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Go Back   Casebook Forums > Ripper Discussions > Letters and Communications > Goulston Street Graffito

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  #81  
Old 08-13-2017, 12:03 AM
John G John G is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Wood View Post
Hi All,

We don't know the exact composition of the GSG. We don't know what was wrongly spelled or grammatically incorrect.

It's all guesswork based upon a pathetic example of evidence gathering by the cops.

All we have to go on are the various transcriptions of the City of London and Metropolitan Police officers.

Between them, they offered a bewildering combination of seven variations as to the GSG's spelling, grammar, capitalization and linage.

Who knows where the faults lay?

Regards,

Simon
Hi Simon,

Yes, you make a very good point. And, of course, we don't even know that it was written by the killer.
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  #82  
Old 08-13-2017, 02:21 AM
Herlock Sholmes Herlock Sholmes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John G View Post
Hi Herlock,

I've seen even reasonably educated people make errors with simple words, such as using "to" when they mean "too." In fact, I'm prone to the odd spelling mistake myself, particularly if I'm writing quickly, although these days I can usually pass it off as a predictive text error!

It's possible that he was trying to present himself as less educated, but then why spell the other words correctly? And exactly how much of an advantage would that have given him? I mean, I'm sure the police wouldn't have excluded an educated suspect simply on the basis of the GSG.

It should also be remembered that Whitechapel was home to a sizeable immigrant population. We cannot therefore assume that English was the first language of the author.
Hi John,

Of course I agree with everything you say there. Mine was just one interpretation among many other possible ones and it's not one that I'm particularly proposing. We can't even be sure that it was actually written by the ripper.
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  #83  
Old 08-13-2017, 11:17 AM
MysterySinger MysterySinger is offline
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Whatever happened to that piece of apron?
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  #84  
Old 08-13-2017, 12:00 PM
Joshua Rogan Joshua Rogan is offline
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Originally Posted by MysterySinger View Post
Whatever happened to that piece of apron?
PC Long took it home as a present for his wife?
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  #85  
Old 08-13-2017, 12:18 PM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is offline
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Originally Posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
PC Long took it home as a present for his wife?
For her sake, I hope she had bad eyesight and no sense of smell.
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  #86  
Old 08-13-2017, 02:20 PM
Joshua Rogan Joshua Rogan is offline
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On the subject of the apron piece... Both Long and Halse refer to it as "a piece of apron". Neither of them, as far as I recall, ever said it was (for instance) "a piece of cloth, later found to be from an apron".

Were they just speaking with hindsight, or does this suggest it was immediately obvious that it came from an apron? In which case, what would have made it so obvious?
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  #87  
Old 08-13-2017, 03:01 PM
GUT GUT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Rogan View Post
On the subject of the apron piece... Both Long and Halse refer to it as "a piece of apron". Neither of them, as far as I recall, ever said it was (for instance) "a piece of cloth, later found to be from an apron".

Were they just speaking with hindsight, or does this suggest it was immediately obvious that it came from an apron? In which case, what would have made it so obvious?
Maybe a string attached may make it obvious.
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  #88  
Old 08-14-2017, 01:31 AM
Sam Flynn Sam Flynn is offline
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Originally Posted by GUT View Post
Maybe a string attached may make it obvious.
There might have been a pocket on it, and/or its sheer size ruled out its being, say, a handkerchief.

Apart from that, I don't have a problem with the idea that the police were speaking with hindsight. Long had, after all, found a sheet of cloth "wet" with blood, discarded in a doorway since he last passed there on his beat. In addition, it would have been obvious that it was not a "finished item" (which would have had a hem/trimmings all around its border), and that it had likely recently been cut from a bigger piece of cloth. Whether he initially perceived it was an apron or not, it was certainly worthy of investigation.
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  #89  
Old 08-14-2017, 01:50 AM
GUT GUT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Flynn View Post
There might have been a pocket on it, and/or its sheer size ruled out its being, say, a handkerchief.

Apart from that, I don't have a problem with the idea that the police were speaking with hindsight. Long had, after all, found a sheet of cloth "wet" with blood, discarded in a doorway since he last passed there on his beat. In addition, it would have been obvious that it was not a "finished item" (which would have had a hem/trimmings all around its border), and that it had likely recently been cut from a bigger piece of cloth. Whether he initially perceived it was an apron or not, it was certainly worthy of investigation.
I must say a pocket crossed my I'd after I posted too.
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Last edited by GUT : 08-14-2017 at 01:53 AM.
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  #90  
Old 08-15-2017, 02:01 AM
Herlock Sholmes Herlock Sholmes is offline
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I didn't know until recently that some don't think that Eddowes was wearing an apron?

Well, when I say 'some' I think I mean just Trevor Marriott?
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