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  #1121  
Old 05-12-2017, 11:16 PM
John G John G is offline
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Originally Posted by ColdCaseJury View Post
JOHN G wrote:

In respect of Wallace, his clothes were never forensically tested, nor was he subjected to a strip search. Superintendent Moore said that he examined him pretty well. However,what did this examination consist of?: "...his boots, hands, and the bottom his trousers." Doesn't seem like a particularly thorough search to me. For instance, his bare legs and feet were never inspected, which is highly significant when you consider the police argument concerning Wallace being naked under the Macintosh. Could it be possible that he rubbed off enough blood with a cloth, and maybe cleaning material, to pass Moore's somewhat cursory visual inspection? The same would also apply to Parry. Now I'm not saying I think that's what did happen, only that it can't be entirely discounted.

John, some good points. WHW's clothes were tested by Benzidine. However, he (his body) was not.

Interesting facts. The nailbrush (which James Murphy makes much of) was taken away by Inspector Gold along with a carpet and towel from the bathroom (and other objects from the house). The carpet, towel and some of the other objects were tested for blood (Benzidine) - the nailbrush was not (it was not even listed in the analyst's report). It was, however, an exhibit at the trial.

The only reference to the drains being tested (Benzidine) comes from Charles St Hill on the radio broadcast, which was picked up by John Gannon. I asked John Gannon whether he had any documentary evidence to support this claim, because I have not found any. It appears there is none.

So, what do you make of this? I have a theory, but I'd been keen to hear your views.
Hi CCJ,

Thanks for the information, much appreciated. It's obviously significant that Wallace's clothing were tested for blood- I would have thought that any traces not thoroughly removed from the skin, assuming he was naked under the Macintosh, would seep through to his suit.

Interestingly, in respect of the assailant, a medical expert for the defence opined, "I should say he could hardly escape being spattered and covered with blood all over".

And you do wonder about Dr McFall's competency. For instance, at the trial he admitted to not even taking any notes whilst observing the progress of rigor; the defence expert responded by stating, "I should certainly do so in my case." Neither did McFall bother taking a rectal temperature to help determine the time of death. Again, the defence expert stated that this is something that should have been done.

It does appear that the evidence for the drains being tested is rather weak: I wonder if Charles St Hill was getting mixed up with the drains being examined for the murder weapon.

However, is this significant? Presumably if any blood was washed off in the bath or sink, traces should have been detected by the benzidine test. It would, though, be interesting to see the views of a modern expert on this matter.

Last edited by John G : 05-12-2017 at 11:20 PM.
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  #1122  
Old 05-15-2017, 01:03 AM
ColdCaseJury ColdCaseJury is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John G View Post
Hi CCJ,

Thanks for the information, much appreciated. It's obviously significant that Wallace's clothing were tested for blood- I would have thought that any traces not thoroughly removed from the skin, assuming he was naked under the Macintosh, would seep through to his suit.

Interestingly, in respect of the assailant, a medical expert for the defence opined, "I should say he could hardly escape being spattered and covered with blood all over".

And you do wonder about Dr McFall's competency. For instance, at the trial he admitted to not even taking any notes whilst observing the progress of rigor; the defence expert responded by stating, "I should certainly do so in my case." Neither did McFall bother taking a rectal temperature to help determine the time of death. Again, the defence expert stated that this is something that should have been done.

It does appear that the evidence for the drains being tested is rather weak: I wonder if Charles St Hill was getting mixed up with the drains being examined for the murder weapon.

However, is this significant? Presumably if any blood was washed off in the bath or sink, traces should have been detected by the benzidine test. It would, though, be interesting to see the views of a modern expert on this matter.
John, the point is there is no record in the police reports of the bath or sink or drains being tested using Benzidine. Items taken from the house were tested (except for the nailbrush from the bathroom). Do you see my point? I find it highly odd.
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  #1123  
Old 05-15-2017, 10:49 AM
John G John G is offline
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John, the point is there is no record in the police reports of the bath or sink or drains being tested using Benzidine. Items taken from the house were tested (except for the nailbrush from the bathroom). Do you see my point? I find it highly odd.
Hi CCJ,

Yes, this is very odd. I wasn't aware that there was no formal record of the bath, sink or drains being tested. Does this mean we have only anecdotal evidence that the tests were carried out?

Interestingly, in Wyndham-Brown there is a reference to William Roberts, the City of Liverpool Analyst:

"The witness gave further evidence as to various scientific experiments he had made to test the clotting or spreading of blood, with particular reference to the clot found on the rim of the water-closet pan in the bathroom."

However, this is obviously a bit vague, with no specific reference to the type of test carried out or whether the sink, drains or bath were tested.
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  #1124  
Old 05-21-2017, 03:56 AM
ColdCaseJury ColdCaseJury is offline
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Default Murphy and the Milk Boy

Hi everyone,

I have just posted on my own forum - at www.ccjforum.com. You can also reach this from my main site - www.coldcasejury.com. I've started two sub-threads - one for the Qualtrough Call and one for The Murder - this is to aid usability. I will add more, suggestions welcome. I see my forum as complementary to this one, focused more on issues raised by my books and research.

The first topic is one that AS has mentioned a few times - about Wallace making up his own schedule and there being no problem with the late arrival of the milk boy on the night of the murder. Murphy raises this point, too, but I think there's a problem.
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  #1125  
Old 05-21-2017, 02:57 PM
AmericanSherlock AmericanSherlock is offline
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I think Wallace was actually suspiciously late...he was known as punctual...a point Goodman himself raises. As it was, he showed up in the area, just barely on time for a location that he demonstably, by his own actions, was baffled as to exactly where it was.

What explanation is there for the fastidious, finnicky Wallace being so unprepared for a business appointment in both timing and knowing where he was going other than that he knew exactly where he was (and wasn't going) and that, pressingly, he could not act until the milk boy had come and gone?

Would it really be suspicious if Wallace left at, say 6:30, instead of 6:50?

I view the milk boy as more of an obstacle to Wallace than a proof one way or the other in regards to timing.

It is the people who believe Wallace was demonstrably innocent that use this as an element of their argument. (He couldn't have had time, he couldn't have relied on the milk boy being late, if the milk boy came at his regular time it would be suspiciously early etc...)

Interestingly, these same people (thinking of Goodman) have asked if the murderer was Wallace, why couldn't he have committed the crime on the Monday night with the pre made alibi of the chess club (7:45).
(The implication being that Monday night would have suited WHW to commit the perfect murder, but not Tuesday, which would have only suited "Qualtrough.") They do not ask any timing questions in regards to a milk boy in this case...

As far as taking a risk, there would always be a risk if WHW was the killer. If he was indeed guilty, he would need the milk boy to come and go before he could act. Perhaps, he wasn't relying on the time factor to show it was impossible he was guilty (again this timing argument is used more by those who believe Wallace was clearly innocent), but rather that he had done a good enough job with the Qualtrough ruse, hoaxing Beattie (more on this in a bit) and minimizing fornesic evidence that he would get off with reasonable doubt.

The circumstancial evidence implicating Wallace in 1 form or another is extremely strong in this case. From the timing on both nights, to Wallace's actions and statements both before and during his search for Menlove Gardens East.

It also depends on the call, and that is my 1 area of concern. The "21st birthday reference" is highly suspicious in regards to Parry. It could be a coincidence, but it belies belief somewhat when you consider Parry actually mentioned that what he was doing was securing an invitation to a 21st birthday. as an alibi (I think for the murder night, but still). I would like to know if Wallace could possibly have known that Parry was going to a 21st birthday or something like that and then used that in his call...probably a stretch though.

How common was 21st bithday policies for children? Is this a plausible coincidence, especially considering Parry was 22 and his girlfriend was 20 (so most of his friends were around that age group)

If Parry made the call, I still don't see the point of luring Wallace out , when he could visit Julia at any time. (Unless you buy Rod's overly complicated theory.) So, that leaves me wondering if it was a prank, part of a conspiracy, or WHW got him to make it under some false pretext etc...

One last point, it's been said that the call was to get WHW out on a Tuesday night, because that's when insurance taking were thought to be the highest.

Using that logic, why couldn't Parry just visit Julia while Wallace was still at work on a Tueday? The sun sets around 4:30 PM in Liverpool in January if that is even a factor.
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  #1126  
Old 05-28-2017, 11:47 PM
AmericanSherlock AmericanSherlock is offline
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In case anyone is interested, this is the best price I have ever seen for this book since it went out of print.

https://www.ebay.com/p/The-Murder-of...815/1075881784
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  #1127  
Old 06-09-2017, 09:23 AM
ColdCaseJury ColdCaseJury is offline
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The first book in the Cold Case Jury series is published next week - my copies arrived today. The Wallace Case will be the second in the series - I'm writing it now. And I have to say - genuinely - I am no nearer in deciding which is the best theory.

The Green Bicycle Mystery is not a good as the Wallace case in terms of the evidence pointing one way and then the next - which case is? - but arguably it is one of the best stories in cannon of unsolved true crime. Set in England in 1919, it reads like a case from the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes... what more do you need to know?
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  #1128  
Old 06-09-2017, 11:19 PM
John G John G is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCaseJury View Post
The first book in the Cold Case Jury series is published next week - my copies arrived today. The Wallace Case will be the second in the series - I'm writing it now. And I have to say - genuinely - I am no nearer in deciding which is the best theory.

The Green Bicycle Mystery is not a good as the Wallace case in terms of the evidence pointing one way and then the next - which case is? - but arguably it is one of the best stories in cannon of unsolved true crime. Set in England in 1919, it reads like a case from the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes... what more do you need to know?
Hi CCJ,

Thanks for this, and ill definitely purchase the new Wallace book-will it be a revised edition from the electronic version or a completely new book? I also have your book, the Green Bicycle Mystery, on Kindle, and it, too, was a most enjoyable read.

By the way, would you consider writing a book about the Hammersmith Nude Murders, which must rank as one of the most fascinating unsolved serial killer cases?

I suppose a big problem is that the police files haven't been officially released. I've read the late David Seabrook's book, Jack of Jumps, which is highly informative, although frankly some of the language he used to describe the unfortunate victims was an absolute disgrace. However, I understand he was given access to the records by "mistake"after he apparently requested information on another case he was working on.

Last edited by John G : 06-09-2017 at 11:31 PM.
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  #1129  
Old 06-10-2017, 01:56 AM
ColdCaseJury ColdCaseJury is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John G View Post
Hi CCJ,

Thanks for this, and ill definitely purchase the new Wallace book-will it be a revised edition from the electronic version or a completely new book? I also have your book, the Green Bicycle Mystery, on Kindle, and it, too, was a most enjoyable read.
Hi John, thanks for your kind comments. All the books are updated, including The Green Bicycle Mystery, which includes updated text/arguments, a new chapter, new evidence documents, and new photographs, some of which have never been published before.

I now believe the complete story of the case has been told for the first time. And Mirror Books have done a great job in the production and layout. Worth checking out!
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  #1130  
Old 06-28-2017, 03:49 AM
RodCrosby RodCrosby is offline
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Official record of Wallace's appeal.
https://www.infotextmanuscripts.org/..._v_wallace.pdf
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