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  #1  
Old 04-11-2012, 05:45 AM
Archaic Archaic is offline
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Thumbs up Glossary of Vict. Occupations for Researchers

Hi everyone.

I came across this handy web-link offering an extensive glossary of c. 1890 trades and occupations. It's arranged alphabetically, with the Victorian term on one side and its modern equivalent/description on the other.

I thought this might be a helpful resource for all those involved in Ripper research, whether one is trying to interpret the occupations listed on old census forms, reading old news articles and transcripts, etc.

The website is titled 'The 1891 London Census Transcription'.

Victorian Occupations A-Z: http://www.census1891.com/occupations-a.htm
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  #2  
Old 04-11-2012, 05:49 AM
Archaic Archaic is offline
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Talking Examples of Odd Victorian Occupations

Here are some wonderfully archaic occupation names to test yourself with.

Who knows what a:
'Fagetter',
'Dexter',
'Platelayer',
'Jack',
'Wabster' ,
or (my favorite!) a 'Wonkey-scoop' does for a living?

(Please try to guess without peeking.)

Cheers,
Archaic

Last edited by Archaic : 04-11-2012 at 05:52 AM.
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  #3  
Old 04-12-2012, 06:30 PM
Carol Carol is offline
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Hi Archaic!

Great idea for a thread!

Here's an occupation for you to guess at.

My great, great grandfather was a Cordwainer.

Carol
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Old 04-12-2012, 09:00 PM
Cogidubnus Cogidubnus is offline
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Default cordwainer?

What a load of old cobblers!

Dave
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Old 04-14-2012, 07:01 AM
Archaic Archaic is offline
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Hi Carol.

I think a cordwainer had something to do with weaving rope...like the rope used on ships.

I didn't peek...hope I'm at least close! (fingers crossed)

Your pal,
Archaic
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Old 04-14-2012, 07:18 AM
Archaic Archaic is offline
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Hi Carol.

After answering you I looked it up, and I see I'm wrong... a cordwainer is a cobbler.

Oh, well...the old memory isn't what it used to be...

I've got one for you. Do you know what a mangler is?

Hint: It's an occupation that shows up in Charles Dickens' works, particularly 'Our Mutual Friend'.

Archaic

Last edited by Archaic : 04-14-2012 at 07:33 AM.
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Old 04-14-2012, 07:56 AM
Cogidubnus Cogidubnus is offline
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Oh jesus...
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Old 04-14-2012, 01:03 PM
Phil Carter Phil Carter is offline
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Hello Dave, Archaic, Carol,

Very interesting thread. Somewhere, ages ago, there was a list of Victorian euphemisms for prostitute, noted, I believe in 1881 and 1891 censuses. The list was surprisingly long I vaguely recall.

As a small sideline, I have remembered a line my Gran used for loose change or payment to in coins.
"Ive a bit of sausage in me sailor" was contrived Cockney for
"Ive a bit of cash in my purse"

For those confused- Sausage and Mash = cash, Sailor's curse= purse.
Regular users of Cockney 'halved' the rhyming slang to make it even less understandable. In more recent times it is done more often than it used to be.

Best wishes

Phil
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Last edited by Phil Carter : 04-14-2012 at 01:12 PM.
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  #9  
Old 04-14-2012, 01:19 PM
Phil Carter Phil Carter is offline
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Hello Archaic,

i think 'Mangler' comes from 'to mangle'- i.e to cripple or destroy or deform. I presume therefore a mangler is one who does the above?

something being 'mangled' or 'mangled up' is pretty commonly used to this day.

Best wishes

Phil
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Old 04-14-2012, 03:04 PM
Cogidubnus Cogidubnus is offline
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I do know a fagetter was a man who sold firewood (it came up in a pub quiz recently!)...that and cordwainer are the only two I can swear to without looking them up or googling...I think Platelayer may be a railway navvy engaged on laying track, Dexter has left-handed connotations, the others (Jack, Wabster and Wonky-Scoop) I coukdn't even begin to guess

All the best

Dave
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