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Go Back   Casebook Forums > Social Chat > Other Mysteries > A6 Murders

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  #4371  
Old 01-15-2018, 12:04 PM
moste moste is offline
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Hi Caz,
All I’m meaning is , had two bodies been discovered side by side both with bullet holes through and through their heads , then it would be very likely that the police would consider that they would need to be looking at some sort of contract killing here.
The fact that the attack on Storie was such a mess, and the car had been removed from the site, draws one away from the concept of a hit man,
The shooting of Gregsten I don’t believe had anything to do with a knee jerk reaction.
I have spent quite a while looking into the firing action of a double action Enfield .38 revolver ,(the model in question being a Second World War issue to officers,)
and I am convinced that Gregstens death was pre determined, and professionally executed. That’s all.
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  #4372  
Old 01-15-2018, 12:42 PM
cobalt cobalt is offline
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I was referring to the embargo placed on the details of the libel action brought by William Ewer against Times Newspapers. The one that expires in 2063. That is one very important umbrella salesman.

Also, Ewer acted as proxy-bidder at art auctions on behalf of wealthy buyers, for which he would have received a nice commission.

How do we know that Ewer was not the wealthy buyer himself? And if he was a proxy-buyer, was he buying for some VIP?

Nobody is 'above the law', but Alphon knew that as far as the A6 was concerned the law couldn't touch him, as he'd been cleared.

I don't think that is quite correct, for since Alphon had never stood trial the double jeapordy ruling would not apply. He was never legally charged, therefore never cleared of anything.
His provocative claims made in Paris would surely have been grounds for him being required, at the very least, to return the money he was awarded for wrongful arrest. Alphon's confidence more likely sprang from his realisation that the A6 Case could never be re-opened without the admission that an innocent man had possibly been executed; that was his trump card.
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  #4373  
Old 01-16-2018, 03:05 AM
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caz caz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moste View Post
Hi Caz,
All Iím meaning is , had two bodies been discovered side by side both with bullet holes through and through their heads , then it would be very likely that the police would consider that they would need to be looking at some sort of contract killing here.
The fact that the attack on Storie was such a mess, and the car had been removed from the site, draws one away from the concept of a hit man,
The shooting of Gregsten I donít believe had anything to do with a knee jerk reaction.
I have spent quite a while looking into the firing action of a double action Enfield .38 revolver ,(the model in question being a Second World War issue to officers,)
and I am convinced that Gregstens death was pre determined, and professionally executed. Thatís all.
Hi moste,

Thanks for the clarification.

So are you saying this professional hit man deliberately made a mess of shooting Storie, leaving her alive, but permanently maimed, so nobody but you would consider this to be a pre determined, professional job?

Did he also predict that Storie would go on to identify another man, but one with the same blood group, who was ripe for setting up because he was his own worst enemy and a hopeless liar, who was likely to fuc* up his alibi?

Why did this professional hit man go to the trouble of taking and using a hankie belonging to Hanratty, when transporting the murder weapon to the bus? What advantage did he get in 1961 from doing so?

Love,

Caz
X
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  #4374  
Old 01-16-2018, 03:14 AM
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caz caz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
I was referring to the embargo placed on the details of the libel action brought by William Ewer against Times Newspapers. The one that expires in 2063. That is one very important umbrella salesman.
I'm not sure that's necessarily true, cobalt. Doesn't there have to be a very good reason before files are opened early to every curious Tom, Dick or Harry sniffing around for some kind of conspiracy, because they simply refuse to accept the outcome of a case, where even the defence team admitted defeat after a second appeal?

Love,

Caz
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  #4375  
Old 01-16-2018, 03:36 AM
NickB NickB is offline
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They have only admitted defeat in the sense that no new appeal has been launched. They did not accept the findings of the second appeal.

Throughout the campaign for Hanratty's innocence the cry was: "All we are asking for is a public enquiry". What they meant was: "We will only accept a public enquiry that tells us we are right."
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  #4376  
Old 01-16-2018, 04:22 AM
Graham Graham is offline
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Quote:
How do we know that Ewer was not the wealthy buyer himself? And if he was a proxy-buyer, was he buying for some VIP?
Of course, we don't know for sure, but a long time ago a poster to these boards found a website dedicated to antique sales in which an article - probably a painting, but I can't remember - was sold at auction to Mr William Ewer, a proxy for the actual buyer. So he did this at least once - not uncommon in the top end of the antiques and fine-art market.

Quote:
Nobody is 'above the law', but Alphon knew that as far as the A6 was concerned the law couldn't touch him, as he'd been cleared
.

OK, I should have said cleared of suspicion, which he was once Valerie Storie had failed to identify him. I'm sure you understood what I meant.

Graham
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  #4377  
Old 01-16-2018, 08:55 AM
cobalt cobalt is offline
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I'm not sure that's necessarily true, cobalt. Doesn't there have to be a very good reason before files are opened early to every curious Tom, Dick or Harry sniffing around for some kind of conspiracy, because they simply refuse to accept the outcome of a case, where even the defence team admitted defeat after a second appeal?

Well, selected government papers are released after 30 years and they have been known to justify a few conspiracies when they are. Many of the members of the government from 30 years ago are still alive, albeit mostly in The House of Lords these days.

In that light, an embargo of 90 years on a libel case is inexplicable especially since Mr. Ewer, like most of the main players, is no longer alive. Something or somebody is clearly being protected from scrutiny by what you call 'Tom, Dick or Harry,' but which I would prefer to call the British public.

In fact the decision to withold matters relating to the A6 case appears rather like a conspiracy in itself, which has repercussions on the amount of trust that can be placed on the DNA evidence.
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  #4378  
Old 01-16-2018, 11:41 AM
moste moste is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caz View Post
Hi moste,

Thanks for the clarification.

So are you saying this professional hit man deliberately made a mess of shooting Storie, leaving her alive, but permanently maimed, so nobody but you would consider this to be a pre determined, professional job?

Did he also predict that Storie would go on to identify another man, but one with the same blood group, who was ripe for setting up because he was his own worst enemy and a hopeless liar, who was likely to fuc* up his alibi?

Why did this professional hit man go to the trouble of taking and using a hankie belonging to Hanratty, when transporting the murder weapon to the bus? What advantage did he get in 1961 from doing so?

Love,

Caz
X
None of the above!

Sorry for the lack of clarification.
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  #4379  
Old 01-16-2018, 11:59 AM
Limehouse Limehouse is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moste View Post
Hi Caz,
All I’m meaning is , had two bodies been discovered side by side both with bullet holes through and through their heads , then it would be very likely that the police would consider that they would need to be looking at some sort of contract killing here.
The fact that the attack on Storie was such a mess, and the car had been removed from the site, draws one away from the concept of a hit man,
The shooting of Gregsten I don’t believe had anything to do with a knee jerk reaction.
I have spent quite a while looking into the firing action of a double action Enfield .38 revolver ,(the model in question being a Second World War issue to officers,)
and I am convinced that Gregstens death was pre determined, and professionally executed. That’s all.
Although I do not believe Hanratty was the A6 killer, neither do I believe the crime was anything like a professional execution.

A professional killer would have had transport of their own somewhere nearby, they would not have been relying on the victim's car to exit the crime scene.

Additionally, a professional killer would not have entered the couple's car and risk leaving fibres, fingerprints or other forensic evidence behind. Neither would a professional killer shot someone inside the car and drive off in the car, thus risking being caught in a car with blood and brains all over the passenger seat.

The motive for this crime is made all the more intriguing by the possible connection between Hanratty's friendship with Ms Anderson and Gregtern's brother-in-law, Ewer. That, I think, is where the idea that Gregstern was killed or attacked for a reason, comes from.

I think the key to Hanratty's involvement in this case dates from his release from prison in the spring of 1961, and his encounter with Dixie France soon after. I would like to say more about this in future posts as I think this encounter is crucial to the whole story.
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  #4380  
Old 01-16-2018, 02:38 PM
Spitfire Spitfire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caz View Post
Hi moste,

Thanks for the clarification.

So are you saying this professional hit man deliberately made a mess of shooting Storie, leaving her alive, but permanently maimed, so nobody but you would consider this to be a pre determined, professional job?

Did he also predict that Storie would go on to identify another man, but one with the same blood group, who was ripe for setting up because he was his own worst enemy and a hopeless liar, who was likely to fuc* up his alibi?

Why did this professional hit man go to the trouble of taking and using a hankie belonging to Hanratty, when transporting the murder weapon to the bus? What advantage did he get in 1961 from doing so?

Love,

Caz
X
Moste's theory, which he has expounded on this forum, is that Gregsten and Storie drove voluntarily to Deadman's Hill for the purposes of skulduggery, the precise form of which he does not particularise. There was no hold up at Dorney Reach and the gunman was not in the car during the journey from there to where the murder took place in Bedfordshire.

After the murder(and presumably after the rape), the gunman donned a plastic boiler suit with rubber buttons, so as to avoid leaving incriminating forensic evidence in the car.

This is clearly the work of a professional hitman disguising the murder as the work of an amateur.
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