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Go Back   Casebook Forums > Ripper Discussions > Suspects > General Suspect Discussion

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  #11  
Old 11-14-2017, 05:30 AM
Simon Webb Simon Webb is offline
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Thanks Robert - this has been really useful.

SW
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  #12  
Old 11-14-2017, 05:31 AM
Simon Webb Simon Webb is offline
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Good one, Jeff!

SW
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  #13  
Old 11-14-2017, 05:35 AM
Simon Webb Simon Webb is offline
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Just finished reading Jad Adams's biography of Dowson - really a marvellous book but doesn't mention Jack the Ripper at all.

SW
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  #14  
Old 11-14-2017, 10:03 AM
Scott Nelson Scott Nelson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Nelson
Did Francis Thompson know Ernest Dowson?


Richard Patterson: Good question. Thanks for showing an interest. Yes Thompson did know Earnest Dowson, though not very well. They both attended the Rhymers Club meetings with W.B Yeats. Thompson and Dowson sat next to each other.
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  #15  
Old 11-18-2017, 03:45 PM
SuspectZero SuspectZero is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Nelson View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Nelson
Did Francis Thompson know Ernest Dowson?


Richard Patterson: Good question. Thanks for showing an interest. Yes Thompson did know Earnest Dowson, though not very well. They both attended the Rhymers Club meetings with W.B Yeats. Thompson and Dowson sat next to each other.
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Hi Scott,
That comes from a pretty old thread. Dowson was actually suggested as a suspect by a travel writer, who got a first hand story from an ex East End police officer working at the Old Bailey. While he didn't use his real name (he dubbed him Mr. Moring), he mentioned several characteristics of this certain poet, specifically phrases he would use repeatedly in conversations, which can be traced back directly to Dowson.
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  #16  
Old 11-18-2017, 04:34 PM
Pcdunn Pcdunn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuspectZero View Post
Hi Scott,
That comes from a pretty old thread. Dowson was actually suggested as a suspect by a travel writer, who got a first hand story from an ex East End police officer working at the Old Bailey. While he didn't use his real name (he dubbed him Mr. Moring), he mentioned several characteristics of this certain poet, specifically phrases he would use repeatedly in conversations, which can be traced back directly to Dowson.
Thanks for the info, Suspect Zero, very interesting to hear that "Mr. Moring" may have been the post Ernst Dowson (well, assuming the travel writer was told a true story by the police officer). I may need to research Dowson now.
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  #17  
Old 11-20-2017, 01:42 PM
Richard Patterson Richard Patterson is offline
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Default Thompson discusses Dowson's poetry.

I am not sure if you have read this Simon, but Francis Thompson wrote a critical review on Ernest Dowson’s poetry. Here is part of it.

“...It may be doubted whether the most accomplished morbidity can survive the supreme test of time. In the long run Sanity endures: the finest art goes under if it be perverse and perverted art, though for a while it may create a life under the ribs of death. Yet, with this great doubt, Ernest Dowson's work makes a present and delicate appeal to a generation itself sick of many ills. Not always of special originality or individuality, it is always dainty in form, finished in diction, and perfect in literary taste, with a sensitive avoidance of violence or exaggeration.... It is altogether poetry of feeling, one might well nigh say of a single feeling, or cast of feeling . . .. Dowson sings in many poems of a frail grace, sweetness, and slender completion of form. But the central defect of power keeps him still a lesser poet a poet of the bitten apple, without the core of fire, which made Rossetti, for instance, far more than a lesser poet. And, then, too, unlike Rossetti, he has no brain, but just pure feminine sensibility…”
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  #18  
Old 11-21-2017, 05:28 AM
Simon Webb Simon Webb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Patterson View Post
I am not sure if you have read this Simon, but Francis Thompson wrote a critical review on Ernest Dowson’s poetry. Here is part of it.

“...It may be doubted whether the most accomplished morbidity can survive the supreme test of time. In the long run Sanity endures: the finest art goes under if it be perverse and perverted art, though for a while it may create a life under the ribs of death. Yet, with this great doubt, Ernest Dowson's work makes a present and delicate appeal to a generation itself sick of many ills. Not always of special originality or individuality, it is always dainty in form, finished in diction, and perfect in literary taste, with a sensitive avoidance of violence or exaggeration.... It is altogether poetry of feeling, one might well nigh say of a single feeling, or cast of feeling . . .. Dowson sings in many poems of a frail grace, sweetness, and slender completion of form. But the central defect of power keeps him still a lesser poet a poet of the bitten apple, without the core of fire, which made Rossetti, for instance, far more than a lesser poet. And, then, too, unlike Rossetti, he has no brain, but just pure feminine sensibility…”
This is fascinating, Richard. Where is it from?
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  #19  
Old 11-21-2017, 05:30 AM
Simon Webb Simon Webb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuspectZero View Post
Hi Scott,
That comes from a pretty old thread. Dowson was actually suggested as a suspect by a travel writer, who got a first hand story from an ex East End police officer working at the Old Bailey. While he didn't use his real name (he dubbed him Mr. Moring), he mentioned several characteristics of this certain poet, specifically phrases he would use repeatedly in conversations, which can be traced back directly to Dowson.
The writer was a guy called Robert Thurston Hopkins who wrote something about Dowson where he actually named him as well. It's pretty much all on Casebook somewhere.

SW
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  #20  
Old 11-21-2017, 05:33 AM
Simon Webb Simon Webb is offline
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Originally Posted by Pcdunn View Post
Thanks for the info, Suspect Zero, very interesting to hear that "Mr. Moring" may have been the post Ernst Dowson (well, assuming the travel writer was told a true story by the police officer). I may need to research Dowson now.
As I'm researching I'm beginning to doubt the existence of the travel writer's (R.T. Hopkins's) Old Bailey official who was an East End copper. As Hopkins also wrote seriously about ghosts I'm not sure I can trust him!
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