thompson"

http://www.francisjthompson.com/
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Old 10-18-2017, 06:16 PM
Varqm Varqm is offline
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It does not matter.You have not proven anything close,i.e that he stayed at providence row (describing it's outside does not prove anything -so have thousands of people but did not write about it) or even applied to stay;carrying a knife - so did a lot in Spitalfields including butchers,etc.;violent poems Ive read worse - it's not a crime or something unusual or prove somebody is a killer/potential killer -as writers anything the mind could imagine was/is "game".
Also crime scenes and witnesses are the best we have,you have to find a way to fit Thompson to one crime scene which you have not done.
When the smoke clears you really have nothing.
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Clearly the first human laws spawned organized religion's morality from which it only copied,ex. you cannot kill,
steal (forced, otherwise people run back to the hills).
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  #98  
Old 10-18-2017, 06:24 PM
Richard Patterson Richard Patterson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Varqm View Post
It does not matter.You have not proven anything close,i.e that he stayed at providence row (describing it's outside does not prove anything -so have thousands of people but did not write about it) or even applied to stay;carrying a knife - so did a lot in Spitalfields including butchers,etc.;violent poems Ive read worse - it's not a crime or something unusual or prove somebody is a killer/potential killer -as writers anything the mind could imagine was/is "game".
Also crime scenes and witnesses are the best we have,you have to find a way to fit Thompson to one crime scene which you have not done.
When the smoke clears you really have nothing.
Do you think that I cannot fit Thompson's description to that of witness descriptions?
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